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Madame Bovary
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Madame Bovary
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  • In Madame Bovary, Emma represents the romantic who this realistic novel discredits.
  • The novel which he esteemed above all others, he said, was Madame Bovary, not alone because of its formal perfection but because of the resolution of the suicide motif; Emma’s death by self-poisoning seeming to be so beautifully inevitable as to become one of the supreme emblems, in Western literature, of the human condition.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice
  • Hayward talked of Richard Feverel and Madame Bovary, of Verlaine, Dante, and Matthew Arnold.
    W. Somerset Maugham  --  Of Human Bondage
  • I’m reading Madame Bovary in French now, grievously, very grievously.
    Christina Garcia  --  Dreaming in Cuban

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  • Gustave Flaubert Paris, 12 April 1857 MADAME BOVARY
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Thus, though we do not know what Shakespeare went through when he wrote LEAR, we do know what Carlyle went through when he wrote the FRENCH REVOLUTION; what Flaubert went through when he wrote MADAME BOVARY; what Keats was going through when he tried to write poetry against the coming death and the indifference of the world.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • Madame Bovary bit her lips, and the child knocked about the village.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Madame Bovary took strong steps.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • It was a dark night; Madame Bovary junior was afraid of accidents for her husband.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Old Rouault, with a new silk hat and the cuffs of his black coat covering his hands up to the nails, gave his arm to Madame Bovary senior.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary

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  • Madame Bovary, senior, had not opened her mouth all day.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Madame Bovary noticed that many ladies had not put their gloves in their glasses.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • At the crash of the glass Madame Bovary turned her head and saw in the garden the faces of peasants pressed against the window looking in at them.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • When Madame Bovary looked up, she always saw him there, like a sentinel on duty, with his skullcap over his ears and his vest of lasting.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • When they left Tostes at the month of March, Madame Bovary was pregnant.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Madame Bovary’s greyhound had run across the field.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • When Madame Bovary was in the kitchen she went up to the chimney.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • "At any rate, you have some walks in the neighbourhood?" continued Madame Bovary, speaking to the young man.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • "Ah! don’t you listen to him, Madame Bovary," interrupted Homais, bending over his plate.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Unconsciously, Leon, while talking, had placed his foot on one of the bars of the chair on which Madame Bovary was sitting.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Madame Lefrancois was asleep near the cinders, while the stable-boy, lantern in hand, was waiting to show Monsieur and Madame Bovary the way home.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • But Madame Bovary, senior, cried out loudly against this name of a sinner.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Madame Bovary said she was going to see her baby, but that she was beginning to grow tired.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • When they arrived in front of her garden, Madame Bovary opened the little gate, ran up the steps and disappeared.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Madame Bovary examined them.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Well, good-bye, Madame Bovary.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • The conversation languished; Madame Bovary gave it up every few minutes, whilst he himself seemed quite embarrassed.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • When visitors called, Felicite brought her in, and Madame Bovary undressed her to show off her limbs.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • "Where is the cure?" asked Madame Bovary of one of the lads, who was amusing himself by shaking a swivel in a hole too large for it.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • But as soon as he caught sight of Madame Bovary, "Excuse me," he said; "I did not recognise you."
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • You must get home, Madame Bovary; drink a little tea, that will strengthen you, or else a glass of fresh water with a little moist sugar.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • They had all, Monsieur and Madame Bovary, Homais, and Monsieur Leon, gone to see a yarn-mill that was being built in the valley a mile and a half from Yonville.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • To attain her ends Madame Bovary had to oust them all, and she even succeeded in very cleverly baffling the intrigues of a port-butcher backed up by the priests.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • She now let everything in her household take care of itself, and Madame Bovary senior, when she came to spend part of Lent at Tostes, was much surprised at the change.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • That same evening this was known in Yonville, and Madame Tuvache, the mayor’s wife, declared in the presence of her servant that "Madame Bovary was compromising herself."
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • For a long time Madame Bovary had been on the look-out for his death, and the old fellow had barely been packed off when Charles was installed, opposite his place, as his successor.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • As soon as he heard the bell he ran to meet Madame Bovary, took her shawl, and put away under the shop-counter the thick list shoes that she wore over her boots when there was snow.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • On Wednesday at three o’clock, Monsieur and Madame Bovary, seated in their dog-cart, set out for Vaubyessard, with a great trunk strapped on behind and a bonnet-box in front of the apron.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • His mother approved of his economy, for she came to see him as formerly when there had been some violent row at her place; and yet Madame Bovary senior seemed prejudiced against her daughter-in-law.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • "If you were like me," said Charles, "constantly obliged to be in the saddle"— "But," Leon went on, addressing himself to Madame Bovary, "nothing, it seems to me, is more pleasant—when one can," he added.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Madame Bovary was lavish of them; and the words "daughter" and "mother" were exchanged all day long, accompanied by little quiverings of the lips, each one uttering gentle words in a voice trembling with anger.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • "And then, does it not seem to you," continued Madame Bovary, "that the mind travels more freely on this limitless expanse, the contemplation of which elevates the soul, gives ideas of the infinite, the ideal?"
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Then Madame Bovary, senior, became alarmed for her son’s happiness, and fearing that her husband might in the long-run have an immoral influence upon the ideas of the young woman, took care to hurry their departure.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • During the first period of Charles’s visits to the Bertaux, Madame Bovary junior never failed to inquire after the invalid, and she had even chosen in the book that she kept on a system of double entry a clean blank page for Monsieur Rouault.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Madame Bovary did not go downstairs to the dining-room; she wished to remain alone to look after the child.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • As he came in, Madame Bovary arose hurriedly.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Madame Bovary had opened her window overlooking the garden and watched the clouds.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • "Do you know what your wife wants?" replied Madame Bovary senior.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Madame Bovary left on a Wednesday, the market-day at Yonville.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Madame Bovary began taking off his cravat.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
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