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Richard III
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Richard III
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  • Shakespeare’s play, Richard III, is an unflattering depiction of his reign.
  • She’s a court lady in Richard III, and she’s the chief nun in Measure for Measure.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Cat’s Eye
  • Thus Richard III.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • "The first good town we come to we’ll hire a hall and do the sword fight in Richard III. and the balcony scene in Romeo and Juliet.
    Mark Twain  --  The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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  • They are generally Richard III. whales, with dromedary humps, and very savage; breakfasting on three or four sailor tarts, that is whaleboats full of mariners: their deformities floundering in seas of blood and blue paint.
    Herman Melville  --  Moby Dick
  • , Richard III.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • He had been born slightly crooked—a clumsy delivery by the midwife—like Richard III.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • I could have given you Richard III’s famous request for a horse from the time I was nine.
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • Richard III, I.iv. i95-97 199-200.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Deerslayer
  • You know Manningham’s story of the burgher’s wife who bade Dick Burbage to her bed after she had seen him in Richard III and how Shakespeare, overhearing, without more ado about nothing, took the cow by the horns and, when Burbage came knocking at the gate, answered from the capon’s blankets: William the conqueror came before Richard III.
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses

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  • There are all ages here: brown, wrinkled, white-haired dowagers who are able to go back, and still back, down the stream of time, and recall the crowning of Richard III. and the troublous days of that old forgotten age; and there are handsome middle-aged dames; and lovely and gracious young matrons; and gentle and beautiful young girls, with beaming eyes and fresh complexions, who may possibly put on their jewelled coronets awkwardly when the great time comes; for the matter will be…
    Mark Twain  --  The Prince and The Pauper
  • Richard III When the Black Knight—for it becomes necessary to resume the train of his adventures—left the Trysting-tree of the generous Outlaw, he held his way straight to a neighbouring religious house, of small extent and revenue, called the Priory of Saint Botolph, to which the wounded Ivanhoe had been removed when the castle was taken, under the guidance of the faithful Gurth, and the magnanimous Wamba.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • It does not seem to me so genuine grief when some tyrannous Richard III.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • In "Richard III" one finds "I never was /nor never/ will be"; in "Measure for Measure,"
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • The Life and Death of King Richard III by William Shakespeare [Collins edition] ACT I. SCENE I. London.
    William Shakespeare  --  The Life and Death of King Richard III
  • I daresay you remember that the Bishop of Ely’s house is mentioned in Shakespeare’s play of King Richard III.
    William Morris  --  News from Nowhere
  • During one two-month span in the winter of 1864, he saw Richard III, The Merchant of Venice, Hamlet, and, of course, Julius Caesar.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • Richard III, too, is delightful as the whimsical comedian who stops a funeral to make love to the corpse’s widow; but when, in the next act, he is replaced by a stage villain who smothers babies and offs with people’s heads, we are revolted at the imposture and repudiate the changeling.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Man And Superman
  • "I really believe," said he, "I could be fool enough at this moment to undertake any character that ever was written, from Shylock or Richard III down to the singing hero of a farce in his scarlet coat and cocked hat.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • Well, next they got out a couple of long swords that the duke made out of oak laths, and begun to practice the sword fight—the duke called himself Richard III.
    Mark Twain  --  The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • Also: The thrilling, masterly, and blood-curdling Broad-sword conflict In Richard III.
    Mark Twain  --  The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • Richard III.............Mr. Garrick

    (editor’s note:  This indicates that Mr. Garrick plays the role of Richard III.)
    Mark Twain  --  The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • He got out two or three curtain-calico suits, which he said was meedyevil armor for Richard III. and t’other chap, and a long white cotton nightshirt and a ruffled nightcap to match.
    Mark Twain  --  The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • A thoroughly unpleasant king, Richard III, rails against his situation by saying, his voice dripping with sarcasm, "Now is the winter of our discontent, / Made glorious summer by this son of York."
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • You know Manningham’s story of the burgher’s wife who bade Dick Burbage to her bed after she had seen him in Richard III and how Shakespeare, overhearing, without more ado about nothing, took the cow by the horns and, when Burbage came knocking at the gate, answered from the capon’s blankets: William the conqueror came before Richard III.
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • ] [Footnote 677: Richard III.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • Then she gets up and does a full court curtsy out of Richard III, with the women shoppers having tea in Murray’s gawking at her.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Cat’s Eye
  • An English king, the last of the Plantagenet line, the hero—or villain—of Shakespeare’s historical play, Richard III.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • SO IS Richard III (Shakespeare’s, not history’s).
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • But put that scoliosis on Richard III and, voila, you have something else entirely.
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • Consider some examples: Diomedes and Odysseus stealing the Thracian horses in The Iliad, the Lone Ranger waving from astride the rearing Silver, Richard III crying out for a horse, Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda roaring down the road on their choppersin Easy Rider.
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
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