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Mona Lisa
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Sample Sentences Using
Mona Lisa
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  • Mona Lisa, the Pyramids, the Empire State Building.
    Gillian Flynn  --  Gone Girl
  • "Not me, I guess," Veronica says, handing me a stack of magazines, a book of word games, and an old jigsaw-puzzle box of the Mona Lisa, whose famous mien, I am beginning to think, is the expression of a young woman concealing a pure feeling of joy.
    Chang-rae Lee  --  A Gesture Life
  • It would be like putting a veil on the Mona Lisa.
    Katherine Paterson  --  Bridge to Terabithia
  • "My grandfather probably created this Mona Lisa anagram long ago," Sophie said, glancing up at Langdon.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code

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  • Close encounters with history always left Langdon numbed with reverence …. like seeing the brushstrokes on the Mona Lisa.
    Dan Brown  --  Angels & Demons
  • Billy’s smile as he came out of the shrubbery was at least as peculiar as Mona Lisa’s, for he was simultaneously on foot in Germany in 1944 and riding his Cadillac in 1967.
    Kurt Vonnegut  --  Slaughterhouse-Five
  • Francie couldn’t help noticing that Mama was smiling sidewise, the way the lady did in the picture in the school auditorium, the one they called Mona Lisa.
    Betty Smith  --  A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
  • I am dying to try a different subject, something easy like designing an entire city or copying the Mona Lisa, but he won’t budge.
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  Speak
  • The Thinker bears about the same relation to sculpture as the Mona Lisa does to painting, or "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" to poetry — a great work of art that has become hard to see for itself, buried under banal associations and dumb jokes.
    Tracy Kidder  --  Strength in What Remains
  • It was a Mona Lisa smile, the meaning of which no one could figure out.
    Richard Preston  --  The Hot Zone

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  • Her hair is pulled back off her forehead and her lips are creased in a Mona Lisa smile.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • She showed him Mona Lisa.
    W. Somerset Maugham  --  Of Human Bondage
  • She is also known as La Gioconda, or the Mona Lisa, a wife and mother of five children who sat for this portrait in the early sixteenth century.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Kennedy
  • And the way her mouth curled up on the right side all the time, like she was preparing to smirk, like she’d mastered the right half of the Mona Lisa’s inimitable smile ….
    John Green  --  Looking for Alaska
  • You’d look at a silver chalice or a marble statue or the Mona Lisa or whatever, and admire it for its beauty and historical importance and everything—and then you’d reach for the price tag and gasp, "Hey, look how much this one is!"
    Sophie Kinsella  --  Confessoins of a Shopaholic
  • IS THE PORTRAIT OF MONA LISA GOOD IF I DESIRE TO SEE IT?
    James Joyce  --  A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
  • Was she supposed to visit the Mona Lisa?
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • He easily could have visited the Mona Lisa before he died.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • She had seen pictures of the Mona Lisa in books and didn’t like it at all.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • After everything she’d heard about the Mona Lisa, she felt as if she were approaching royalty.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • She looked back at the Mona Lisa and shook her head.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • I think my grandfather may have left me a message at the Mona Lisa—some kind of clue as to who killed him.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • "As strange as it may sound," Sophie said, "I think he wants me to get to the Mona Lisa before anyone else does."
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • Sophie arrived breathless outside the large wooden doors of the Salle des Etats—the room that housed the Mona Lisa.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • Slowly, as if moving underwater, Langdon turned his head and gazed through the reddish haze toward the Mona Lisa.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • The fleur-de-lis… the flower of Lisa… the Mona Lisa.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • Two years later, the Mona Lisa was discovered hidden in the false bottom of a trunk in a Florence hotel room.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • The Mona Lisa’s status as the most famous piece of art in the world, Langdon knew, had nothing to do with her enigmatic smile.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • Quite simply, the Mona Lisa was famous because Leonardo da Vinci claimed she was his finest accomplishment.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • Even so, many art historians suspected Da Vinci’s reverence for the Mona Lisa had nothing to do with its artistic mastery.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • The Mona Lisa was, in fact, one of the world’s most documented inside jokes.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • Most recently Langdon had shared the Mona Lisa’s secret with a rather unlikely group—a dozen inmates at the Essex County Penitentiary.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • By lowering the countryside on the left, Da Vinci made Mona Lisa look much larger from the left side than from the right side.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • Because Da Vinci was a big fan of feminine principles, he made Mona Lisa look more majestic from the left than the right.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • Is it true that the Mona Lisa is a picture of Da Vinci in drag? I heard that was true.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • Whatever Da Vinci was up to," Langdon said, "his Mona Lisa is neither male nor female.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • "Mona Lisa… holy crap," somebody gasped.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • Gentlemen, not only does the face of Mona Lisa look androgynous, but her name is an anagram of the divine union of male and female.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • And that, my friends, is Da Vinci’s little secret, and the reason for Mona Lisa’s knowing smile.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • "My grandfather was here," Sophie said, dropping suddenly to her knees, now only ten feet from the Mona Lisa.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • Quickly striding the final few steps to the Mona Lisa, she illuminated the floor directly in front of the painting.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • At that moment, Langdon saw a faint purple glimmer on the protective glass before the Mona Lisa.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • On the glass, six words glowed in purple, scrawled directly across the Mona Lisa’s face.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • The text seemed to hover in space, casting a jagged shadow across Mona Lisa’s mysterious smile.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • Sophie looked baffled in the glow of the message scrawled across the Mona Lisa’s face.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • Security warden Claude Grouard simmered with rage as he stood over his prostrate captive in front of the Mona Lisa.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • She pictured the message scrawled on the protective glass of the Mona Lisa.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • The Da Vinci she had grabbed, much like the Mona Lisa, was notorious among art historians for its plethora of hidden pagan symbolism.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • The Mona Lisa!
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • When Sophie was a little girl, no trip to the Mona Lisa had been complete without her grandfather dragging her across the room to see this second painting.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
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