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John Adams
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John Adams
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  • Many credit John Adams for avoiding a full-scale war with France at the end of the 18th century.
  • -LETTER FROM JOHN ADAMS TO HIS WIFE, ABIGAIL
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  Chains
  • But—leaving them to study a portrait of John Adams near the coat check, where they were waiting for Mrs. DeFrees to drop off her mink, and making my way through the crowded rooms—there was no one I recognized except Mrs. Barbour, whom I really didn’t feel I could face, only she saw me before I could get by and caught me by the sleeve.
    Donna Tartt  --  The Goldfinch
  • It was here, Robert, at the very core of this young American nation, that our brightest forefathers—John Adams, Ben Franklin, Thomas Paine—all warned of the profound dangers of interpreting the Bible literally.
    Dan Brown  --  The Lost Symbol

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  • But there was only one Federalist politician whose opinion young John Quincy valued above his own—John Adams.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • John Adams, Dr. Benjamin Rush, and other important men met at the London Coffee House to discuss revolutionary strategies.
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  Fever, 1793
  • For the purpose of that book, I studied the history of Miranda’s attempt against Spain, and of John Adams’s preparations for a descent of the Mississippi River.
    Edward E. Hale  --  The Man Without a Country
  • John Adams to Abigail Adams, 1774.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • John Adams once described being in the position as "I am nothing."
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Kennedy
  • Emerson may have in mind, however, John Adams (1735-1826), second president of the United States.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays

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  • Curiously and remarkably, John Adams, the future president, foresaw the role of American English even before he knew that the American Revolution would succeed.
    Robert MacNeil and William Crane  --  Do You Speak American?
  • Whatever he lacked in knowledge or experience, he tried to make up for with "watchfulness and industry," he would later confide to John Adams.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • The /British Critic/ attacked it in November, 1793, and it also had enemies at home, but John Adams had used it in his diary in 1759 and the authority of Jefferson and Hamilton was behind it, and so it survived.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • John Adams, our second president, said, "Statesmen . may plan and speculate for Liberty, but it is Religion and Morality alone, which can establish the Principles upon which Freedom can securely stand."
    Phil Robertson  --  Happy, Happy, Happy: My Life and Legacy as the Duck Commander
  • —LETTER OF WILLIAM TUDOR, WASHINGTON’S CHIEF LEGAL OFFICER, TO JOHN ADAMS
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  Chains
  • At the time when John Adams had a little army at Cincinnati, ready to go down and take New Orleans, there were no Western correspondents to the Eastern Press.
    Edward E. Hale  --  The Man Without a Country
  • John Adams, who had put Washington’s name in nomination for the command, described him in a letter to his wife Abigail as amiable and brave.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • He was John Adams of Braintree and he loved to talk.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • John Hancock, the President of the Continental Congress, was thirty-nine, John Adams, forty, Thomas Jefferson, thirty-two, younger even than the young Rhode Island general.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • John Adams, who had come to know Reed in Philadelphia, described him as "very sensible,"
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • 18 John Adams was a lawyer and a farmer, a graduate of Harvard College, the husband of Abigail Smith Adams, the father of four children.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • As James Warren wrote to John Adams, "He is certainly the best man for the place he is in, important as it is, that ever lived."
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • John Adams, a frequent patron, remembered Knox as a youth "of pleasing manners and inquisitive turn of mind."
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • Fortunately, he was able to obtain an immediate opinion from John Adams, who was on a brief leave from Congress at his home in Braintree.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • John Adams was also, as many could attest, a great-hearted, persevering man of uncommon ability and force.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • John Adams was not a man of the world.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • It was a crushing moment for Washington and for John Adams.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • From the door of the house where John Adams had said goodbye to wife and children that morning, to the church, was less than a mile.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • When he referred to himself as John Adams of Braintree, it was not in a manner of speaking.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • In 1734, in October, the golden time of year on the Massachusetts shore, Deacon John Adams, at age forty-three, married Susanna Boylston of Brookline.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • That virtue and independence were among the highest of mortal attainments, John Adams never doubted.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • "Let frugality and industry be our virtues," John Adams advised Abigail concerning the raising of their own children.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • His father was "the honestest man" John Adams ever knew.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Indeed, for the rest of his life, a morning "gill" of hard cider was to be John Adams’s preferred drink before breakfast.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • With his departure, in the words of one Harvard history, Locke was "promptly forgotten," but not by John Adams.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • The following day thirty-four-year-old John Adams was asked to defend the soldiers and their captain, when they came to trial.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • As time would show, John Adams’s part in the drama did increase his public standing, making him in the long run more respected than ever.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • WHAT NEITHER JOHN DICKINSON nor John Adams nor anyone could have anticipated was the stunning effect of Common Sense.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • What John Adams said was not recorded.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Standing beside John Adams, Jefferson looked like a lanky, freckled youth.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • John Adams’s irrepressible desire was to seize hold of it, and at times his was to be the path of Don Quixote.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • John Adams, by contrast, had neither debts nor slaves and all his life abhorred the idea of either.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • An exultant John Adams wrote to Patrick Henry that the "natural course and order of things" was coming to pass at last.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • It was John Adams, more than anyone, who had made it happen.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • No man better merited than Mr. John Adams to hold a most conspicuous place in the design.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • But at the time Jefferson wrote nothing of the occasion, nor did John Adams.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • The wait for further word seemed interminable and in such "strange uncertainty," John Adams sensed disaster.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • John Adams was not on the list.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • He had not only the responsibility of ensuring safe passage to France, but he was to consult with the Honorable John Adams on all important decisions.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • In later years much would be written and said of John Adams’s dislike of France, his puritanical disapproval of the French and their ways.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
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