To see details on the word
avarice
please enable javascript.

avarice


We can try both to minimize greed and avarice and to channel them into directions beneficial to society.
  excessive desire for wealth
Home
 Mark word for later review on this computer
avarice avaricious avariciously avariciousness
Notes:
Like "greed", but implies greed for money. The early Christian Church counted avarice as one of the "seven deadly sins".
Web Links:
(try right-click if popups are disabled)
Dictionary - Vocabulary.com®
Dictionary/Synonyms - Google®
Dictionary List - OneLook®
Wikipedia: 7 Deadly Sins
Samples:
  • We can try both to minimize greed and avarice and to channel them into directions beneficial to society.
  • She was doomed to an empty life motivated by avarice.
  • I am here happily free from my miserable greatness with all its attendants of pride, ambition, avarice, and luxury,
    Daniel Defoe  --  Robinson Crusoe
  • Returning to the Indian, whose small, sharp eyes, glistening with avarice, betrayed that with him it was only a question of how great a price he could obtain.
    Jules Verne  --  Around the World in 80 Days

  • Show more
  • They knew his ignorance, his cruelty, his avarice, his appetites, his sins.
    John Steinbeck  --  The Pearl
  • ...and left him a fortune which to people of our modest bringing up is wealth beyond the dream of avarice, ...
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • Luxurious, avaricious, false, deceitful,
    Sudden, malicious, smacking of every sin
    William Shakespeare  --  Macbeth
  • I know my learned professors have found greater riches in the Iliad than I shall ever find; but I am not avaricious.
    Helen Keller  --  Story of My Life
  • Thus can I preach against the same vice
    Which that I use, and that is avarice.
    Geoffrey Chaucer  --  The Canterbury Tales
  • One day Tom was in the act of dosing the crack when his aunt’s yellow cat came along, purring, eying the teaspoon avariciously, and begging for a taste.
    Mark Twain  --  The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

  • Show more again
  • Gratitude looks to the past and love to the present; fear, avarice, lust, and ambition look ahead.
    C.S. Lewis  --  The Screwtape Letters
  • His face had not the harsh and rigid lines of later years; but it had begun to wear the signs of care and avarice.
    Charles Dickens  --  A Christmas Carol
  • It was just possible that the Marquesa de Montemayor was not a monster of avarice, and Uncle Pio of self-indulgence.
    Thornton Wilder  --  The Bridge of San Luis Rey
  • There is first to note that, whereas in other principalities the ambition of the nobles and the insolence of the people only have to be contended with, the Roman emperors had a third difficulty in having to put up with the cruelty and avarice of their soldiers,
    Nicolo Machiavelli  --  The Prince
  • The TV preachers peddled promises, and offered hope to people who had none. There would have been great good in that, I believe, if they had not followed every sermon with a request for a portion of their flock’s old-age pensions. Instead, it was an odd mix of good and evil, and people like my momma understood their avarice but forgave it, because the words the men spoke were comfort to her and their preaching was first-rate.
    Rick Bragg  --  All Over but the Shoutin’
  • But no the hand stayed, glowed, poisoned the air, hurrying the strange nun-Gypsy’s tread as she gasped her avaricious mouth most ardently.
    Ray Bradbury  --  Something Wicked This Way Comes
  • Freak keeps saying stuff like, "That’s the Castle of Avarice," and, "Yonder lies the Bloated Moat," and when we go under trees he’ll say, "Proceed with caution," or, "All clear," depending on how low the branches come down.
    Rodman Philbrick  --  Freak the Mighty
  • Compared to the drug offenders, the "white-collar" criminals had often demonstrated a lot more avarice, though their crimes were rarely glamorous—bank fraud, insurance fraud, credit card scams, check kiting.
    Piper Kerman  --  Orange Is the New Black
  • It was roughly four times what even the most avaricious moneylender would charge.
    Patrick Rothfuss  --  The Name of the Wind
  • On the floor beside the men was a brooch of glittering silver; a crimson-orange-banded stone, held in place with claws and with snake-heads, and the expression on the snake-heads was one of triumph and avarice and satisfaction.
    Neil Gaiman  --  The Graveyard Book
  • I always looked forward to these letters, feeling fortunate to have this Southern Lord Chesterfield as an advisor, who so delighted me with his old-fashioned disquisitions upon pride and avarice and ambition, bigotry, political skulduggery, venereal excess and other mortal sins and dangers.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice
  • I sit that way myself, the cold marbles rolling in between my legs, gathering in my outspread skirt, calling out cat’s eye, cat’s eye, in a regretful tone, feeling nothing but avarice and a pleasurable terror.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Cat’s Eye
  • With his impressive height and those broad, flat cheekbones, I could easily imagine him in command of a dragon ship, deepsunk eyes gleaming with avarice and lust as he peered through the fog at some rocky coastal village.
    Diana Gabaldon  --  Outlander
  • Where does discretion end, and avarice begin?
    Jane Austen  --  Pride and Prejudice
  • A Belgian newspaperman there recognized wit and raw avarice—a useful combination in any game.
    Barbara Kingsolver  --  The Poisonwood Bible
  • Ah, how strange it seems that such a young and beautiful woman should be so avaricious.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • Colonel Cathcart brightened instantly at the thought and began rubbing his hands with avaricious zest.
    Joseph Heller  --  Catch-22
  • And did you ever hear that my father was an avaricious, grasping man?
    Charlotte Bronte  --  Jane Eyre
  • As compared with their opposite numbers in past ages, they were less avaricious, less tempted by luxury, hungrier for pure power, and, above all, more conscious of what they were doing and more intent on crushing opposition.
    George Orwell  --  1984
  • Ill-treating the boys, you covetous, avaricious, in-sa-ti-a-ble old fence?’ said the man, seating himself deliberately.
    Charles Dickens  --  Oliver Twist
  • These priests are all thus, greedy and avaricious.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • I know he couldn’t love a Linton; and yet he’d be quite capable of marrying your fortune and expectations: avarice is growing with him a besetting sin.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • The king was winning; and as he was very avaricious, he was in an excellent humor.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Three Musketeers
  • Whether they were always so free from avarice, partialities, or want, that a bribe, or some other sinister view, could have no place among them?
    Jonathan Swift  --  Gulliver’s Travels
  • It was a simple quadrangular pyramid, set on a coral base, with no ironwork to tempt the natives’ avarice.
    Jules Verne  --  Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea
  • Jews, whom christians tax with avarice, are of all races the most given to intermarriage.
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • There is a phenomenal pride in it that excludes them from anything mercenary or avaricious.
    Herman Melville  --  Billy Budd
  • Humans are caught—in their lives, in their thoughts, in their hungers and ambitions, in their avarice and cruelty, and in their kindness and generosity too—in a net of good and evil.
    John Steinbeck  --  East of Eden
  • How I had a grasping, avaricious wish to shut out everybody from her but myself, and to be all in all to her, at that unseasonable time of all times.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • —Well may it be doubted; for, had I really loved, could I have sacrificed my feelings to vanity, to avarice?
    Jane Austen  --  Sense and Sensibility
  • The cricket cherished what avaricious secret: patiently sculptured what effigy of dread?
    James Agee  --  A Death in the Family
  • They both agreed in calling him an old screw; which means a very stingy, avaricious person.
    William Makepeace Thackeray  --  Vanity Fair
  • The man was of powerful frame, and too avaricious to part with his goods without a struggle.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Last of the Mohicans
  • "I would’t I might die now and live then!" interrupted Smug, the wheelwright, with a fine avaricious glow in his eye.
    Mark Twain  --  A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court
  • It was not in places of general resort, or where their equals were assembled, that any avaricious or malevolent noble durst offer him injury.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • I was just beginning to understand her avarice, her magic.
    Anne Rice  --  Interview with the Vampire
  • By avarice and selfishness, and a grovelling habit, from which none of us is free, of regarding the soil as property, or the means of acquiring property chiefly, the landscape is deformed, husbandry is degraded with us, and the farmer leads the meanest of lives.
    Henry David Thoreau  --  Walden
  • Temperance, for example, was by some confined to eating and drinking, while by others it was extended to mean the moderating every other pleasure, appetite, inclination, or passion, bodily or mental, even to our avarice and ambition.
    Benjamin Franklin  --  The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
  • I knew the law gave him power to fulfil it; for slaveholders have been cunning enough to enact that "the child shall follow the condition of the mother," not of the father, thus taking care that licentiousness shall not interfere with avarice.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • He grew avaricious and was impatient that the farm contained only six hundred acres.
    Sherwood Anderson  --  Winesburg, Ohio
Search for samples from other sources:
(try right-click if popups are disabled)
Interest -- Source
General -- Google News®
General -- Time® Magazine
General -- Twitter®
Associated words [difficulty]:   avarice [3]
     If popups are enabled: Search in OneLook®   If Flash® is also enabled: Search in Visuwords®
Most commonly used in these subjects:   Classic Literature, Philosophy, Religion & Spirtuality
Home
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading