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Sample Sentences Using
levy -- as in: levy a tax
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  • levy a fine
  • Taxes should be levied based on ability to pay.
  • Their makeup would have put an Egyptian draftsman to shame, and their clothes—particularly their shoes—had definitely been purchased in Montgomery or Mobile: Jean Louise spotted A. Nachman, Gayfer’s, Levy’s, Hammel’s, on all sides of the livingroom.
    Harper Lee  --  Go Set a Watchman
  • For all her preening about her Sorbonne education, Levy was totally useless at our electrical studies.
    Piper Kerman  --  Orange Is the New Black

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  • They talked about merchants, having deserters, and levies, and not enough salt to last the winter.
    Patrick Rothfuss  --  The Name of the Wind
  • Underwear was what Miri and Suzanne bought at Levy Brothers, one of two department stores on Broad Street.
    Judy Blume  --  In the Unlikely Event
  • The community pressure levied against him would have sent me to an asylum.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Water is Wide
  • For even then she knew that somehow she was not finished—a truth now borne out, she was relieved to say (while sprawled on the lakeside grass), by the timid yet voluptuous gurgles of hunger that attended the exalted instant, just before biting down, when her nostrils breathed in the briny smell of pickles, and mustard, and the caraway-tinged scent of Levy’s Jewish rye.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice
  • There was a, levy put on the manors near Fort William—food for the garrison, horses for transport, and suchlike.
    Diana Gabaldon  --  Outlander
  • The Bourbons left him quietly enough at the Catalans, but Napoleon returned, a special levy was made, and Fernand was compelled to join.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo

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  • I teach singing to the youths of the Connecticut levy.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Last of the Mohicans
  • In each there was an enemy to contend with, and contributions to be levied.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Three Musketeers
  • It divided the country into districts, and fixed the price of meat in all of them; and it owned all the refrigerator cars, and levied an enormous tribute upon all poultry and eggs and fruit and vegetables.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • ’Then he must be a noble beast indeed,’ said Aragorn; ’and it grieves me more than many tidings that might seem worse to learn that Sauron levies such tribute.
    J.R.R. Tolkien  --  The Fellowship of the Ring
  • The commissary was laying such heavy levies on foodstuffs that the tables of Atlanta were beginning to suffer.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • The Father-General needed new levies of young German-Jesuits.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • Duncan is in his grave; After life’s fitful fever he sleeps well; Treason has done his worst: nor steel, nor poison, Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing, Can touch him further.
    William Shakespeare  --  Macbeth
  • The pension from each family for the education and entertainment of a child, upon failure of due payment, is levied by the emperor’s officers.
    Jonathan Swift  --  Gulliver’s Travels
  • At all events, his hoard had been reduced by various local levies to the sum of one hundred and nine francs fifteen sous, which had been counted out to him on his departure.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • Trust to thy single virtue; for thy soldiers, All levied in my name, have in my name Took their discharge.
    William Shakespeare  --  King Lear
  • But the supporting levies the Emperor demands from —
    Frank Herbert  --  Dune
  • The shopman told me they were so many levies.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • Another bill, to levy penalizing fines against any church holding nonsegregated services, was, he contended, in flagrant contradiction to the First Amendment of the Constitution.
    John Howard Griffin  --  Black Like Me
  • I made his acquaintance in Tver when I was there on official business, and he came there for the levy of recruits.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  Anna Karenina
  • The decisions were made by the army captain, who each morning collected an extraordinary levy for the defense of public order.
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez  --  One Hundred Years of Solitude
  • He also noted the position of a pile of horse blankets, midway of the route, with the intent to levy upon them for the service of the crown of England for one night.
    Mark Twain  --  The Prince and The Pauper
  • He importunes, persecutes one, and levies a regular tax on all travellers.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • If we had reason to fear these levies even before Richard’s return, trowest thou there is any doubt now which party their leaders will take?
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • On the whole, I proposed as a more effectual watch, the hiring of proper men to serve constantly in that business; and as a more equitable way of supporting the charge the levying a tax that should be proportion’d to the property.
    Benjamin Franklin  --  The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
  • We pounded along, stopped, landed soldiers; went on, landed custom-house clerks to levy toll in what looked like a God-forsaken wilderness, with a tin shed and a flag-pole lost in it; landed more soldiers—to take care of the custom-house clerks, presumably.
    Joseph Conrad  --  Heart of Darkness
  • But in truth, if I discern clearly, a little ere He came, who levied the great spoil on Dis from the supernal circle, in all its parts the deep foul valley trembled so that I thought the universe had felt the love by which, as some believe, oft times the world has been converted into chaos:[1] and, at that moment, this ancient cliff here and elsewhere made this downfall.
    Dante Alighieri  --  Dante’s Inferno
  • On the outer circle there were sixty thousand kerns and gallow-glasses marching with the Eleven, and these ill-armed levies of the Old Ones were inflamed against the twenty thousand foot-soldiers of Arthur’s Sassenach army by the tragedy of the Gael.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • Brutus and Cassius Are levying powers: we must straight make head; Therefore let our alliance be combined, Our best friends made, our means stretch’d; And let us presently go sit in council, How covert matters may be best disclosed, And open perils surest answered.
    William Shakespeare  --  Julius Caesar
  • My lords, ever my company, sharing the wine of Council, the songs of the blind harper, hear me further: garments are folded for our guest and friend in the smooth chest, and gold in various shaping of adornment lies with other gifts, and many, brought by our peers; let each man add his tripod and deep-bellied cauldron: we’ll make levy upon the realm to pay us for the loss each bears in this.
    Homer  --  The Odyssey
  • He wondered how much each one contributed to the party, for there was somewhat of a spiritual tax levied.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  This Side of Paradise
  • He went out to levy on the village—not with a begging-bowl, which might do for down-country, but in the manner of a prince.
    Rudyard Kipling  --  Kim
  • Upon our first, he sent out to suppress His nephew’s levies; which to him appear’d To be a preparation ’gainst the Polack; But, better look’d into, he truly found It was against your highness; whereat griev’d,— That so his sickness, age, and impotence Was falsely borne in hand,—sends out arrests On Fortinbras; which he, in brief, obeys; Receives rebuke from Norway; and, in fine, Makes vow before his uncle never more To give th’ assay of arms against your majesty.
    William Shakespeare  --  Hamlet, Prince of Denmark
  • For to prevent the effusion of blood, and for the avoiding all other inconveniences likely to grow from the wars now levied in our realm of Narnia, it is our pleasure to adventure our royal person on behalf of our trusty and well-beloved Caspian in clean wager of battle to prove upon your Lordship’s body that the said Caspian is lawful King under us in Narnia both by our gift and by the laws of the Telmarines, and your Lordship twice guilty of treachery both in withholding the dominion…
    C.S. Lewis  --  Prince Caspian: The Return to Narnia
  • For Hot, Cold, Moist, and Dry, four champions fierce, Strive here for mastery, and to battle bring Their embryon atoms: they around the flag Of each his faction, in their several clans, Light-armed or heavy, sharp, smooth, swift, or slow, Swarm populous, unnumbered as the sands Of Barca or Cyrene’s torrid soil, Levied to side with warring winds, and poise Their lighter wings.
    John Milton  --  Paradise Lost
  • …growler, since I entered upon the government of the island they gave me, and all that time I never had a bellyful of victuals, no not for an hour; doctors persecuted me and enemies crushed my bones; nor had I any opportunity of taking bribes or levying taxes; and if that be the case, as it is, I don’t deserve, I think, to come out in this fashion; but ’man proposes and God disposes;’ and God knows what is best, and what suits each one best; and ’as the occasion, so the behaviour;’ and…
    Miguel de Cervantes  --  Don Quixote
  • As a government-appointed chief, he was eligible for a stipend as well as a portion of the fees the government levied on the community for vaccination of livestock and communal grazing land.
    Nelson Mandela  --  Long Walk to Freedom
  • …King of Naples, being an enemy To me inveterate, hearkens my brother’s suit; Which was, that he, in lieu o’ the premises Of homage and I know not how much tribute, Should presently extirpate me and mine Out of the dukedom, and confer fair Milan, With all the honours on my brother: whereon, A treacherous army levied, one midnight Fated to the purpose, did Antonio open The gates of Milan; and, i’ th’ dead of darkness, The ministers for th’ purpose hurried thence Me and thy crying self.
    William Shakespeare  --  The Tempest
  • …and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do.
    Thomas Jefferson et al.  --  The Declaration of Independence
  • They were "in love" no longer; no, he had taken up with another woman, a serious woman, with her hair in a plait and a case in her hand (Minta had described her gratefully, almost admiringly), who went to meetings and shared Paul’s views (they had got more and more pronounced) about the taxation of land values and a capital levy.
    Virginia Woolf  --  To the Lighthouse
  • The subjects’ grief Comes through commissions, which compels from each The sixth part of his substance, to be levied Without delay; and the pretence for this Is nam’d, your wars in France.
    William Shakespeare  --  Henry VIII
  • That whole week Baby Kochamma eavesdropped relentlessly on the twins’ private conversations, and whenever she caught them speaking in Malayalam, she levied a small fine which was deducted at source.
    Arundhati Roy  --  The God of Small Things
  • …of that sort which he described in his lengthy dissertation as the richest country bar none on the face of God’s earth, far and away superior to England, with coal in large quantities, six million pounds worth of pork exported every year, ten millions between butter and eggs and all the riches drained out of it by England levying taxes on the poor people that paid through the nose always and gobbling up the best meat in the market and a lot more surplus steam in the same vein.
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • …doves themselves, and when the swarms from my lord’s dovecote settled on their crops they must not lose their temper and kill a bird, for awful would the penalty be; when the harvest was at last gathered, then came the procession of robbers to levy their blackmail upon it: first the Church carted off its fat tenth, then the king’s commissioner took his twentieth, then my lord’s people made a mighty inroad upon the remainder; after which, the skinned freeman had liberty to bestow the…
    Mark Twain  --  A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court
  • For, since the mortal and intestine jars ’Twixt thy seditious countrymen and us, It hath in solemn synods been decreed, Both by the Syracusians and ourselves, To admit no traffic to our adverse towns; Nay, more, If any born at Ephesus be seen At any Syracusian marts and fairs;— Again, if any Syracusian born Come to the bay of Ephesus, he dies, His goods confiscate to the Duke’s dispose; Unless a thousand marks be levied, To quit the penalty and to ransom him.
    William Shakespeare  --  The Comedy of Errors
  • A third offers some old musty laws that have been antiquated by a long disuse (and which, as they had been forgotten by all the subjects, so they had also been broken by them), and proposes the levying the penalties of these laws, that, as it would bring in a vast treasure, so there might be a very good pretence for it, since it would look like the executing a law and the doing of justice.
    Thomas More  --  Utopia
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