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divest
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divest


The company divest itself of its South African holdings
  separate something from a person or firm — such as to sell, or take, or remove
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divest divestment divestiture divested divesting divests divesture
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Samples:
  • The company divest itself of its South African holdings
  • he was divested of his rights and his title
  • She divested herself of her outdoor clothes
  • Our proclivity to details cannot quite degrade our life and divest it of poetry.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo  --  Essays, Second Series

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  • It is an interesting question how far men would retain their relative rank if they were divested of their clothes.
    Henry David Thoreau
  • Slavery soon proved its ability to divest her of these heavenly qualities.
    Douglass, Frederick  --  Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass An American Slave
  • Traddles had to indicate that I was Mr. Copperfield, and I had to lay claim to myself, and they had to divest themselves of a preconceived opinion that Traddles was Mr. Copperfield...
    Dickens, Charles  --  David Copperfield
  • ...proceeded to divest himself of his Turkish garments, and invest himself with Christian attire.
    Dickens, Charles  --  Our Mutual Friend
  • That you divest yourself, and lay apart
    Shakespeare  --  King Henry V
  • She divested herself of her overalls, her only garment.
    Harper Lee  --  Go Set a Watchman

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  • But it is so bound up into the fabric and mood of that summer that to deprive this story of its reality would be like divesting a body of some member—not an essential member, but as important, say, as one of one’s more consequential fingers.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice
  • Divested of the bearskin, and with his grizzled locks neatly clubbed and laced back, MacRannoch was no longer the intimidating wildman of the forest, but appeared as a soberly clad man of late middle age, with a neatly trimmed spade-beard and a military bearing.
    Diana Gabaldon  --  Outlander
  • Slavery soon proved its ability to divest her of these heavenly qualities.
    Frederick Douglass  --  The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • And now it was, having fixed my resolution in so strong a manner, that nothing could divest my breast of its uncommon fury.
    Daniel Defoe  --  Robinson Crusoe
  • Miss Abbot turned to divest a stout leg of the necessary ligature.
    Charlotte Bronte  --  Jane Eyre
  • As for you, although we doctors cannot divest our patients of nerves, I fancy you have no further need of me than to recommend you not to allow your imagination to take too wide a field.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • Frowning with vexation at the effort necessary to divest himself of his coat and trousers, the prince undressed, sat down heavily on the bed, and appeared to be meditating as he looked contemptuously at his withered yellow legs.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  War and Peace
  • James had reappeared; he had divested himself of his trunk, owl, and trolley, and was evidently bursting with news.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
  • A halfcivilised ferocity lurked yet in the depressed brows and eyes full of black fire, but it was subdued; and his manner was even dignified: quite divested of roughness, though stern for grace.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • Finally, the Mohican himself reappeared, divested of all his attire, except his girdle and leggings, and with one-half of his fine features hid under a cloud of threatening black.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Last of the Mohicans
  • Back on board, the sailors helped divest us of our heavy copper carapaces.
    Jules Verne  --  Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea
  • He led them through the camp to a striped command tent where twenty or so miserable-looking men were divesting themselves of their arms and armor under the watchful eye of a dozen guards.
    Christopher Paolini  --  Eldest
  • It is an interesting question how far men would retain their relative rank if they were divested of their clothes.
    Henry David Thoreau  --  Walden
  • He, as soon as he saw himself clothed like one in his senses, and divested of the appearance of a madman, entreated the chaplain to permit him in charity to go and take leave of his comrades the madmen.
    Miguel de Cervantes  --  Don Quixote
  • And what preps Milkman for this change is a steady process of divestiture.
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • While he lived, it must be only an engagement; but she flattered herself, that if divested of the danger of drawing her away, it might become an increase of comfort to him.
    Jane Austen  --  Emma
  • He was divested of his clothes, except his shirt, whipped, and tied to a large tree in front of the house.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • CHAPTER SIXTEEN THE ALASKA INTERIOR I wished to acquire the simplicity, native feelings, and virtues of savage life; to divest myself of the factitious habits, prejudices and imperfections of civilization; . and to find, amidst the solitude and grandeur of the western wilds, more correct views of human nature and of the true interests of man.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild
  • Freeman’s Journal Loan (Stephen Dedalus) L. s. d. 0—4—9 1—7—6 1—7—0 2-19—3 Did the process of divestiture continue?
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • Here Mr. Wopsle was divesting himself of his Danish garments, and here there was just room for us to look at him over one another’s shoulders, by keeping the packing-case door, or lid, wide open.
    Charles Dickens  --  Great Expectations
  • —Tell me, my daughters,— Since now we will divest us both of rule, Interest of territory, cares of state,— Which of you shall we say doth love us most?
    William Shakespeare  --  King Lear
  • The provisions were eaten and gnawed, the potatoes thrown about, the milk drunk and spilt, every box had been peeped into, every pot and pan had been divested of its lid, the palisade round the hut had been partly destroyed, nothing had been left untouched.
    Johann Wyss  --  The Swiss Family Robinson
  • The morning before his flight, Mortenson drove Marina to work, then made his most difficult divestment.
    Greg Mortenson & David Oliver Relin  --  Three Cups of Tea
  • To divesting my closets and trunks of everything that was not essential to me.
    Anne Rice  --  Interview with the Vampire
  • Then the acolytes divested themselves of numerous packages from underneath their robes and piled them on the ground, out of reach of the slaves.
    Christopher Paolini  --  Brisingr
  • They entered the lobby already swarming with patrons, and then, after divesting themselves of their wraps, went into a sumptuous dining-room.
    Theodore Dreiser  --  Sister Carrie
  • "Ah, Messieurs! what can I say?" said the elder of the two ladies, as she stretched a pair of fine, aristocratic hands to the warmth of the blaze, and looked with unspeakable gratitude first at Lord Antony, then at one of the young men who had accompanied her party, and who was busy divesting himself of his heavy, caped coat.
    Baroness Orczy  --  The Scarlet Pimpernel
  • She replied with great earnestness that she would not think of giving that trouble, and on the instant divested herself of her bonnet and cloak in the passage.
    Thomas Hardy  --  The Mayor of Casterbridge
  • "Much obliged to you, ma’am!" says Mr. Guppy, divesting himself of his wet dreadnought in the hall.
    Charles Dickens  --  Bleak House
  • Even that night as he stumbled homewards along Jones’s Road he had felt that some power was divesting him of that sudden-woven anger as easily as a fruit is divested of its soft ripe peel.
    James Joyce  --  A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
  • Amory stepped inside and divested himself of cap and coat.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  This Side of Paradise
  • Sooner or later the divestiture of such a privileged innocence was inevitable, but when it finally happened the shock was magnified by the sheer superfluity of the carnage: all told, Everest killed twelve men and women in the spring of 1996, the worst single-season death toll since climbers first set foot on the peak seventy-five years ago.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into Thin Air
  • He accompanied me into Mr. Wickfield’s room, which was the shadow of its former self — having been divested of a variety of conveniences, for the accommodation of the new partner — and stood before the fire, warming his back, and shaving his chin with his bony hand, while Mr. Wickfield and I exchanged greetings.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • Except that I’d discovered that I was eager to divest myself of the gods’ attention as quickly as possible.
    Megan Whalen Turner  --  The Thief
  • With a swift movement the man divested himself of his loose Pierrot garb.
    Agatha Christie  --  Early Cases Of Hercule Poirot
  • Bob knew all about this particular affair, and spoke of the sport with an enthusiasm which no one who is not either divested of all manly feeling, or pitiably ignorant of rat-catching, can fail to imagine.
    George Eliot  --  The Mill on the Floss
  • But her biographers have erred in one direction as greatly as the Franciscan did in another; they have tried to invest her with a host of graces, to read back into her life and person some of the beauties that abound in her letters, whereas all real knowledge of this wonderful woman must proceed from the act of humiliating her and of divesting her of all beauties save one.
    Thornton Wilder  --  The Bridge of San Luis Rey
  • Mr Dowling was indeed very greatly affected with this relation; for he had not divested himself of humanity by being an attorney.
    Henry Fielding  --  Tom Jones
  • Its expression was now so vivid that for the first time he seemed to see before him the real Lily Bart, divested of the trivialities of her little world, and catching for a moment a note of that eternal harmony of which her beauty was a part.
    Edith Wharton  --  The House of Mirth
  • Just as the traditional rites of passage used to teach the individual to die to the past and be reborn to the future, so the great ceremonials of investiture divested him of his private character and clothed him in the mantle of his vocation.
    Joseph Campbell  --  The Hero With a Thousand Faces
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Associated words [difficulty]:   divest [5]
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