To better see sample sentences using the word
participle
please enable javascript.

Sample Sentences Using
participle -- in English
Go to Word Detail Page
Go to Home Page
  • English verbs have two participles which typically end in "ed" or "ing".
  • This inflected as follows: noun-verb, goodthink; past tense and past participle, goodthinked; present participle, good— thinking; adjective, goodthinkful; adverb, goodthinkwise; verbal noun, goodthinker.
    George Orwell  --  1984
  • The next line presents us again with a dual form, this time in a middle participle.
    Homer  --  The Odyssey
  • In the classroom we all learned past participles, but in the streets and in our homes the Blacks learned to drop s’s from plurals and suffixes from past-tense verbs.
    Maya Angelou  --  I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

  • Show more
  • The first project was, to shorten discourse, by cutting polysyllables into one, and leaving out verbs and participles, because, in reality, all things imaginable are but norms.
    Jonathan Swift  --  Gulliver’s Travels
  • Her education was finished, that is to say, she has been taught religion, and even and above all, devotion; then "history," that is to say the thing that bears that name in convents, geography, grammar, the participles, the kings of France, a little music, a little drawing, etc. ; but in all other respects she was utterly ignorant, which is a great charm and a great peril.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • "Look," he said quietly, "the past participle conjugated with avoir agrees with the direct object when it precedes."
    D.H. Lawrence  --  Sons and Lovers
  • pl. of participle used as substantive.
    Thomas Wolfe  --  Look Homeward, Angel
  • It is the verb vacilar, present participle vacilando.
    John Steinbeck  --  Travels with Charley
  • Infinitives and Participles are Verbals.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language

  • Show more again
  • I am the most slavish of students, with here a dictionary, there a notebook in which I enter curious uses of the past participle.
    Virginia Woolf  --  The Waves
  • …subject, monosyllabic onomatopoeic transitive verb with direct feminine object) from the active voice into its correlative aorist preterite proposition (parsed as feminine subject, auxiliary verb and quasimonosyllabic onomatopoeic past participle with complementary masculine agent) in the passive voice: the continued product of seminators by generation: the continual production of semen by distillation: the futility of triumph or protest or vindication: the inanity of extolled…
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • ] [Footnote 138: Withholden, old participle of withhold, now withheld.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • In moments were a dozen, from Finn Nielsen to Gospodin Dangling-Participle (turned out to be good cobber aside from his fetish).
    Robert A. Heinlein  --  The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
  • Besides the loss of the "s," other innovations are the use of be plus a verb in the present participle—for example, he be working—and the use of had plus a past-tense verb, as in Yesterday I had went, or Yesterday I had saw him; these features were not found in black speech before World War II.
    Robert MacNeil and William Crane  --  Do You Speak American?
  • He never uses /gotten/ as the perfect participle of /get/; he always uses plain /got/.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • /To hold/ and /to sit/ belong to the same class; their original perfect participles were not /held/ and /sat/, but /holden/ and /sitten/.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • But the perfect participle (which is also the disused preterite) of /to sit/ has survived, as in "I have /sat/ there."
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • It is often used as the perfect participle, as in "I have /wan/ $4."
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • Here the rule in correct English is followed faithfully, though the perfect participle [Pg209] employed is not the English participle.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • Here the rule in correct English is followed faithfully, though the perfect participle [Pg209] employed is not the English participle.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • The contrary substitution of the preterite for the perfect participle, as in "I have /went/" and "he has /did/," apparently has a double influence behind it.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • /Comed/ as the perfect participle of /to come/ and /digged/ as the preterite of /to dig/ are both in Shakespeare, and the latter is also in Milton and in the Authorized Version of the Bible.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • Moreover, this perfect participle, thus put in place of the preterite, was further reinforced by the fact that it was the adjectival form of the verb, and hence collaterally familiar.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • Whatever the true cause of the substitution of the preterite for the perfect participle, it seems to be a tendency inherent in English, and during the age of Elizabeth it showed itself even in the most formal speech.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • The misuse of the perfect participle for the preterite, now almost the invariable rule in vulgar American, is common to many other dialects of English, and seems to be a symptom of a general decay of the perfect tenses.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • [17] Thus, no less than 57 per cent of the oral errors reported by the teachers of grades III and VII involved the use of the verb, and nearly half of these, or 24 per cent, of the total, involved a confusion of the past tense form and the perfect participle.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • This inflected as follows: noun-verb, goodthink; past tense and past participle, goodthinked; present participle, good— thinking; adjective, goodthinkful; adverb, goodthinkwise; verbal noun, goodthinker.
    George Orwell  --  1984
  • Thus, in all verbs the preterite and the past participle were the same and ended in-ed. The preterite of steal was stealed, the preterite of think was thinked, and so on throughout the language, all such forms as swam, gave, brought, spoke, taken, etc., being abolished.
    George Orwell  --  1984
  • Thus, the relative frequency of confusions between the past tense forms of verbs and the perfect participles drops from 24 per cent to 5 per cent, and errors based on double negatives drop to 1 per cent. But this improvement in one direction merely serves to unearth new barbarisms in other directions, concealed in the oral tables by the flood of errors now remedied.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • Some of the more familiar conjugations of verbs in the American common speech, as recorded by Charters or Lardner or derived from my own collectanea, are here set down: /Present/ /Preterite/ /Perfect Participle/ Am was bin (or ben)[20] Attack attackted attackted (Be)[21] was bin (or ben) [20] Beat beaten beat Become[22] become became Begin begun began Bend bent bent Bet bet bet Bind bound bound Bite bitten bit Bleed bled bled Blow blowed (or blew) blowed (or blew) Break broken broke…
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • On television, as time became more valuable, commercials shorter, and the programs between the commercials faster-paced, it has been remarked that news programs are leaving out verbs, or using mostly present participles, in a new, abbreviated language; for example, John King on CNN: "Those negotiations continuing.
    Robert MacNeil and William Crane  --  Do You Speak American?
  • Emerson here uses this past participle with its original meaning instead of in its present sense of "indebted.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • Lounsbury says that /boughten/ probably originated in the Northern [/i. e./, Lowland Scotch] dialect of English, "which …. inclined to retain the full form of the past participle," and even to add its termination "to words to which it did not properly belong.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • Search for samples from other sources
Interest -- Source
General -- Google News®
General -- Time® Magazine
General -- Twitter®

Go to Home Page
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading