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Saxons
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Saxons
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  • The Saxons were amongst the invaders of Britannia during the 5th century.
  • * The Haytiens were not Anglo Saxons; if they had been there would have been another story.
    Harriet Beecher Stowe  --  Uncle Tom’s Cabin
  • In the population of Transylvania there are four distinct nationalities: Saxons in the South, and mixed with them the Wallachs, who are the descendants of the Dacians; Magyars in the West, and Szekelys in the East and North.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • That is what we Saxons feel, at any rate.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King

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  • He stands in the middle of the lane and tells the world to step outside, he’s ready to fight, ready to fight and die for Ireland, which is more than he can say for the men of Limerick, who are known the length and breadth of the world for collaborating with the perfidious Saxons.
    Frank McCourt  --  Angela’s Ashes
  • Their mudcabins and their shielings by the roadside were laid low by the batteringram and the Times rubbed its hands and told the whitelivered Saxons there would soon be as few Irish in Ireland as redskins in America.
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • Angles, Saxons and Jutes.
    Don DeLillo  --  White Noise
  • Another group, stationed under the gallery occupied by the Saxons, had shown no less interest in the fate of the day.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • After his long wars against the Saracens, Saxons, Slays, and Northmen, the ageless emperor died; but he sleeps only, to awake in the hour of his country’s need.
    Joseph Campbell  --  The Hero With a Thousand Faces
  • He seemed precisely to have sprung from that vanished race—if, indeed, it ever existed, save in the reredos of San Zeno and the frescoes of the Eremitani, where Swann had come in contact with it, and where it still dreams—fruit of the impregnation of a classical statue by some one of the Master’s Paduan models, or of Albert Duerer’s Saxons.
    Marcel Proust  --  Swann’s Way

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  • …the town, the inhabitants of which have very little intercourse with the householders of Hanover or Grosvenor-square (for he entered through Gray’s-inn-lane), so he rambled about some time before he could even find his way to those happy mansions where fortune segregates from the vulgar those magnanimous heroes, the descendants of antient Britons, Saxons, or Danes, whose ancestors, being born in better days, by sundry kinds of merit, have entailed riches and honour on their posterity.
    Henry Fielding  --  Tom Jones
  • It was not born in England among the Saxons and the Britons.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • "Of four hundred thousand who crossed the Vistula," he wrote further of the Russian war, "half were Austrians, Prussians, Saxons, Poles, Bavarians, Wurttembergers, Mecklenburgers, Spaniards, Italians, and Neapolitans.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  War and Peace
  • ] [Footnote 57: Alfred, surnamed the Great (848-901), king of the West Saxons in England.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • Some people say they are the Oldest of All, who lived in England before the Romans came here—before us Saxons, before the Old Ones themselves—and that they have been driven underground.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • They were not outlaws because they were murderers, or for any reason like that They were Saxons who had revolted against Uther Pendragon’s conquest, and who refused to accept a foreign king.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • They were therefore in universal use among Prince John’s courtiers; and the long mantle, which formed the upper garment of the Saxons, was held in proportional derision.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • And while their manners were thus the subject of sarcastic observation, the untaught Saxons unwittingly transgressed several of the arbitrary rules established for the regulation of society.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • The Saxons were slaves to their Norman masters if you chose to look at it in one way—but, if you chose to look at it in another, they were the same farm labourers who get along on too few shillings a week today.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • He does not recollect that there was any attempt to contrast the two races in their habits and sentiments; and indeed it was obvious, that history was violated by introducing the Saxons still existing as a high-minded and martial race of nobles.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • While indulging themselves in the pleasures of the table, they aimed at delicacy, but avoided excess, and were apt to attribute gluttony and drunkenness to the vanquished Saxons, as vices peculiar to their inferior station.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • "For fear of the Saxons?" said De Bracy, laughing; "we should need no weapon but our hunting spears to bring these boars to bay."
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • Is it too much that two Saxons, myself and the noble Athelstane, should hold land in the country which was once the patrimony of our race?
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • The Saxons started from the table, and hastened to the window.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • But they were Saxons who robbed the chapel at St Bees of cup, candlestick and chalice, were they not?
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • The Saxons were just beginning to settle down when your father the Conqueror arrived with his pack of Normans, and that is where we are today.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • The Normans are a Teuton race, like the Saxons whom your father conquered.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • So were his predecessors the Saxons, who drove the Old Ones away.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • But the point is that the Saxon Conquest did succeed, and so did the Norman Conquest of the Saxons.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • The Saxons and Normans of Arthur’s accession had begun to think of themselves as Englishmen.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • These men were Saxons, and not free by any means from the national love of ease and good living which the Normans stigmatized as laziness and gluttony.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • But his petty vanity was sufficiently gratified by receiving this homage at the hands of his immediate attendants, and of the Saxons who approached him.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • The Romans went away about eight hundred years ago, and then another Teuton invasion—of people mainly called Saxons—drove the whole ragbag west as usual.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • Your father settled the unfortunate Saxons long ago, however brutally he did it, and when a great many years have passed one ought to be ready to accept a status quo.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • —May Mista, Skogula, and Zernebock, gods of the ancient Saxons—fiends, as the priests now call them—supply the place of comforters at your dying bed, which Ulrica now relinquishes!
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • He therefore gently insinuated the incapacity of the native of any other country to engage in the genial conflict of the bowl with the hardy and strong-headed Saxons; something he mentioned, but slightly, about his own holy character, and ended by pressing his proposal to depart to repose.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • Bethink thee that, though the men be Saxons, they are rich and powerful, and regarded with the more respect by their countrymen, that wealth and honour are but the lot of few of Saxon descent.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • In that case I don’t see why the Gaelic Confederation should want to fight against me—as a Norman king—when it was really the Saxons who hunted them, and when it was hundreds of years ago in any case.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • ] [Footnote 207: Alfred the Great (849-901), King of the West Saxons.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • Boar-spears, scythes, flails, and the like, were their chief arms; for the Normans, with the usual policy of conquerors, were jealous of permitting to the vanquished Saxons the possession or the use of swords and spears.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • These circumstances rendered the assistance of the Saxons far from being so formidable to the besieged, as the strength of the men themselves, their superior numbers, and the animation inspired by a just cause, might otherwise well have made them.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • The period of the narrative adopted was the reign of Richard I., not only as abounding with characters whose very names were sure to attract general attention, but as affording a striking contrast betwixt the Saxons, by whom the soil was cultivated, and the Normans, who still reigned in it as conquerors, reluctant to mix with the vanquished, or acknowledge themselves of the same stock.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • —Are the Saxons in rebellion?
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • Indeed the ideas of the Saxons on these occasions were as natural as they were rude.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • It must be against large numbers of people, like the Jews or the Normans or the Saxons, so that everybody can be angry.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • And then there are all these speeches about Gaels and Saxons and Jews, and all the shouting and hysterics.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • Or there are the Saxons.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • How else wouldst thou escape from the mean precincts of a country grange, where Saxons herd with the swine which form their wealth, to take thy seat, honoured as thou shouldst be, and shalt be, amid all in England that is distinguished by beauty, or dignified by power?
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • Perhaps Oswald (for the Saxons were very superstitious) might have adopted some such hypothesis, to account for Ivanhoe’s disappearance, had he not suddenly cast his eye upon a person attired like a squire, in whom he recognised the features of his fellow-servant Gurth.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • It bore no emblem of the deceased’s birth or quality, for armorial bearings were then a novelty among the Norman chivalry themselves and, were totally unknown to the Saxons.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
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