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rationalism
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Sample Sentences Using
rationalism -- as in: rationalism v. empiricism
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  • Immanuel Kant attempted to integrate rationalism and empiricism.
  • Though a proponent of rationalism, Leibniz noted that "we are all mere Empirics in three fourths of our actions."
  • All words grouping themselves round the concepts of liberty and equality, for instance, were contained in the single word crimethink, while all words grouping themselves round the concepts of objectivity and rationalism were contained in the single word oldthink.
    George Orwell  --  1984
  • They, the impotent mystics, struggling to escape the responsibility of reason, had known that he, the rationalist, had undertaken to serve their whims.
    Ayn Rand  --  Atlas Shrugged

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  • This unshakable faith in human reason is called rationalism.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • But then it was Jose Arcadio Buendia who took the lead and tried to break down the priest’s faith with rationalist tricks.
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez  --  One Hundred Years of Solitude
  • Edgar was a rationalist, who was curious, and had a sort of scientific interest in life.
    D.H. Lawrence  --  Sons and Lovers
  • FOURTH PRIEST: Blessed! O blessed! (On his knees he goes over to Ork, seizes the old man’s head between his hands, and kisses him.) I feared for you, dear blessed Ork—I feared your bloodless rationalism.
    John Gardner  --  Grendel
  • There was a moment’s silence, such as often follows the triumph of rationalism.
    E.M. Forster  --  A Passage to India
  • When Christian ideas succumbed in the 18th century to rationalist ideas, feudal society fought its death battle with the then revolutionary bourgeoisie.
    Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels  --  The Communist Manifesto

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  • We obtained a sufficient foundation for it by throwing into the slough some editions of books of morality, volumes of French philosophy and German rationalism; tracts, sermons, and essays of modern clergymen; extracts from Plato, Confucius, and various Hindoo sages together with a few ingenious commentaries upon texts of Scripture,—all of which by some scientific process, have been converted into a mass like granite.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Celestial Railroad
  • In trying to produce the sensuous effects of opera, the fashionable drama has become so flaccid in its sentimentality, and the intellect of its frequenters so atrophied by disuse, that the reintroduction of problem, with its remorseless logic and iron framework of fact, inevitably produces at first an overwhelming impression of coldness and inhuman rationalism.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Mrs. Warren’s Profession
  • I, for instance, would not be in the least surprised if all of a sudden, A PROPOS of nothing, in the midst of general prosperity a gentleman with an ignoble, or rather with a reactionary and ironical, countenance were to arise and, putting his arms akimbo, say to us all: "I say, gentleman, hadn’t we better kick over the whole show and scatter rationalism to the winds, simply to send these logarithms to the devil, and to enable us to live once more at our own sweet foolish will!"
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  Notes from the Underground
  • Tilting his head to point at the Italian, he said with a drawl, "Just listen to our rationalist here, our Voltairian.
    Thomas Mann  --  The Magic Mountain
  • A rationalist is someone who believes that human reason is the primary source of our knowledge of the world.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • Like every aspect of Plato’s philosophy, his political philosophy is characterized by rationalism.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • With his unshakable faith in human reason he was decidedly a rationalist.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • They were all typical rationalists, convinced that reason was the only path to knowledge.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • We agreed that they had one important thing in common, namely, that they were both rationalists.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • The leading rationalists in the seventeenth century were Descartes, who was French; Spinoza, who was Dutch; and Leibniz, who was German.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • More people now emphasized that we cannot reach God through rationalism because God is in all ways unknowable.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • And a rationalist is someone who believes strongly in the importance of reason.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • In continuation of the idea of an unalterable ego, many rationalists had taken it for granted that man had an eternal soul.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • So we usually make a distinction between British empiricism and Continental rationalism.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • The rationalists had always held that the ability to distinguish between right and wrong is inherent in human reason.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • Remember that the rationalists believed that the basis for all human knowledge lay in the mind.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • I see now how he could think both the rationalists and the empiricists were right up to a point.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • Here the rationalists, like Descartes, had tried to prove that there must be a God simply because we have the idea of a ’supreme being.’
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • In this he agreed with the rationalists, who said the ability to distinguish between right and wrong is inherent in human reason.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • The next key word is rationalism.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • I thought rationalism went out with Hume.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • He was familiar both with the rationalism of Descartes and Spinoza and the empiricism of Locke, Berkeley, and Hume.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • Rationalist thinking of this kind was typical for philosophy of the seventeenth century.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • There were piles of old wreckage, both written and spoken, from the Middle Ages and the rationalist philosophy of the seventeenth century.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • Hume also rebelled against rationalist thought in the area of ethics.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • But—and here Kant stretches his hand out to the rationalists—in our reason there are also decisive factors that determine how we perceive the world around us.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • The rationalists had almost forgotten the importance of experience, and the empiricists had shut their eyes to the way our own mind influences the way we see the world.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • And finally we could perhaps say that Kant succeeded in showing the way out of the impasse that philosophy had reached in the struggle between rationalism and empiricism.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • But our watches do not always agree . Hilde read how Alberto told Sophie about the Renaissance and the new science, the seventeenth-century rationalists and British empiricism.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • That’s right, a rationalist believes in reason as the primary source of knowledge, and he may also believe that man has certain innate ideas that exist in the mind prior to all experience.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • But he thought the rationalists went too far in their claims as to how much reason can contribute, and he also thought the empiricists placed too much emphasis on sensory experience.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • Rationalism 3.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • Kant agreed with the rationalists in some things and with the empiricists in others.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • Man is not really such a rational creature as the eighteenth-century rationalists liked to think.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • You could, fr example, say that Descartes’s rationalism was a thesis—which was contradicted by Hume’s empirical antithesis.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • "What Herr Settembrini neglects to add," Naphta broke in, "is that the Rousseauian idyll is merely a rationalist’s bastardization of the Church’s doctrine of man’s original sinless, stateless condition, of his primal direct relationship to God as a child of God, to which condition he shall return.
    Thomas Mann  --  The Magic Mountain
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