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Walter Scott
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Walter Scott
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  • Walter Scott’s poem, The Lady of the Lake, is largely forgotten, but has influenced familiar aspects of Western culture.
  • "What, you don’t mean the Walter Scott?"
    Mark Twain  --  The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • [7] [7] Walter Scott, Lamartine, Vaulabelle, Charras, Quinet, Thiers.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • James Fenimore Cooper, Sir Walter Scott, Dickens, William Dean Howells.
    David Guterson  --  Snow Falling on Cedars

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  • He asked us whether we had read the poetry of Thomas Moore or the works of Sir Walter Scott and Lord Lytton.
    James Joyce  --  Dubliners
  • He had been in People (first best-seller) and Us (first divorce); there had been a question about him one Sunday in Walter Scott’s Personality Parade.
    Stephen King  --  Misery
  • Through Walter Scott, later on, she fell in love with historical events, dreamed of old chests, guard-rooms and minstrels.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • IVANHOE A ROMANCE By Sir Walter Scott Now fitted the halter, now traversed the cart, And often took leave,—but seemed loath to depart!
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • But I had all of Shakespeare and Walter Scott and Dickens and Fenimore Cooper.
    Katherine Paterson  --  Jacob Have I Loved
  • Everywhere was a Walter Scott heroine being loved by men with helmets or with plumes in their caps.
    D.H. Lawrence  --  Sons and Lovers

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  • You might like to read Mrs. Moodie’s poem ’The Maniac,’ if you are an aficionado of Sir Walter Scott.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Alias Grace
  • And I had to make up some beggarly story to that English surgeon why I did not return his Walter Scott to him.
    Edward E. Hale  --  The Man Without a Country
  • She had read them Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe when Jeff and Johnny were six and seven, respectively.
    Larry McMurtry  --  Lonesome Dove
  • "But Sir Walter Scott—I suppose Mr. Lydgate knows him," said young Plymdale, a little cheered by this advantage.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Today I would like to recite to you a poem by Sir Walter Scott entitled lochinvar.’
    Arundhati Roy  --  The God of Small Things
  • Then her brain would be busy with wild romances of a flight from home in search of something less sordid and dreary; she would go to some great man—Walter Scott, perhaps—and tell him how wretched and how clever she was, and he would surely do something for her.
    George Eliot  --  The Mill on the Floss
  • There was a crude bookshelf made of three shingles strung together over the desk and I looked at the books, Byron’s poems, novels by Sir Walter Scott, Confessions of an Opium Eater, some shabby brown volumes, and on the last shelf, Lift and Letters of …. The rest was eaten away.
    Jean Rhys  --  Wide Sargasso Sea
  • He was sure Pansy had never looked at a newspaper and that, in the way of novels, if she had read Sir Walter Scott it was the very most.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volumes 1 & 2
  • He was sure Pansy had never looked at a newspaper and that, in the way of novels, if she had read Sir Walter Scott it was the very most.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 2
  • Chivalry[373] is that, and loyalty is that, and, in English literature, half the drama, and all the novels, from Sir Philip Sidney[374] to Sir Walter Scott,[375] paint this figure.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • He had taken up reading modern epic poems and novels, "romances," he reported to Rush—Walter Scott’s Lady of the Lake, Jane Porter’s Scottish Chiefs—and was finding great enjoyment in them.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Wilson, for instance, who despised "college professors" and their tastes, tackled the problem of the "boring" modern story at great and lucid length, ending with the intriguing conclusion that each age has its own acceptable boredoms, with Joyce’s boredoms being no greater than Sir Walter Scott’s.
    Adam Gopnik  --  Can Science Explain Why We Tell Stories?
  • They are typical, none the less, of a class difficult, in the individual case, to make a centre of interest; so difficult in fact that many an expert painter, as for instance Dickens and Walter Scott, as for instance even, in the main, so subtle a hand as that of R. L. Stevenson, has preferred to leave the task unattempted.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1
  • The Romantic movement of the 1820s brought back a yearning for narrow-waisted heroines like the ones in the novels of Sir Walter Scott (the Dan Brown of his day—though Sir Walter would not have dared dress a French heroine in a big sweater and black leggings, as Mr. Brown did poor Sophie Neveu inThe Da Vinci Code ), and corsets gained popularity while skirts became wider.
    Meg Cabot  --  Queen of Babble
  • Although her fits had passed off, she was in every other way her old self: when Sir Walter Scott became involved in lengthy descriptions of moats and castles, Mrs. Dubose would become bored and pick on us: "Jeremy Finch, I told you you’d live to regret tearing up my camellias.
    Harper Lee  --  To Kill a Mockingbird
  • "It was the tide, merely the tide, which wellnigh caught us by surprise just as it did Sir Walter Scott’s hero!
    Jules Verne  --  Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea
  • Cranly smiled and said kindly: —The captain has only one love: sir Walter Scott.
    James Joyce  --  A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
  • …Arthur, The Cid, Roland at Roncesvalles, the Nibelungen, The troubadours, minstrels, minnesingers, skalds, Chaucer, Dante, flocks of singing birds, The Border Minstrelsy, the bye-gone ballads, feudal tales, essays, plays, Shakespere, Schiller, Walter Scott, Tennyson, As some vast wondrous weird dream-presences, The great shadowy groups gathering around, Darting their mighty masterful eyes forward at thee, Thou! with as now thy bending neck and head, with courteous hand and word,…
    Walt Whitman  --  Leaves of Grass
  • He said he had all Sir Walter Scott’s works and all Lord Lytton’s works at home and never tired of reading them.
    James Joyce  --  Dubliners
  • Among these I found a few paper-covered books, the pages of which were curled and damp: The Abbot, by Walter Scott, The Devout Communicant and The Memoirs of Vidocq.
    James Joyce  --  Dubliners
  • She felt herself transported to the reading of her youth, into the midst of Walter Scott.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • He looks surprised to hear me use such an expression; but that’s only because he doesn’t remember that I have read the poetry of Sir Walter Scott.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Alias Grace
  • They are typical, none the less, of a class difficult, in the individual case, to make a centre of interest; so difficult in fact that many an expert painter, as for instance Dickens and Walter Scott, as for instance even, in the main, so subtle a hand as that of R. L. Stevenson, has preferred to leave the task unattempted.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volumes 1 & 2
  • But I did what I could; a man can but do his best, as Walter Scott has remarked somewhere.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Alias Grace
  • There is no writer can touch sir Walter Scott.
    James Joyce  --  A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
  • Sir Walter Scott, a famous Scotch author.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • [Note 7:] — The "Lay of the Last Minstrel" is one of the best poems of Walter Scott.
    Edward E. Hale  --  The Man Without a Country
  • The Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, a collection of original and collected poems, published by Sir Walter Scott in 1802.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • On the table beside his reading chair were the latest novels of Walter Scott and James Fenimore Cooper, the sermons of Bishop Joseph Butler, along with Pascal’s Provincial Letters.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Then Nancy said he lacked a proper feeling; and Mr. Kinnear said no, he did not, but it was well known that Sir Walter Scott had put so many corpses into his books for the sake of the ladies, because the ladies must have blood, there is nothing delights them so much as a weltering corpse.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Alias Grace
  • And she was afraid lest this boy, who, nevertheless, looked something like a Walter Scott hero, who could paint and speak French, and knew what algebra meant, and who went by train to Nottingham every day, might consider her simply as the swine-girl, unable to perceive the princess beneath; so she held aloof.
    D.H. Lawrence  --  Sons and Lovers
  • She’d taken a copy of The Lady of the Lake by Sir Walter Scott out of the library where they had five of them, and she was reading it out loud to me; and she had a store of candle-ends which she’d taken one by one from the dining room, and she kept them hidden under a loose floorboard; and if she’d had them by permission, she wouldn’t have done so.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Alias Grace
  • "If madame will do me the honour of making use of it", said the chemist, who had just caught the last words, "I have at her disposal a library composed of the best authors, Voltaire, Rousseau, Delille, Walter Scott, the ’Echo des Feuilletons’; and in addition I receive various periodicals, among them the ’Fanal de Rouen’ daily, having the advantage to be its correspondent for the districts of Buchy, Forges, Neufchatel, Yonville, and vicinity."
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • They numbered scarce eight summers when a name Rose on their souls and stirred such motions there As thrill the buds and shape their hidden frame At penetration of the quickening air: His name who told of loyal Evan Dhu, Of quaint Bradwardine, and Vich Ian Vor, Making the little world their childhood knew Large with a land of mountain lake and scaur, And larger yet with wonder love belief Toward Walter Scott who living far away Sent them this wealth of joy and noble grief.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • "It is by the author of ’Waverley’: that is Sir Walter Scott.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • )] [Footnote 375: Sir Walter Scott.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
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