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Years of falling revenues and profligate spending have left the state in a fiscal crisis.
  to spend money recklessly or wastefully; or a person who does so regularly
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profligacy profligate profligates
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  • Years of falling revenues and profligate spending have left the state in a fiscal crisis.
  • a profligate and a drunkard
  • The sexual profligacy of Jews is well known, one of their ugliest traits.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice
  • There comes a turning point in intense physical struggle where one abandons oneself to a profligate usage of strength and bodily resource, ignoring the costs until the struggle is over.
    Diana Gabaldon  --  Outlander

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  • You have profited by their toil to lead a profligate life.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  War and Peace
  • What is to be expected of, or by, such profligates?
    Charles Dickens  --  A Tale of Two Cities
  • He was known to us all as being a most cruel wretch,—a common drunkard, who had, by his reckless mismanagement and profligate dissipation, already wasted a large portion of his father’s property.
    Frederick Douglass  --  The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • The extravagance and general profligacy which he scrupled not to lay at Mr. Wickham’s charge, exceedingly shocked her; the more so, as she could bring no proof of its injustice.
    Jane Austen  --  Pride and Prejudice
  • She was a sensible woman and so she could not help looking upon me as a dissolute profligate incapable of real love.
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  Crime and Punishment
  • What about the profligate Ernest?
    Oscar Wilde  --  The Importance of Being Earnest

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  • Although he possessed erves , and by the reserves of energy, he’d been profligate with those res time he got to Camp Four they were nearly depleted.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into Thin Air
  • I shall never allow people to talk before me about wastefulness and profligacy, and so forth, in connexion with that life, any more.’
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • If you think so, you must have a strange opinion of me; you must regard me as a plotting profligate — a base and low rake who has been simulating disinterested love in order to draw you into a snare deliberately laid, and strip you of honour and rob you of self— respect.
    Charlotte Bronte  --  Jane Eyre
  • But instead of their forming a permanent union, of the kind his mother dreamed about, both used it to embark on a profligate way of life.
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez  --  Love in the Time of Cholera
  • And it is the same in other directions; you will find us neither profligate nor ascetic.
    James Hilton  --  Lost Horizon
  • So here you have this man, this father who reproaches his profligate son!
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  The Brothers Karamazov
  • Besides, he’s such an infernal character—he’s a gambler—he’s a drunkard—he’s a profligate in every way.
    William Makepeace Thackeray  --  Vanity Fair
  • As conversation is a great part of human happiness, so it is a pleasant sight to behold a sweet tempered man, who is always fit for it; to see an air of humour and pleasantness sit ever upon his brow, and even something angelic in his very countenance: Whereas, if we observe a designing man, we shall find a mark of involuntary sadness break in upon his joy, and a certain insurrection in the soul, the natural concomitant of profligate principles.
    Daniel Defoe  --  Robinson Crusoe
  • If he must dispense his balm of Gilead in nostrums and apothegms of dubious taste to restore to health a generation of unfledged profligates let his practice consist better with the doctrines that now engross him.
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • Of the asceticism that deadens the senses, as of the vulgar profligacy that dulls them, it was to know nothing.
    Oscar Wilde  --  The Picture of Dorian Gray
  • But his father—and his uncle—were the most profligate coachmen that ever sat upon a box.
    Charles Dickens  --  Bleak House
  • She may have had religious principles inculcated by some pious mother or grandmother, or some good mistress; she may have a lover, whose good opinion and peace of mind are dear to her heart; or the profligate men who have power over her may be exceedingly odious to her.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • Cunning, ferocity, and drunkeness in all its stages, were there, in their strongest aspect; and women: some with the last lingering tinge of their early freshness almost fading as you looked: others with every mark and stamp of their sex utterly beaten out, and presenting but one loathsome blank of profligacy and crime; some mere girls, others but young women, and none past the prime of life; formed the darkest and saddest portion of this dreary picture.
    Charles Dickens  --  Oliver Twist
  • If we take any one of these coupled opposites, such as piety and profligacy, the analogy is immediately comprehensible.
    Hermann Hesse  --  Steppenwolf
  • He had also a wish to establish himself in the good graces of the lady; for John was at least as licentious in his pleasures as profligate in his ambition.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • His father was well-off by local standards, but he had a lot of children to feed, and he was rather profligate with money, giving it away or buying rounds of drinks.
    Tracy Kidder  --  Strength in What Remains
  • He perceived that he had gifts of profligacy which had been neglected.
    Sinclair Lewis  --  Babbitt
  • A profligate-what can I tell you?
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Identity
  • There was the truth of virginity and the truth of passion, the truth of wealth and of poverty, of thrift and of profligacy, of carelessness and abandon.
    Sherwood Anderson  --  Winesburg, Ohio
  • But let me tell you one thing, aunt: Mr. Wildeve is not a profligate man, any more than I am an improper woman.
    Thomas Hardy  --  The Return of the Native
  • …talking loudly, scattering snuff, and patting his visitors’ backs, to sitting longer at the whist-table—a choice exasperating to uncle Kimble, who, being always volatile in sober business hours, became intense and bitter over cards and brandy, shuffled before his adversary’s deal with a glare of suspicion, and turned up a mean trump-card with an air of inexpressible disgust, as if in a world where such things could happen one might as well enter on a course of reckless profligacy.
    George Eliot  --  Silas Marner
  • We were allowed our own candle, to undress by at night, but Mrs. Honey said we weren’t to burn it up in a profligate way, each candle was to last us a week, and that was less light than Mary wanted to have.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Alias Grace
  • —for with all these symptoms of profligacy at ten years old, she had neither a bad heart nor a bad temper, was seldom stubborn, scarcely ever quarrelsome, and very kind to the little ones, with few interruptions of tyranny; she was moreover noisy and wild, hated confinement and cleanliness, and loved nothing so well in the world as rolling down the green slope at the back of the house.
    Jane Austen  --  Northanger Abbey
  • Nay, that is a trifle; for I know him to be one of the worst men in the world; for had my dear uncle known what I have hitherto endeavoured to conceal, he must have long since abandoned so profligate a wretch.
    Henry Fielding  --  Tom Jones
  • And Mother Teresa, who came to Haiti in 1981, during the time of Baby Doc, and, as one historian put it, "gushed" over the profligate dictator and his widely hated wife, Michele, who had looted millions from the Haitian treasury for her worldwide shopping sprees.
    Tracy Kidder  --  Mountains Beyond Mountains
  • He could talk sagely about the world’s old age, but never actually believed what he said; he was a young man still, and therefore looked upon the world—that gray-bearded and wrinkled profligate, decrepit, without being venerable—as a tender stripling, capable of being improved into all that it ought to be, but scarcely yet had shown the remotest promise of becoming.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The House of the Seven Gables
  • In St. Louis, next morning, he read this brief telegram in the papers—dated at Dawson’s Landing: Judge Driscoll, an old and respected citizen, was assassinated here about midnight by a profligate Italian nobleman or a barber on account of a quarrel growing out of the recent election.
    Mark Twain  --  Pudd’nhead Wilson
  • They are kept at perpetual labour, and are always chained, but with this difference, that their own natives are treated much worse than others: they are considered as more profligate than the rest, and since they could not be restrained by the advantages of so excellent an education, are judged worthy of harder usage.
    Thomas More  --  Utopia
  • Then I let him know what I had brought over in the sloop, besides all this; I mean the horses, hogs, and cows, and other stores for our plantation; all which added to his surprise, and filled his heart with thankfulness; and from this time forward I believe he was as sincere a penitent, and as thoroughly a reformed man, as ever God’s goodness brought back from a profligate, a highwayman, and a robber.
    Daniel Defoe  --  Moll Flanders
  • The list always growing, profligate.
    Chang-rae Lee  --  Native Speaker
  • She said that artists are a bad element, a profligate bunch who shoot heroin.
    Christina Garcia  --  Dreaming in Cuban
  • If you blast their faith by European formalities, they will become infidels and profligates.
    Willa Cather  --  Death Comes for the Archbishop
  • Thus his profligacy and his dare-devil airs have gone the way of his sword and mandoline into the rag shop of anachronisms and superstitions.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Man And Superman
  • Misha’s father described him as a well-known millionaire, Zhivago, a goodnatured profligate, not quite responsible for his actions.
    Boris Pasternak  --  Doctor Zhivago
  • A social welfare report also determined that she had had profligate sexual relations with older men and that she was very probably involved in prostitution.
    Stieg Larsson  --  The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest
  • I do not wish, however, to trace the course of my miserable profligacy here—a profligacy which set at defiance the laws, while it eluded the vigilance of the institution.
    Edgar Allan Poe  --  William Wilson
  • Society is endangered not by the great profligacy of a few, but by laxity of morals amongst all.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 2
  • How long will it be possible that honor, truth or virtue should be respected among a people who are engaged in such a quick and perpetual succession of such profligate collisions and conflicts?
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • In contrast to the profligate spending on sugar and alcohol, the most impoverished families on the globe appear to spend about 2 percent of their incomes educating their children, even though that is the most reliable escalator out of poverty.
    Nicholas D. Kristof  --  Half the Sky
  • With this handsome offer, Mr Gregsbury once more threw himself back in his chair, and looked like a man who had been most profligately liberal, but is determined not to repent of it notwithstanding.
    Charles Dickens  --  Nicholas Nickleby
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Associated words [difficulty]:   profligate [6] , prodigal [5] , prodigal son [7] , spendthrift [7]
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