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impertinent
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impertinent
as in:  she was impertinent


It was impertinent of the child to lecture a grownup.
  rude or improperly bold — especially toward someone more respected
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impertinent impertinence impertinently
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Samples:
  • It was impertinent of the child to lecture a grownup.
  • He deemed all such inquiries on the part of a slave improper and impertinent, and evidence of a restless spirit.
    Douglass, Frederick  --  Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass An American Slave
  • I like him on the whole very well; he is clever and has a good deal to say, but he is sometimes impertinent and troublesome.
    Austen, Jane  --  Lady Susan
  • mentioned several impertinent facts before finally coming to the point

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  • He has a very satirical eye, and if I do not begin by being impertinent myself, I shall soon grow afraid of him.
    Austen, Jane  --  Pride and Prejudice
  • "Don’t be impertinent," said the King, "and don’t look at me like that!"
    Lewis Carroll  --  Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
  • "You are a very naughty and impertinent little boy," said Uncle Andrew.
    C.S. Lewis  --  The Magician’s Nephew
  • "It is full time that boy went to herding," said the head-man, while Buldeo puffed and snorted at Mowgli’s impertinence.
    Rudyard Kipling  --  The Jungle Book
  • Arrest this impertinent little creep right now.
    Carl Hiassen  --  Hoot
  • What impertinence!
    Lewis Carroll  --  Through the Looking-Glass

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  • I get positively angry with the impertinence of it and the everlastingness.
    Charlotte Perkins Gilman  --  The Yellow Wallpaper
  • And dressed like a woman of the people, she went to the fruiterer, the grocer, the butcher, a basket on her arm, bargaining, meeting with impertinence, defending her miserable money, sou by sou.
    Guy de Maupassant  --  The Diamond Necklace
  • The scars you so impertinently assumed were transplant scars came from a grenade.
    Neal Shusterman  --  Unwind
  • Such impertinence!
    Margaret Peterson Haddix  --  Uprising
  • The pilot grimaced as if he were a small boy who had been justly rebuked for an impertinence.
    Farley Mowat  --  Never Cry Wolf
  • The king had claimed that magic was an affront to the Goddess and her gods—that to wield it was to impertinently imitate their power.
    Sarah J. Maas  --  Throne of Glass
  • Then you may do without breakfast as well, for your impertinence.
    Gail Carson Levine  --  Ella Enchanted
  • She had asked him to call her Bess, even, but that would have felt impertinent; she had to be in her forties.
    Anne Tayler  --  A Spool of Blue Thread
  • Bennington agreed, but there was something in his eyes that told me I had earned the enmity of a man who would never forget my impertinence, a man who would not rest until the wolves cut my flanks from behind.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Water is Wide
  • Nor do I agree with the idea that "in the presence of certain realities art is trivial or impertinent."
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice
  • She can get away with a little impertinence, with coltish liberties.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Cat’s Eye
  • "Is the I for ’illustrious’ or perhaps ’impertinent’?"
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  Chains
  • "I will thank you not to be impertinent," Aunt Josephine said, using a word which here means "pointing out that I’m wrong, which annoys me."
    Lemony Snicket  --  The Wide Window
  • Officials punished his impertinence by slashing the prisoners’ rations and intensifying their exercise.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
  • He deemed all such inquiries on the part of a slave improper and impertinent, and evidence of a restless spirit.
    Frederick Douglass  --  The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • Certainly; it would indeed be very impertinent and inhuman in me to trouble you with any inquisitiveness of mine.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • He makes you feel it would be an impertinence to like him.
    Ayn Rand  --  The Fountainhead
  • Her manners were pronounced to be very bad indeed, a mixture of pride and impertinence; she had no conversation, no style, no beauty.
    Jane Austen  --  Pride and Prejudice
  • "Would it be impertinent, Signor Sinbad," said Franz, "to ask you the particulars of this kindness?"
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • How very impertinent!
    Arthur Conan Doyle  --  The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
  • Do you know, Mr. Elijah, that I consider you a little impertinent?
    Herman Melville  --  Moby Dick
  • He’ll love and hate equally under cover, and esteem it a species of impertinence to be loved or hated again.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • It would be an impertinence elsewhere, but it is not so here, to ask your name and condition?
    Charles Dickens  --  A Tale of Two Cities
  • The touch of some hands is an impertinence.
    Helen Keller  --  Story of My Life
  • ’You’re an insolent impertinent fellow.
    Charles Dickens  --  Oliver Twist
  • In very brief, the suit is impertinent to myself, as your worship shall know by this honest old man; and, though I say it, though old man, yet poor man, my father.
    William Shakespeare  --  The Merchant of Venice
  • The glance said plainly: "You are impertinent."
    Agatha Christie  --  Murder On The Orient Express
  • THE DAUGHTER [violently] Will you please keep your impertinent remarks to yourself?
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Pygmalion
  • "Mrs. Wren," the man on crutches said, "would you be so kind as to show this impertinent young man the reliquary of ashes?"
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • I find my heart inside my ribs aroused by your impertinence.
    Homer  --  The Odyssey
  • Corporal Whitcomb sauntered back in wearing a shiny new smirk and leaned his elbow impertinently against the center pole of the chaplain’s tent.
    Joseph Heller  --  Catch-22
  • Nevertheless, d’Artagnan was desirous of examining the appearance of this impertinent personage who ridiculed him.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Three Musketeers
  • My late acquired kingdom ran continually in my thoughts all the day, and I dreamed of it in the night: nay, I made it the continual subject of my talk, even to impertinence, when I was awake.
    Daniel Defoe  --  Robinson Crusoe
  • Fritz was so provoked by their impertinent gestures that he raised his gun, and would have shot one of the poor beasts.
    Johann Wyss  --  The Swiss Family Robinson
  • You’ll apologise to me for your impertinence or you’ll quit the office instanter!
    James Joyce  --  Dubliners
  • ’You’ll think me impertinent and rude I dare say,’ I went on, ’but I would like to know why you ask me to come out in the car, day after day.
    Daphne du Maurier  --  Rebecca
  • And then, he had been saying impertinent things to me for a long time: ’You are ugly! you have no teeth!
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • "Never mind your impertinence," she said.
    Ralph Ellison  --  Invisible Man
  • Of course, I often forget my role and find it impossible to curb my anger when they’re unfair, so that they spend the next month saying the most impertinent girl in the world.
    Anne Frank  --  The Diary of a Young Girl
  • This time the knock on the door was most impertinently loud.
    Ray Bradbury  --  The Martian Chronicles
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Associated words [difficulty]:   impertinent [2]
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Most commonly used in these subjects:   Classic Literature, Logic & Reasoning, Religion - Christianity
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