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brogue
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brogue
as in:  an Irish brogue


sings Irish folk classics with a brogue
  an Irish (or possibly Scottish) accent when speaking English
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Samples:
  • sings Irish folk classics with a brogue
  • spoke with a brogue as thick as his beer
  • Is that a brogue I detect in your accent?
    Neil Gaiman  --  The Graveyard Book
  • "He seemed extremely intelligent," Franz states in an exotic brogue that sounds like a blend of Scottish, Pennsylvania Dutch, and Carolina drawl.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild

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  • He was a handsome young man in his late twenties, with a Scottish brogue and strawberry blond hair.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • You can spot an Irishman or a Yorkshireman by his brogue.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Pygmalion
  • The gravediggers sweated heavily and knew their business and their brogue was Irish.
    Ralph Ellison  --  Invisible Man
  • Their lazy, blurred voices fell pleasantly on his ears, but his own brisk brogue clung to his tongue.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • Lapse into brogue.
    Michael Shaara  --  The Killer Angels
  • Cork air softer also their brogue.
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses

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  • He had a rich deep voice, good both in song and in speech, and while he had no brogue there was a rise and a lilt and a cadence to his talk that made it sound sweet in the ears of the taciturn farmers from the valley bottom.
    John Steinbeck  --  East of Eden
  • " ’tis cold, all right, this morning," said the one on the left, who possessed a rich brogue.
    Theodore Dreiser  --  Sister Carrie
  • The three of them leaned out of the window and shouted, "Happy New Year, everybody!" An instant of silence, then out of the dark a thick Irish brogue shouted: "Happy New Year, youse Nolans!"
    Betty Smith  --  A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
  • MARTHA (Affects a brogue) Awww, ’tis the refuge we take when the unreality of the world weighs too heavy on our tiny heads.
    Edward Albee  --  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  • Sir Marhaus the king’s son of Ireland talks like all the rest; you ought to give him a brogue, or at least a characteristic expletive; by this means one would recognize him as soon as he spoke, without his ever being named.
    Mark Twain  --  A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court
  • Suddenly she lurched up and her voice fell across his brogue like a drill into a mechanical saw.
    Flannery O’Connor  --  A Good Man is Hard to Find AND OTHER STORIES
  • They talked about ties with matching handkerchiefs and they wore brogue shoes and shirts that had bright red and green and yellow stripes in them.
    Dalton Trumbo  --  Johnny Got His Gun
  • I got rid of an Irish brogue you could cut with a knife.
    Eugene O’Neill  --  Long Day’s Journey into Night
  • ’Boy,’ he would say to me in the thick brogue of a champion drunk, ’the only way to fight is to fight dirty.
    J.D. Robb  --  Glory in Death
  • My mother said things to Marian, a story now and then in her Bronxy half brogue, and I sat and listened fitfully behind the body-throb of the dishwasher.
    Don DeLillo  --  Underworld
  • On March 22, in the House of Commons, Burke had delivered in his heavy Irish brogue one of the longest, most brilliant speeches of his career, calling for conciliation with America.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • After several of the Irish himself, Feeney had slipped comfortably into the brogue of the country he’d never seen—that indeed his great-great-grandparents had never set foot on.
    J.D. Robb  --  Immortal in Death
  • One can only guess that the original material of his speech was perhaps the surly Kerry brogue; but the degradation of speech that occurs in London, Glasgow, Dublin and big cities generally has been at work on it so long that nobody but an arrant cockney would dream of calling it a brogue now; for its music is almost gone, though its surliness is still perceptible.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Man And Superman
  • Always had a smile…" Franklin: "We loved his stories told in that Kentucky brogue."
    James Bradley  --  Flags of Our Fathers
  • If you think about it, a person from Scotland with a brogue might not be able to communicate with a person from Texas with a drawl, or with a person from Nigeria with that very clipped speech.
    Robert MacNeil and William Crane  --  Do You Speak American?
  • "A stentor, me ignorant broth of a boy!" cried Mrs. Tarleton, aping his brogue.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • It irritated her so much that during one formal call she aped Gerald’s brogue to her aunt’s distress.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • And suddenly she grinned for, as a voice thick with brogue and whisky came to her, raised in "Peg in a Low-backed Car," she knew.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • Sometimes referred to as the Outer Banks Brogue, Ocracoke dialect is marked by unusual pronunciations of words like high and tide, which sound like hoi and toid, so that locals are often referred to as Hoi-Toiders.
    Robert MacNeil and William Crane  --  Do You Speak American?
  • And the valet, who had begun to attempt a brogue out of admiration for his new master, made requisite answer in a combination of Geechee and County Meath that would have puzzled anyone except those two alone.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • No one would have thought that red-haired Bridget Flaherty, who had a sun-defying white skin and a brogue that could be cut with a butter knife, had stolen her father’s hidden hoard to come to America to be chambermaid in a New York hotel.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • One can only guess that the original material of his speech was perhaps the surly Kerry brogue; but the degradation of speech that occurs in London, Glasgow, Dublin and big cities generally has been at work on it so long that nobody but an arrant cockney would dream of calling it a brogue now; for its music is almost gone, though its surliness is still perceptible.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Man And Superman
  • There’s none in the County can touch you, nor in the state," he informed his mount, with pride, the brogue of County Meath still heavy on his tongue in spite of thirty-nine years in America.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
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Associated words [difficulty]:   brogue [6]
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Most commonly used in these subjects:   Classic Literature, Sports
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