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Sample Sentences Using
defraud
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  • She defrauded the customers who trusted her
  • She was charged with conspiring to defraud her employer.
  • You know the commandments: ’Do not murder, do not commit adultery, do not steal, do not give false testimony, do not defraud, honor your father and mother.’
    Mark 10:19 (NIV)
  • She had sacrificed everything; she had never married; she had struggled, plotted, schemed, defrauded through the years—and achieved the triumph of Renee’s marriage to Homer Slottern.
    Ayn Rand  --  The Fountainhead

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  • They’re saying that I am an unscrupulous cheat who has defrauded them.
    Ayn Rand  --  Atlas Shrugged
  • "Not going to be any war!" cried the twins indignantly, as though they had been defrauded.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • [4] Therefore I warn thee, that if thou ever hearest otherwise the origin of my town, no falsehood may defraud the truth.
    Dante Alighieri  --  Dante’s Inferno
  • Of happiness the chiefest part Is a wise heart: And to defraud the gods in aught With peril’s fraught.
    Sophocles  --  Antigone
  • It is the story of the persecuted, the defrauded, the feared and detested.
    John Howard Griffin  --  Black Like Me
  • Now, as he took my prize out of my hands, tricked and defrauded me, he need not tempt me; I know him, and he cannot change my mind.
    Homer  --  The Iliad

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  • The minister might stand there, if it so pleased him, until morning should redden in the east, without other risk than that the dank and chill night air would creep into his frame, and stiffen his joints with rheumatism, and clog his throat with catarrh and cough; thereby defrauding the expectant audience of to-morrow’s prayer and sermon.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
  • Bereft of his cake, defrauded of his frolic, and borne away by a strong hand to that detested bed, poor Demi could not restrain his wrath, but openly defied Papa, and kicked and screamed lustily all the way upstairs.
    Louisa May Alcott  --  Little Women
  • Full black; coal dealer; about thirty years old; worth eighteen thousand dollars; paid for himself twice, being once defrauded to the amount of sixteen hundred dollars; made all his money by his own efforts—much of it while a slave, hiring his time of his master, and doing business for himself; a fine, gentlemanly fellow.
    Harriet Beecher Stowe  --  Uncle Tom’s Cabin
  • This girl," he continued, looking at me, "knew no more than you, Wood, of the disgusting secret: she thought all was fair and legal and never dreamt she was going to be entrapped into a feigned union with a defrauded wretch, already bound to a bad, mad, and embruted partner!
    Charlotte Bronte  --  Jane Eyre
  • Laborious years had passed since then; and now my brother and I were slaves to the man who had defrauded her of her money, and tried to defraud her of her freedom.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • I’d just have to prove that they were using the telegraph company to defraud.
    William Faulkner  --  The Sound and the Fury
  • Indeed?’ said Mr. Gradgrind, rather resentfully, as having been defrauded of his good opinion.
    Charles Dickens  --  Hard Times
  • Indeed, I could not help being grieved, when I considered that I who had never wronged or defrauded any person in my life, was now pursued like a common thief, and if taken to run the greatest danger of being executed as such; and, though innocent, I found myself under the necessity of flying for my safety; and thereby escape being brought to shame, of which I was even more afraid than death itself.
    Daniel Defoe  --  Robinson Crusoe
  • I felt sad and embarrassed and, somehow, defrauded.
    Robert Penn Warren  --  All the King’s Men
  • Eight days hence I will give you your full shares in money, without defrauding you of a farthing, as you will see in the end.
    Miguel de Cervantes  --  Don Quixote
  • The student who secures his coveted leisure and retirement by systematically shirking any labor necessary to man obtains but an ignoble and unprofitable leisure, defrauding himself of the experience which alone can make leisure fruitful.
    Henry David Thoreau  --  Walden
  • He felt, in leaving her, he was defrauding her of life.
    D.H. Lawrence  --  Sons and Lovers
  • He had half a mind to stay and see the cart packed with the remaining wines and provisions, knowing that they would deceive and defraud Mitya.
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  The Brothers Karamazov
  • But when the Impositions, are layd upon those things which men consume, every man payeth Equally for what he useth: Nor is the Common-wealth defrauded, by the luxurious waste of private men.
    Thomas Hobbes  --  Leviathan
  • But when he was released he felt defrauded by the brevity of his captivity, and even in the days of his old age, when so many other wars were confused in his memory, he still thought he was the only man in the city, and perhaps the country, who had dragged fivepound leg irons for the sake of love.
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez  --  Love in the Time of Cholera
  • The state racing board, tired of the whole mess, realized that the race’s nonbetting status gave them an out because the public had not been defrauded.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Seabiscuit
  • Mrs. Norris felt herself defrauded of an office on which she had always depended, whether his arrival or his death were to be the thing unfolded; and was now trying to be in a bustle without having anything to bustle about, and labouring to be important where nothing was wanted but tranquillity and silence.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • To steal from one another is indeed highly criminal and indecent; for this may be strictly stiled defrauding the poor (sometimes perhaps those who are poorer than ourselves), or, to set it under the most opprobrious colours, robbing the spittal.
    Henry Fielding  --  Tom Jones
  • …armed with horns, and so the element that was necessary to give the sensation of tragedy was not there, and the public, who wanted three times as much from Belmonte, who was sick with a fistula, as Belmonte had ever been able to give, felt defrauded and cheated, and Belmonte’s jaw came further out in contempt, and his face turned yellower, and he moved with greater difficulty as his pain increased, and finally the crowd were actively against him, and he was utterly contemptuous and…
    Ernest Hemingway  --  The Sun Also Rises
  • ’My children, my defrauded, swindled infants!’ cried Mr Kenwigs, pulling so hard, in his vehemence, at the flaxen tail of his second daughter, that he lifted her up on tiptoe, and kept her, for some seconds, in that attitude.
    Charles Dickens  --  Nicholas Nickleby
  • I fear I small be defrauded of my just martyrdom in the same way.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Man And Superman
  • And have you a right to defraud the Church of what is left to it in your trust?
    Willa Cather  --  Death Comes for the Archbishop
  • Never defraud yourself of sleep, nor your walk.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • After all, every one of us regularly passes up opportunities to maim, steal, and defraud.
    Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner  --  Freakonomics
  • It is better spent on a young man’s whim Than that you be accused of defrauding him.
    Jean-Baptiste Poquelin Moliere  --  Tartuffe
  • But defrauding poor people?
    Meg Cabot  --  Queen of Babble
  • Then she knew a moment of anger and wanted to shout at them because she felt they had cheated her out of her dream, defrauded her.
    Ann Petry  --  Harriet Tubman
  • I ask any honest opponent of the new Constitution: Does language give us severe enough denouncements for this shameless attempt to defraud the citizens of America?
    Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, & John Jay  --  The Federalist Papers — Modern English Edition 2
  • If glory cannot move a mind so mean, Nor future praise from fading pleasure wean, Yet why should he defraud his son of fame, And grudge the Romans their immortal name!
    Virgil  --  The Aeneid
  • Ned was unaware of the existence of these debts and believed the creditors were trying to defraud him—until they presented documents signed by the previous owner, H. H. Holmes.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • We feel defrauded of the retribution due to evil acts, because the criminal adheres to his vice and contumacy, and does not come to a crisis or judgment anywhere in visible nature.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • But if I now shut my eyes, if I fail to realize the meeting-place of past and present, that I sit in a third-class railway carriage full of boys going home for the holidays, human history is defrauded of a moment’s vision.
    Virginia Woolf  --  The Waves
  • Defrauding widows and orphans.
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • "Because of a cloud that has gathered over us; though ’we have wronged no man, corrupted no man, defrauded no man!’
    Thomas Hardy  --  Jude the Obscure
  • And he’s defrauding the government.
    Meg Cabot  --  Queen of Babble
  • Laborious years had passed since then; and now my brother and I were slaves to the man who had defrauded her of her money, and tried to defraud her of her freedom.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • She had lived forty years under the same roof with my grandmother; she knew how faithfully she had served her owners, and how cruelly she had been defrauded of her rights; and she resolved to protect her.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • As often as the night obscures the skies With humid shades, or twinkling stars arise, Anchises’ angry ghost in dreams appears, Chides my delay, and fills my soul with fears; And young Ascanius justly may complain Of his defrauded and destin’d reign.
    Virgil  --  The Aeneid
  • They’re profiteers of the black market who grow rich by defrauding the poor of their rightful share, at a time of desperate shortage.
    Ayn Rand  --  Atlas Shrugged
  • Depeculation Also Robbery, and Depeculation of the Publique treasure, or Revenues, is a greater Crime, than the robbing, or defrauding of a Private man; because to robbe the publique, is to robbe many at once.
    Thomas Hobbes  --  Leviathan
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