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felicitous


He was a felicitous speaker.
  agreeably appropriate or fortunate
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felicity felicitous felicitously
Strongly Associated with:   felicity
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Samples:
  • He was a felicitous speaker.
  • She lead a felicitous life.
  • And it’s almost too much for me, too felicitous perhaps, to imagine the fantastic idea of what Sunny Medical Supply might be instead of half-emptied and shut, what kind of vital, resplendent establishment could have been built, not for pride or for riches but a place to leave each night and glance back upon and feel sure would contain us.
    Chang-rae Lee  --  A Gesture Life
  • I remember a particularly felicitous rhyme between ’flaky bereft’ and ’bakery theft.’
    Trenton Lee Stewart  --  The Mysterious Benedict Society

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  • I gave them companionship and felicitous union.
    Gail Carson Levine  --  Ella Enchanted
  • Thus I was ready to bide my time and discover what might felicitously happen, see what Sundays like this—entwined amid the other promising days of the onrushing summer—would bring.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice
  • First they took out the soil to make bricks, and then they filled it up again with garbage, which seemed to Jurgis and Ona a felicitous arrangement, characteristic of an enterprising country like America.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • But she remained seated, and he could think of nothing more felicitous than: "I presume you’re tired after the long ride."
    Edith Wharton  --  Ethan Frome
  • Chapter X The felicitous idea occurred to me a morning or two later when I woke, that the best step I could take towards making myself uncommon was to get out of Biddy everything she knew.
    Charles Dickens  --  Great Expectations
  • —your felicitous comparison, he-he!
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  Crime and Punishment

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  • I shall never forget his first speech at the convention—the extraordinary emotion it excited in my own mind—the powerful impression it created upon a crowded auditory, completely taken by surprise—the applause which followed from the beginning to the end of his felicitous remarks.
    Frederick Douglass  --  The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • Even the most felicitous prose translation must fail therefore at times to afford the entire and precise meaning of the original.
    Dante Alighieri  --  Dante’s Inferno
  • This bay is felicitously laid out for their type of fishing.
    Jules Verne  --  Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea
  • He arranged in his own mind, with all sorts of felicitous devices, his departure for England with Cosette, and he beheld his felicity reconstituted wherever he pleased, in the perspective of his revery.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • The man glanced from the lady’s face to the little egg-shaped head and back again; and, almost before he was aware of it, his tongue had found a felicitous moment: "I don’t think, sir," he said, "that that’s a fair question to put to me."
    James Joyce  --  Dubliners
  • She had even commissioned someone to write felicitous messages on red banners, as if my parents themselves had draped these decorations to congratulate me on my good luck.
    Amy Tan  --  The Joy Luck Club
  • She also, by a felicitous thought, took a handkerchief from her bundle and tied it round her face under her bonnet, covering her chin and half her cheeks and temples, as if she were suffering from toothache.
    Thomas Hardy  --  Tess of the d’Urbervilles
  • He had remained in Shropshire, lamenting the blindness of his own pride, and the blunders of his own calculations, till at once released from Louisa by the astonishing and felicitous intelligence of her engagement with Benwick.
    Jane Austen  --  Persuasion
  • With an American pencil, she wrote a word, a felicitous word such as "longevity" or "double joy," which is symmetrical.
    Maxine Hong Kingston  --  The Woman Warrior
  • This arrangement greatly pleased her; it was so felicitously definite.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volumes 1 & 2
  • The felicitous word "demise," which had seasonably occurred to him, had raised his spirits even above their usual evening pitch.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • …the prospect of having to make his appearance with the muddy boots of a pedestrian at Batherley, and to encounter the grinning queries of stablemen, stood unpleasantly in the way of his impatience to be back at Raveloe and carry out his felicitous plan; and a casual visitation of his waistcoat-pocket, as he was ruminating, awakened his memory to the fact that the two or three small coins his forefinger encountered there were of too pale a colour to cover that small debt, without…
    George Eliot  --  Silas Marner
  • Minto Square, Great Clive Street, Warren Street, Hastings Street, Ochterlony Place, Plassy Square, Assaye Terrace ("gardens" was a felicitous word not applied to stucco houses with asphalt terraces in front, so early as 1827)—who does not know these respectable abodes of the retired Indian aristocracy, and the quarter which Mr. Wenham calls the Black Hole, in a word?
    William Makepeace Thackeray  --  Vanity Fair
  • Then Kate had the art of turning the conversation to subjects upon which the country girl, bashful at first in strange company, could feel herself at home; and if Mrs Nickleby was not quite so felicitous at times in the selection of topics of discourse, or if she did seem, as Mrs Browdie expressed it, ’rather high in her notions,’ still nothing could be kinder, and that she took considerable interest in the young couple was manifest from the very long lectures on housewifery with which…
    Charles Dickens  --  Nicholas Nickleby
  • But except for the felicitous pretense of deafness I had not tried to pretend anything.
    Joseph Conrad  --  The Secret Sharer
  • This arrangement greatly pleased her; it was so felicitously definite.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1
  • Some muttered allusions, which followed, to dogs and the smell of roast-meat, struck me as singularly felicitous.
    Joseph Conrad  --  Lord Jim
  • Last night these rough fragments had moved him to tears, and he himself had been surprised by some felicitous passages.
    Boris Pasternak  --  Doctor Zhivago
  • This I believe: that it is intellectually easier to credit a divine intelligence than to submit dumbly to felicitous congeries about nature.
    Jay Allison, et al.  --  This I Believe
  • And with an easy, felicitous wave of his arm he lifted his little, yellowish hand toward the heavens and simultaneously cast an oblique glance in the same upward direction.
    Thomas Mann  --  The Magic Mountain
  • On one level this was natural and something to which Ned had become accustomed, for both women were great beauties, Gertie slim and dark, Julia tall and felicitously proportioned.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Emerson has passages of noble and pathetic eloquence; he has passages of shrewd and felicitous wit; he has crisp epigram; he has passages of exquisitely touched observation of nature.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • Then I caught a distant view of a herd of quadrupeds, rushing up and down the swells—animals, which would have still remained unknown and undescribed, had it not been for a most felicitous accident!
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Prairie
  • She seemed to him so felicitous a product of nature and circumstance that his invention, musing on future combinations, was constantly catching its breath with the fear of stumbling into some brutal compression or mutilation of her beautiful personal harmony.
    Henry James  --  The American
  • Stillwell said the names cowboys bestowed were felicitous, and as unchangeable as the everlasting hills; Florence went over to the enemy; and Alfred, laughing at Madeline’s protest, declared the cowboys had elected her queen of the ranges, and that there was no help for it.
    Zane Grey  --  The Light of Western Stars
  • There was a time, particularly during the gold rush to California, when the rough humor of the country showed itself in the invention of extravagant and often highly felicitous place-names, but with the growth of population and the rise of civic spirit they have tended to be replaced with more seemly coinages.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • "Truly, you did well," said the Marquis, felicitously sensible that such vermin were not to ruffle him, "to see a thief accompanying my carriage, and not open that great mouth of yours.
    Charles Dickens  --  A Tale of Two Cities
  • Felicitously he ceased and held a meek head among them, auk’s egg, prize of their fray.
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • But the Marquesa remained unaware of what had taken place; in fact she was quite pleased, for during the visit she had contrived a few felicitous phrases, phrases (who knows) that might bring a smile to her daughter’s face and might make her murmur: "Really, my mother is charming.
    Thornton Wilder  --  The Bridge of San Luis Rey
  • He looked clever and ill—a combination by no means felicitous; and he wore a brown velvet jacket.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1
  • He looked clever and ill—a combination by no means felicitous; and he wore a brown velvet jacket.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volumes 1 & 2
  • It expressed regrets and proposed remedies, which, when Mr. Brooke read them, seemed felicitously worded—surprisingly the right thing, and determined a sequel which he had never before thought of.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Emerson is not always felicitous in his choice of metaphors.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • This proposal seemed to Newman extremely felicitous; it revived his drooping spirit, and he reflected that Madame Urbain was not such a goose as she seemed.
    Henry James  --  The American
  • Her nose was swollen with grief and the pink tear stains marred her extraordinary beauty, but not so much that the beauty itself (including the mole, felicitously placed near the left eye, like a tiny satellite) failed to melt me on the spot—a distinct feeling of liquefaction emanating not from the heart’s region but, amazingly, from that of the stomach, which began to churn as if in revolt from a prolonged fast.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice
  • Possibly because this translation was felicitous and rich, or because Wolfe’s lyrical, tragic though optimistic and sweeping vision of America was what Sophie’s soul demanded at that moment—she being a newcomer to these shores, with only a rudimentary knowledge of the country’s landscape and its gargantuan extravagance—it was Of Time and the River that excited her the most of all the books she read that winter and spring.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice
  • The Countess gave rise indeed to some discussion between the mistress of the house and the visitor from Rome, in which Madame Merle (who was not such a fool as to irritate people by always agreeing with them) availed herself felicitously enough of that large licence of dissent which her hostess permitted as freely as she practised it.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volumes 1 & 2
  • …dusky corners, the deep embrasures and curious casements, the quiet light on dark, polished panels, the deep greenness outside, that seemed always peeping in, the sense of well-ordered privacy in the centre of a "property"—a place where sounds were felicitously accidental, where the tread was muffed by the earth itself and in the thick mild air all friction dropped out of contact and all shrillness out of talk—these things were much to the taste of our young lady, whose taste played a…
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1
  • …dusky corners, the deep embrasures and curious casements, the quiet light on dark, polished panels, the deep greenness outside, that seemed always peeping in, the sense of well-ordered privacy in the centre of a "property"—a place where sounds were felicitously accidental, where the tread was muffed by the earth itself and in the thick mild air all friction dropped out of contact and all shrillness out of talk—these things were much to the taste of our young lady, whose taste played a…
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volumes 1 & 2
  • The Countess gave rise indeed to some discussion between the mistress of the house and the visitor from Rome, in which Madame Merle (who was not such a fool as to irritate people by always agreeing with them) availed herself felicitously enough of that large licence of dissent which her hostess permitted as freely as she practised it.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1
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Associated words [difficulty]:   felicitous [6] , felicity [3]
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