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The Federalist Papers
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  • The Federalist leaders insisted the Embargo was an attempt by Jefferson to ruin New England prosperity, to provoke England to war, and to aid the French.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • I read some of The Federalist Papers as early prep for my government final.
    John Green  --  Paper Towns
  • I shall often have occasion to quote "The Federalist" in this work.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1
  • Afterwards I shouldered my magazines and trudged off to work, and Uncle Charlie poured himself another cup of coffee, rolled a new cigarette, and stretched out on the sofa to reread The Federalist Papers.
    Russell Baker  --  Growing Up

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  • I sat in the front of his class entranced as he spoke about the Constitutional Congress and the Federalist Papers, and their relevance to our existence today.
    Wes Moore  --  The Other Wes Moore
  • The federalist fervor, which the exiles had pictured as a powder keg about to explode, had dissolved into a vague electoral illusion.
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez  --  One Hundred Years of Solitude
  • As one of the principal authors, along with Madison, of the Federalist Papers, Hamilton ranked as a leading proponent of a strong central government, and his name was commonly linked with that of Madison, with whom he remained on friendly terms.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • They entitled their journal "The Federalist," a name which has been retained in the work.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1
  • The Federalist Repertory warned the faithful that the meeting represented nothing but an "irregular and tumultuous mode of proceeding," which "no just or honorable man" should attend.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • See also the analysis given of this constitution in "The Federalist" from No. 15 to No. 22, inclusive, and Story’s "Commentaries on the Constitution of the United States," pp. 85-115.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1

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  • "The Federalist" is an excellent book, which ought to be familiar to the statesmen of all countries, although it especially concerns America.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1
  • ] The Executive Power *p [Footnote p: See "The Federalist," Nos.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1
  • The Federalist Legislature convened at the end of May 1808, with—as the Massachusetts Republican Governor wrote Jefferson—but one "principal object—the political and even the personal destruction of John Quincy Adams."
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • I read from The Federalist Papers to prepare for a quiz I had the next day in government, but my mind kept returning to its continuous loop: Guthrie and Whitman and New York and Margo.
    John Green  --  Paper Towns
  • Later it would be learned that the idea that was working on him at the time was the unification of the federalist forms of Central America in order to wipe out conservative regimes from Alaska to Patagonia.
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez  --  One Hundred Years of Solitude
  • To Jefferson it was clear that Adams, who imagined he might "steer impartially between the parties," had been brought abruptly back into the Federalist fold.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Praise in the Federalist press, too, was not so much for Adams as for the occasion—"Thus ended a scene the parallel of which was never before witnessed in any country."
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • He was charged again and again as a creature of Hamilton and the Federalist war hawks.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Afterward, when Patrick Henry declined for reasons of health, Adams chose another southerner, the Federalist governor of North Carolina, William Davie.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • It was said that the whole XYZ story was a contrivance of the Federalist warmongers, that the breakdown of negotiations was the fault of the American envoys.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • In the last analysis, however, it was not Jefferson or the "dextrous" Burr who defeated Adams so much as the Federalist war faction and the rampaging Hamilton.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • The Federalist press protested the "damnable outrages" of the French, and a wave of patriotic anti-French anger swept the city and the country with unexpected passion.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • In two sweltering weeks, their popularity and confidence never higher, the Federalist majority in Congress passed into law extreme measures that Adams had not asked for or encouraged.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • The stories spread rapidly, appearing in the Federalist press—the New York Evening Post, the Washington Federalist, the Gazette of theUnited States, and in Boston in the Gazette and the Columbian Centinel, papers read by the Adamses.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • The Federalist press declared the United States had been grievously insulted by France; the Republican press affirmed American friendship with the French and, while expressing the hope that the President would remain true to his inaugural pledge to seek peace, reported that a "certain ex-Secretary" (Hamilton) was secretly preaching war to further his political ambitions.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • *o [Footnote o: See "The Federalist," Nos.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1
  • "The Federalist" (No.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1
  • ] [Footnote g: It is thus that "The Federalist," No. 45, explains the division of supremacy between the Union and the States: "The powers delegated by the Constitution to the Federal Government are few and defined.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1
  • *o [Footnote o: At this time Alexander Hamilton, who was one of the principal founders of the Constitution, ventured to express the following sentiments in "The Federalist," No. 71:— "There are some who would be inclined to regard the servile pliancy of the Executive to a prevailing current, either in the community or in the Legislature, as its best recommendation.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1
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