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Animal Farm
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Sample Sentences Using
Animal Farm
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  • George Orwell’s Animal Farm (1945) is popular among many readers precisely because it’s relatively easy to figure out what it all means.
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • Instead of coming home during the summers like most students, she takes additional classes with the intention of graduating early and spends her afternoons working at a place called Animal Farm.
    Nicholas Sparks  --  The Wedding
  • We were working on Animal Farm, an easy subject matter.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  New Moon
  • By the late summer the news of what had happened on Animal Farm had spread across half the county.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm

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  • These Seven Commandments would now be inscribed on the wall; they would form an unalterable law by which all the animals on Animal Farm must live for ever after.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • It was lucky that the owners of the two farms which adjoined Animal Farm were on permanently bad terms.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • At the graveside Snowball made a little speech, emphasising the need for all animals to be ready to die for Animal Farm if need be.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • This morning I saw you looking over the hedge that divides Animal Farm from Foxwood.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • Nevertheless, they were both thoroughly frightened by the rebellion on Animal Farm, and very anxious to prevent their own animals from learning too much about it.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • Then Snowball (for it was Snowball who was best at writing) took a brush between the two knuckles of his trotter, painted out MANOR FARM from the top bar of the gate and in its place painted ANIMAL FARM.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm

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  • When time passed and the animals had evidently not starved to death, Frederick and Pilkington changed their tune and began to talk of the terrible wickedness that now flourished on Animal Farm.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • Early in October, when the corn was cut and stacked and some of it was already threshed, a flight of pigeons came whirling through the air and alighted in the yard of Animal Farm in the wildest excitement.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • They put it about that the animals on the Manor Farm (they insisted on calling it the Manor Farm; they would not tolerate the name ’Animal Farm’) were perpetually fighting among themselves and were also rapidly starving to death.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • In glowing sentences he painted a picture of Animal Farm as it might be when sordid labour was lifted from the animals’ backs.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • Napoleon ended his speech with his usual cry of ’Long live Animal Farm!’ and after the singing of Beasts of England the animals were dismissed.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • The human beings did not hate Animal Farm any less now that it was prospering; indeed, they hated it more than ever.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • One symptom of this was that they had begun to call Animal Farm by its proper name and ceased to pretend that it was called the Manor Farm.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • Emboldened by the collapse of the windmill, the human beings were inventing fresh lies about Animal Farm.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • He was deceived, and continued to report to the outside world that there was no food shortage on Animal Farm.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • Long live Animal Farm!
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • At the same time there were renewed rumours that Frederick and his men were plotting to attack Animal Farm and to destroy the windmill, the building of which had aroused furious jealousy in him.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • A Mr. Whymper, a solicitor living in Willingdon, had agreed to act as intermediary between Animal Farm and the outside world, and would visit the farm every Monday morning to receive his instructions.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • From now onwards Animal Farm would engage in trade with the neighbouring farms: not, of course, for any commercial purpose, but simply in order to obtain certain materials which were urgently necessary.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • In its place Minimus, the poet, had composed another song which began: Animal Farm, Animal Farm, Never through me shalt thou come to harm! and this was sung every Sunday morning after the hoisting of the flag.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • In its place Minimus, the poet, had composed another song which began: Animal Farm, Animal Farm, Never through me shalt thou come to harm! and this was sung every Sunday morning after the hoisting of the flag.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • At about the same time it was given out that Napoleon had arranged to sell the pile of timber to Mr. Pilkington; he was also going to enter into a regular agreement for the exchange of certain products between Animal Farm and Foxwood.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • Frederick, it was said, intended to bring against them twenty men all armed with guns, and he had already bribed the magistrates and police, so that if he could once get hold of the title-deeds of Animal Farm they would ask no questions.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • He was a sly-looking little man with side whiskers, a solicitor in a very small way of business, but sharp enough to have realised earlier than anyone else that Animal Farm would need a broker and that the commissions would be worth having.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • Have we not driven the enemy off our soil — the sacred soil of Animal Farm?
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • In April, Animal Farm was proclaimed a Republic, and it became necessary to elect a President.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • More, they never lost, even for an instant, their sense of honour and privilege in being members of Animal Farm.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • Today he and his friends had visited Animal Farm and inspected every inch of it with their own eyes, and what did they find?
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • He believed that he was right in saying that the lower animals on Animal Farm did more work and received less food than any animals in the county.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • ’Gentlemen,’ concluded Mr. Pilkington, ’gentlemen, I give you a toast: To the prosperity of Animal Farm!’
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • Mr. Pilkington had referred throughout to ’Animal Farm.’
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • He could not of course know — for he, Napoleon, was only now for the first time announcing it — that the name ’Animal Farm’ had been abolished.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • Long live Animal Farm!
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • He would end his remarks, he said, by emphasising once again the friendly feelings that subsisted, and ought to subsist, between Animal Farm and its neighbours.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • Without any further prompting they confessed that they had been secretly in touch with Snowball ever since his expulsion, that they had collaborated with him in destroying the windmill, and that they had entered into an agreement with him to hand over Animal Farm to Mr. Frederick.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • Most of Animal Farm was within their view — the long pasture stretching down to the main road, the hayfield, the spinney, the drinking pool, the ploughed fields where the young wheat was thick and green, and the red roofs of the farm buildings with the smoke curling from the chimneys.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • Napoleon had commanded that once a week there should be held something called a Spontaneous Demonstration, the object of which was to celebrate the struggles and triumphs of Animal Farm.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • This bon mot set the table in a roar; and Mr. Pilkington once again congratulated the pigs on the low rations, the long working hours, and the general absence of pampering which he had observed on Animal Farm.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • At the same time Napoleon assured the animals that the stories of an impending attack on Animal Farm were completely untrue, and that the tales about Frederick’s cruelty to his own animals had been greatly exaggerated.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • Except through Whymper, there was as yet no contact between Animal Farm and the outside world, but there were constant rumours that Napoleon was about to enter into a definite business agreement either with Mr. Pilkington of Foxwood or with Mr. Frederick of Pinchfield — but never, it was noticed, with both simultaneously.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • At the beginning, when the laws of Animal Farm were first formulated, the retiring age had been fixed for horses and pigs at twelve, for cows at fourteen, for dogs at nine, for sheep at seven, and for hens and geese at five.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • There had been a time — not that he, or any of the present company, had shared such sentiments — but there had been a time when the respected proprietors of Animal Farm had been regarded, he would not say with hostility, but perhaps with a certain measure of misgiving, by their human neighbours.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
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