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Pride and Prejudice
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Sample Sentences Using
Pride and Prejudice
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  • Eyeing the bookshelf crammed with James Patterson,V. C. Andrews, and romance novels, I finally found an old paperback copy of Pride and Prejudice and retired to my bunk—on top of the covers, of course.
    Piper Kerman  --  Orange Is the New Black
  • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen Chapter 1 It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.
    Jane Austen  --  Pride and Prejudice
  • I want him to be like Darcy in Pride and Prejudice (although, having said that, I’ve seen him in other things like Fever Pitch and he’s not so sexy out of frilly shirts and tights).
    Louise Rennison  --  Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging
  • Pride and Prejudice stalked in tandem the beautiful hills.
    Maya Angelou  --  I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

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  • So I added a few more photos, a few more descriptions, and answered all the questions about my interests (hockey), favorite movie (Pride and Prejudice—Sloane had made me watch it, and I hated every minute, but I knew girls went for that stuff), and heroes (my dad, of course—it sounded sensitive).
    Alex Flinn  --  Beastly
  • My favorites were Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Twilight
  • Kathy made lunches while the three girls sat at the kitchen table, eating and reciting, in English accents, scenes from Pride and Prejudice.
    Dave Eggers  --  Zeitoun
  • She is reading a well-thumbed paperback copy of Pride and Prejudice while the other children, Gogol included, watch The Love Boat and Fantasy Island, piled together on top and around the sides of his parents’ bed.
    Jhumpa Lahiri  --  The Namesake
  • Miss Austen’s Pride and Prejudice is wounded but still intact.
    Libba Bray  --  Sweet Far Thing
  • Or maybe trotting along in Hyde Park, ridden by a girl in one of those lovely Pride and Prejudice dresses.
    Sophie Kinsella  --  Confessoins of a Shopaholic

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  • They wrote novels, however; one may even go further, I said, taking PRIDE AND PREJUDICE from the shelf, and say that they wrote good novels.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • Wherefore, laying aside all national pride and prejudice in favour of modes and forms, the plain truth is, that IT IS WHOLLY OWING TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE PEOPLE, AND NOT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE GOVERNMENT, that the crown is not as oppressive in England as in Turkey.
    Thomas Paine  --  Common Sense
  • After dinner the girls asked if they could watch Pride and Prejudice again.
    Dave Eggers  --  Zeitoun
  • I place them all neatly on the shelf, spines out, except for Pride and Prejudice, for I have need of the comfort of an old friend.
    Libba Bray  --  Sweet Far Thing
  • Without boasting or giving pain to the opposite sex, one may say that PRIDE AND PREJUDICE is a good book.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • Felicity has taken over my bed and helped herself to Pride and Prejudice.
    Libba Bray  --  Sweet Far Thing
  • At any rate, one would not have been ashamed to have been caught in the act of writing PRIDE AND PREJUDICE.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • To Jane Austen there was something discreditable in writing PRIDE AND PREJUDICE.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • For if PRIDE AND PREJUDICE matters, and MIDDLEMARCH and VILLETTE and WUTHERING HEIGHTS matter, then it matters far more than I can prove in an hour’s discourse that women generally, and not merely the lonely aristocrat shut up in her country house among her folios and her flatterers, took to writing.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • And, I wondered, would PRIDE AND PREJUDICE have been a better novel if Jane Austen had not thought it necessary to hide her manuscript from visitors? I read a page or two to see; but I could not find any signs that her circumstances had harmed her work in the slightest.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • One might say, I continued, laying the book down beside PRIDE AND PREJUDICE, that the woman who wrote those pages had more genius in her than Jane Austen; but if one reads them over and marks that jerk in them, that indignation, one sees that she will never get her genius expressed whole and entire.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • "I’ve brought Pride and Prejudice.
    Libba Bray  --  Sweet Far Thing
  • But I doubt whether that was true of Charlotte Brontė, I said, opening JANE EYRE and laying it beside PRIDE AND PREJUDICE.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
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