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Mesopotamia
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  • I never learned anything about her except that she had a brother in the FiftySecond Division and a brother in Mesopotamia and she was very good to Catherine Barkley.
    Ernest Hemingway  --  A Farewell to Arms
  • There was another good part, that of the king of Mesopotamia; but through so many interruptions, it was difficult to make out what end he served.
    Victor Hugo  --  The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • Many of the villages of Mesopotamia are built of second-hand bricks of a very good quality, obtained from the ruins of Babylon, and the cement on them is older and probably harder still.
    Henry David Thoreau  --  Walden
  • Not all the versions current in Mesopotamia and the Near East in the third millennium need have survived till today.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh

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  • …profits, not upon fixed wages, but upon their common luck, together with their common vigilance, intrepidity, and hard work; though all these things do in some cases tend to beget a less rigorous discipline than in merchantmen generally; yet, never mind how much like an old Mesopotamian family these whalemen may, in some primitive instances, live together; for all that, the punctilious externals, at least, of the quarter-deck are seldom materially relaxed, and in no instance done away.
    Herman Melville  --  Moby Dick
  • In the figures of the gods that have come down from ancient Mesopotamia (Sumer and Akkad, Babylonia and Assyria) the thunderbolt, in the same form as the vajra, is a conspicuous element (see Figure 6z); from these it was inherited by Zeus.
    Joseph Campbell  --  The Hero With a Thousand Faces
  • Noble Ventidius, Whilst yet with Parthian blood thy sword is warm The fugitive Parthians follow; spur through Media, Mesopotamia, and the shelters whither The routed fly: so thy grand captain Antony Shall set thee on triumphant chariots, and Put garlands on thy head.
    William Shakespeare  --  Antony and Cleopatra
  • Used in Mesopotamia until roughly 2000 B.C. The oldest of all written languages.
    Neal Stephenson  --  Snow Crash
  • Yes, it goes back to a legend associated with Mesopotamia.
    Jill McCorkle  --  Ferris Beach
  • Leo Oppenheim, Ancient Mesopotamia.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues

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  • He sent his best servant to Mesopotamia with many camels and gifts.
    Peter Jenkins  --  A Walk Across America
  • With its fancy palaces and temples, Babylon was one of the greatest cities of Mesopotamia.
    Bryan Brown  --  Laying Down the LAW
  • 24:10 And the servant took ten camels of the camels of his master, and departed; for all the goods of his master were in his hand: and he arose, and went to Mesopotamia, unto the city of Nahor.
    The Bible  --  Genesis
  • He emanated the aura of such advanced age that one could suppose he might have predated the great Mesopotamian cities of antiquity, the Chinese Empire, and several of the lesser mountain ranges like the Andes and the Alps (being merely a contemporary of the Himalayas).
    James A. Owen  --  Here, There be Dragons
  • ]’ He turned towards the lama, to whom he might as well have talked of Mesopotamia.
    Rudyard Kipling  --  Kim
  • According to an alternative view the Sumerians were themselves the earliest cultivators in Mesopotamia.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • The Principal Gods of the Epic The cities of Mesopotamia shared a common pantheon, but the gods were not worshipped everywhere under the same names.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • The Sumerians were the first literate inhabitants of Mesopotamia, and theirs is the language of the oldest tablets from Nippur which relate to Gilgamesh.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • In 1839 a young Englishman, Austen Henry Layard, set off with a friend on an overland journey to Ceylon; but in Mesopotamia he was delayed by a reconnaissance of Assyrian mounds.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • The Semites when they invaded Mesopotamia inherited most of the Sumerian gods, but they altered their names, their mutual relations, and many of their attributes.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • The importance of the excavations at Nippur, Nineveh, and other great centres of early civilization in Mesopotamia is that they have restored a literature of high quality and of unique character.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • The History of the Epic THE Epic of Gilgamesh, the renowned king of Uruk in Mesopotamia, comes from an age which had been wholly forgotten, until in the last century archaeologists began uncovering the buried cities of the Middle East.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • Hammurabi’s were partly based on Mesopotamian traditions that were old even then.
    Bryan Brown  --  Laying Down the LAW
  • Dressed very much, I might mention, in the style of Mesopotamian kings.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • The southern part of Mesopotamia as far as the Persian Gulf was, and is, a flat hot land of marsh and plain, very productive when drained, but, apart from the date-palm, altogether without timber and without metals.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • Consider with your soft Judeo-Christian eyes the flat absurdity of the Mesopotamian gods.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • Let me tell you about ancient Mesopotamia.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • The Mesopotamian gods, on the other hand, reside in their images, and the images are nothing more, nothing less, than dolls.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • Part of the cause: of the malaise present in the Mesopotamian psychology was this insecurity under which the people lived out their lives: the lack of a covenant.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • He tells us that he sent out his servants to search the archives of the ancient seats of learning in Babylon, Uruk, and Nippur, and to copy and translate into the contemporary Akkadian Semitic those texts which were in the older Sumerian language of Mesopotamia.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • Who but a halfwit Mesopotamian, some blundering antique Arab, would believe it!
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • Nevertheless, for students of human character there are no more valuable books on earth than the books of ancient Mesopotamia and India and Egypt.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • No doubt one can explain it geographically—the Mesopotamian peoples had better land than the Hebrews—but that misses the point.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • Suppose an ancient Mesopotamian came to us now, having read all our books but remembering his own culture.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • But in Mesopotamian culture, the smell was purged!
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • There must be fighting before the valuable commodity can be shipped away, and in battle the gods of the forest tribes would fight behind their own people: therefore it was essential to enlist against them some one of the great Mesopotamian gods, and use his stronger magic against their magic.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • There’s an old Mesopotamian story, very famous—it’s one of the Naram-Sin legends; survives not only in texts from Nineveh and Harran but in Old Babylonian too.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • In ancient Mesopotamian politics, exactly as in ancient Mesopotamian religion, there’s a sharp distinction between the practical, that is, the physical, and the spiritual.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • In ancient Mesopotamian politics, exactly as in ancient Mesopotamian religion, there’s a sharp distinction between the practical, that is, the physical, and the spiritual.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • This attitude is, at least in part, a consequence: of the insecurity of life in Mesopotamia,, and of those ’overtones of anxiety’ which Henri Frankfort described as being due to ’a haunting fear that the unaccountable and turbulent powers may at any time bring disaster to human society’.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • The greatest talc of the elixir quest in the Mesopotamian, pre-biblical tradition is that of Gilgamesh, a legendary king of the Sumerian city of Erech, who set forth to attain the watercress of immortality, the plant "Never Grow Old."
    Joseph Campbell  --  The Hero With a Thousand Faces
  • Other flood stories were known in ancient Mesopotamia but the earliest Sumerian literary reference does not seem to be much older than the Old Babylonian Atra-hasis of the early second millennium.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • Wherever the Mesopotamian influence extended, the traits of the goddess were touched by the light of this fluctuating star.
    Joseph Campbell  --  The Hero With a Thousand Faces
  • Mesopotamia was Abraham’s homeland and he wanted Isaac to have a wife from there.
    Peter Jenkins  --  A Walk Across America
  • According to one widely held view these Sumerians had arrived in Mesopotamia some time before 3000 B.C. Here, in the fertile plains, they inherited the prosperity of the settled inhabitants who, being illiterate, are known only by their beautiful pottery and by their settlements in villages of reed-huts and sun-dried brick houses.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • I grant you, it’s obvious that the system didn’t work in ancient Mesopotamia—but compare the failure of Israel, where law was wholly rational, as no one has shown more clearly than Spinoza, in his Tractatus Theologico-Politicus, or whatever it’s called.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • SUNLIGHT: So we come to the subject of the Mesopotamian dead.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • Imagine a Mesopotamian city.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • I have it from my husband, who is a cinquantenier**, at the Parloir-aux Bourgeois, and who was this morning comparing the Flemish ambassadors with those of Prester John and the Emperor of Trebizond, who came from Mesopotamia to Paris, under the last king, and who wore rings in their ears.
    Victor Hugo  --  The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • Allow me to quote from Kramer, Samuel Noah, and Maier, John R. Myths of Enki, the Crafty GocL New York, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989: ’Religion, magic, and medicine are so completely intertwined in Mesopotamia that separating them is frustrating and perhaps futile work.
    Neal Stephenson  --  Snow Crash
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