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Middlemarch
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Sample Sentences Using
Middlemarch
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  • Many authors consider Eliot’s Middlemarch to be among the best books ever written.
  • GEORGE ELIOT, Middlemarch, lxxvi.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • An hour later, Spencer sat at the kitchen table reading Middlemarch—a book on the English AP "suggested reading" list—when she began to sneeze.
    Sara Shepard  --  Pretty Little Liars
  • Who was it that sold his bit of land to the Papists at Middlemarch?
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch

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  • The box was full of things he had been waiting for impatiently; a new volume of Herbert Spencer, another collection of the prolific Alphonse Daudet’s brilliant tales, and a novel called "Middlemarch," as to which there had lately been interesting things said in the reviews.
    Edith Wharton  --  The Age of Innocence
  • In "Romeo and Juliet" Juliet has to be important, just as, in "Adam Bede" and "The Mill on the Floss" and "Middlemarch" and "Daniel Deronda," Hetty Sorrel and Maggie Tulliver and Rosamond Vincy and Gwendolen Harleth have to be; with that much of firm ground, that much of bracing air, at the disposal all the while of their feet and their lungs.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volumes 1 & 2
  • Elmos/ and ten /Ivanhoes/, but only one /Middlemarch/.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • "If you two don’t mind, I’ll continue reading him some Middlemarch," she said.
    Henry H. Neff  --  The Maelstrom
  • They had finished Middlemarch in a week and it had given them plenty to discuss.
    Abraham Verghese  --  Cutting for Stone
  • In "Romeo and Juliet" Juliet has to be important, just as, in "Adam Bede" and "The Mill on the Floss" and "Middlemarch" and "Daniel Deronda," Hetty Sorrel and Maggie Tulliver and Rosamond Vincy and Gwendolen Harleth have to be; with that much of firm ground, that much of bracing air, at the disposal all the while of their feet and their lungs.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1

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  • She was by way of being terrified of him—he was so fearfully clever, and the first night when she had sat by him, and he talked about George Eliot, she had been really frightened, for she had left the third volume of MIDDLEMARCH in the train and she never knew what happened in the end; but afterwards she got on perfectly, and made herself out even more ignorant than she was, because he liked telling her she was a fool.
    Virginia Woolf  --  To the Lighthouse
  • For if PRIDE AND PREJUDICE matters, and MIDDLEMARCH and VILLETTE and WUTHERING HEIGHTS matter, then it matters far more than I can prove in an hour’s discourse that women generally, and not merely the lonely aristocrat shut up in her country house among her folios and her flatterers, took to writing.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • Her bookmark was soon ahead of his in Middlemarch, and she was on Zola before he was done.
    Abraham Verghese  --  Cutting for Stone
  • Brooke standing for Middlemarch?
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Middlemarch.
    Abraham Verghese  --  Cutting for Stone
  • I accused him of meaning to stand for Middlemarch on the Liberal side, and he looked silly and never denied it—talked about the independent line, and the usual nonsense.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • For who of any consequence in Middlemarch was not connected or at least acquainted with the Vincys?
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Well, my dear, you will not find any Middlemarch young man who has not something against him.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • But I shall not marry any Middlemarch young man.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Rosamond felt that she might have been happier if she had not been the daughter of a Middlemarch manufacturer.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Only a few children in Middlemarch looked blond by the side of Rosamond, and the slim figure displayed by her riding-habit had delicate undulations.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • In fact, most men in Middlemarch, except her brothers, held that Miss Vincy was the best girl in the world, and some called her an angel.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • "Middlemarch has not a very high standard, uncle," said Rosamond, with a pretty lightness, going towards her whip, which lay at a distance.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Ever since that important new arrival in Middlemarch she had woven a little future, of which something like this scene was the necessary beginning.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • "The standard of that profession is low in Middlemarch, my dear sir," said the banker.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • "I have not yet been pained by finding any excessive talent in Middlemarch," said Lydgate, bluntly.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • I couldn’t foresee everything in the trade; there wasn’t a finer business in Middlemarch than ours, and the lad was clever.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Still, I repeat, there was a general impression that Lydgate was something rather more uncommon than any general practitioner in Middlemarch.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Does it seem incongruous to you that a Middlemarch surgeon should dream of himself as a discoverer?
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • He would be a good Middlemarch doctor, and by that very means keep himself in the track of far-reaching investigation.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Such was Lydgate’s plan of his future: to do good small work for Middlemarch, and great work for the world.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Middlemarch, in fact, counted on swallowing Lydgate and assimilating him very comfortably.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Yes, and you will find Middlemarch very tuneless.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • It was the pleasantest family party that Lydgate had seen since he came to Middlemarch.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • "You will not like us at Middlemarch, I feel sure," she said, when the whist-players were settled.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • I have made up my mind to take Middlemarch as it comes, and shall be much obliged if the town will take me in the same way.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • It was the oldest church in Middlemarch; the living, however, was but a vicarage worth barely four hundred a-year.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • That would be good discipline, you know, for a young doctor who has to please his patients in Middlemarch.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • There was a billiard-room at the Green Dragon, which some anxious mothers and wives regarded as the chief temptation in Middlemarch.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • The affair of the chaplaincy remained a sore point in his memory as a case in which this petty medium of Middlemarch had been too strong for him.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • However, Lydgate was installed as medical attendant on the Vincys, and the event was a subject of general conversation in Middlemarch.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • At ten o’clock supper was brought in (such were the customs of Middlemarch) and there was punch-drinking; but Mr. Farebrother had only a glass of water.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Regarding themselves as Middlemarch institutions, they were ready to combine against all innovators, and against non-professionals given to interference.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • She was not without her criticism of them in return, being more accurately instructed than most matrons in Middlemarch, and—where is the blameless woman?
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • This was one of the difficulties of moving in good Middlemarch society: it was dangerous to insist on knowledge as a qualification for any salaried office.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • "Ah, here’s Minchin!" said Mr. Frank Hawley; at which everybody turned away from Mr. Hackbutt, leaving him to feel the uselessness of superior gifts in Middlemarch.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • The man was still in the making, as much as the Middlemarch doctor and immortal discoverer, and there were both virtues and faults capable of shrinking or expanding.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • The creditor was Mr. Bambridge a horse-dealer of the neighborhood, whose company was much sought in Middlemarch by young men understood to be "addicted to pleasure."
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Really, the men in Middlemarch, except Mr. Farebrother, were great bores, and Lydgate did not care about commercial politics or cards: what was he to do for relaxation?
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • He’ll never have much to leave you: he’ll most-like die without a will—he’s the sort of man to do it—let ’cause make him mayor of Middlemarch as much as they like.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
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