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octave
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Sample Sentences Using
octave -- as in: has a four-octave range
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  • Her piano teacher said her hand can’t span an octave with reasonable comfort.
  • Rogak’s voice pitched up an octave.
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  The Impossible Knife of Memory
  • Bridget’s voice shoots up another octave, and as I walk away I hear Alex start trying to calm her down, no doubt feeding her lies as quickly as he can come up with them.
    Lauren Oliver  --  Before I Fall
  • His voice goes up an octave.
    Rick Yancey  --  The 5th Wave

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  • Then she brightened again, rising an octave.
    Dave Eggers  --  The Circle
  • My voice was now an octave higher than Meg’s.
    Rick Riordan  --  The Trials of Apollo
  • Dell found his voice rising two octaves.
    Holly Goldberg Sloan  --  Counting by 7s
  • His mouth is closing in on mine, and the way his voice has dropped into some sort of lyrical, godlike octave makes my heart pummel within my chest.
    Colleen Hoover  --  Hopeless
  • I think my voice goes up an octave because I can’t believe this, and I feel a decade’s worth of resolve shatter.
    Katja Millay  --  The Sea of Tranquility
  • This seemed to increase their laughter by several octaves.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Water is Wide

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  • He has long, lean piano fingers like what Amanda wishes she had so she could stretch her hand across one full octave.
    An Na  --  A Step from Heaven
  • My voice had risen its usual uncontrolled octaves, becoming an epicene mezzo-soprano.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice
  • I asked, my voice inching up an octave.
    Becca Fitzpatrick  --  Hush, Hush
  • Hilly raises her voice about three octaves higher when she talks to colored people.
    Kathryn Stockett  --  The Help
  • When I speak, my voice seems to have dropped an octave.
    Suzanne Collins  --  The Hunger Games
  • Dede Antanas is asleep, and so are the Szedvilases, husband and wife, the former snoring in octaves.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • "Those chords give the fifth and the octave," said Mr. Fogg.
    Jules Verne  --  Around the World in 80 Days
  • His voice climbed an octave.
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Bones
  • The note boomed again: and then at his firmer pressure, the note, fluking up an octave, became a strident blare more penetrating than before.
    William Golding  --  Lord of the Flies
  • My feet shuffled and my voice lowered a few octaves.
    Wes Moore  --  The Other Wes Moore
  • Winky lowered her voice by a half-octave and whispered, "He is wanting paying for his work, sir."
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
  • In fact, when I yelled "OW!" my voice was an octave higher than usual.
    Rick Riordan  --  The Last Olympian
  • Then rising an octave like "The Star-Spangled Banner": "God stirred up the holy spirit of a man named Daniel!"Oh, hooray, Daniel to the rescue.
    Barbara Kingsolver  --  The Poisonwood Bible
  • Simon’s voice went up an octave.
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Fallen Angels
  • Damien squeaked, his voice going up about twenty octaves.
    P.C. Cast & Kristin Cast  --  Marked
  • The piece ended with a trill of octaves in the treble and a final deep octave in the bass.
    James Joyce  --  Dubliners
  • "You’re a genius, you know that?" Walter’s voice rises by about an octave.
    Sara Gruen  --  Water for Elephants
  • "Ah," Seth said, his voice cracking up an octave.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Breaking Dawn
  • The humming of the screws overhead dropped an octave and a half, back through wasp and hornet to bumble bee, to cockchafer, to stag-beetle.
    Aldous Huxley  --  Brave New World
  • "That I’m dating—that we’re—it’s not true," Alec said, his voice rising and dropping several octaves as he fought to control it.
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Ashes
  • My mother’s voice crept up to that scary, shaky octave that always made my own heart instantly start beating faster.
    Sarah Dessen  --  Just Listen
  • He drove without speaking through a thunder-shower that crinkled the windshield and raised the hum of his tires an octave.
    John Howard Griffin  --  Black Like Me
  • She was singing along to the song, her voice an octave higher than the melody, weaving through it with a complicated harmony.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Eclipse
  • He delighted in her stretching out her hands to new octaves now that she found herself beautiful and rich.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  Tender is the Night
  • ’Someone’s dead,’ said Malfoy and his voice seemed to go up an octave as he said it.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
  • Bloom wound a skein round four forkfingers, stretched it, relaxed, and wound it round his troubled double, fourfold, in octave, gyved them fast.
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • He encourages everyone to work hard, have fun, follow the rules, and, dropping an octave, "not end up in my office for the wrong reasons."
    Ron Suskind  --  A Hope in the Unseen
  • A Petrarchan sonnet uses a rhyme scheme that ties the first eight lines (the octave) together, followed by a rhyme scheme that unifies the last six (the sestet).
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • His voice was deep, yet strangely soft and lilting; like the bush boy’s, only several octaves lower.
    James Vance Marshall  --  Walkabout
  • The children’s screams seemed to rise an octave.
    Robert Cormier  --  After the First Death
  • The voice from the radio—it had dropped an octave, altered pitch, slowed and lengthened measurably—was now that of someone’s wayward uncle confiding the secrets of his golf game; now it miraculously glided through a tongue twister; now it suddenly sensed great depths of meaning in an ordinary double play.
    David Guterson  --  Snow Falling on Cedars
  • There were continual outbursts, melodies, unexpected cadences, then simple phrases strewn with aerial and hissing notes; then floods of scales which would have put a nightingale to rout, but in which harmony was always present; then soft modulations of octaves which rose and fell, like the bosom of the young singer.
    Victor Hugo  --  The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • My voice edged up a few octaves.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Twilight
  • That was something at least, and Mace was a big man, strong across the shoulders, and with hands that could have spanned one and a half octaves of the pub piano he said he played.
    Ian McEwan  --  Atonement
  • It was the book she was accustomed to lay open before her on special occasions,—on wet Sunday mornings, or when she heard of a death in the family, or when, as in this case, her quarrel with Mr. Glegg had been set an octave higher than usual.
    George Eliot  --  The Mill on the Floss
  • Heloved drinking rice wine and once he’d had one small glass his voice would rise an octave and he would begin to sing tunes from some of the old Beijing Operas.
    Li Cunxin  --  Mao’s Last Dancer
  • He put his cigar in his mouth, and, with his right hand, up in the treble keys, he began to play, in octaves, the melody of a song called "The Kinkajou," which, somewhat notably, had shifted into and ostensibly out of popularity before he was born.
    J.D. Salinger  --  Franny and Zooey
  • In debate they interrupted their opponents in a tone of voice that was an octave higher, and if their opponents raised their voices to be heard, the Communists raised theirs still higher until shouts rang out over the park.
    Richard Wright  --  Black Boy
  • …strange, Underne, - A.M., Ungoodly, rudely, Unhappy, unlucky, Unhilled, uncovered, Unr the, scarcely, Unsicker, unstable, Unwimpled, uncovered, Unwrast, untwisted, unbound, Upright, flat on the back, Up-so-down, upside down, Ure, usage, Utas, octave of a festival, Utterance, uttermost, Varlet, servant, Venery, hunting, Ven ails, breathing holes, Villain, man of low birth, Visors, the perforated parts of helmets, Voided, slipped away from, Wagging, shaking, Waited, watched, Waits,…
    Thomas Malory  --  Le Morte D’Arthur, Volume I
  • …strange, Underne, - A.M., Ungoodly, rudely, Unhappy, unlucky, Unhilled, uncovered, Unr the, scarcely, Unsicker, unstable, Unwimpled, uncovered, Unwrast, untwisted, unbound, Upright, flat on the back, Up-so-down, upside down, Ure, usage, Utas, octave of a festival, Utterance, uttermost, Varlet, servant, Venery, hunting, Ven ails, breathing holes, Villain, man of low birth, Visors, the perforated parts of helmets, Voided, slipped away from, Wagging, shaking, Waited, watched, Waits,…
    Thomas Malory  --  Le Morte D’Arthur
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