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  • "Xenophobia," as The Economist put it, "seems to be creeping into American politics."
    James K. Glassman  --  Threats to Security, Threats to Economy  --,pubID.23969/pub_detail.asp(retrieved 06/29/06)
  • I am protesting the tone of this lesson as racist, intolerant, and xenophobic.
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  Speak
  • But there was one reason that even the most xenophobic community center supporters grudgingly accepted the idea of a refugee soccer program on the new field out back: it was great PR to the world outside of Clarkston.
    Warren St. John  --  Outcasts United
  • The Japanese war-time diet had not sustained him, and he felt the strain of being a foreigner in an increasingly xenophobic Japan; even a German, since the defeat of the Fatherland, was unpopular.
    John Hersey  --  Hiroshima

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  • The adults of the community, representing conformity, hostility to anything new, xenophobia, suspicion, a lack of imagination, are bearing down on our young heroes.
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • Observers have described Charlestonians as vainglorious, obstinate, mercurial, verbose, xenophobic, and congenitally gracious.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Lords of Discipline
  • was archaically and delightfully Prussian, militaristic to a fault, arrogant in their economic pretensions, xenophobic to the point of happily enlisting to wipe out the "Ouster Menace."
    Dan Simmons  --  Hyperion
  • They lived in a time of extreme nationalism and xenophobia, which made it easier for them to reject foreign ideas like Asherah worship.
    Neal Stephenson  --  Snow Crash
  • In my weaker moments, I imagine the client as a vastly wealthy voyeur, a decrepit, shut-away xenophobe who keeps a national vigilance on eminent agitators and ethnics.
    Chang-rae Lee  --  Native Speaker
  • The anxiety was fed by xenophobia and anti-Semitism and culminated in the laws sharply reducing immigration after World War I. Harvard University became alarmed at the rising number of Jewish admissions (6 percent in 1908, but 22 percent by 1922) and moved to limit it.
    Robert MacNeil and William Crane  --  Do You Speak American?

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  • Garry W. McGiboney, a longtime Clarkston resident who now worked at the DeKalb County board of education, believed it was the loss of this sense of familiarity—more than xenophobia or racism—that explained opposition to the refugees in Clarkston.
    Warren St. John  --  Outcasts United
  • Bork says the activist judges see their mission, not as upholding our Constitution, but as redefining it to coerce new behaviors on what they consider "a barbarian majority motivated by bigotry, racism, sexism, xenophobia, irrational sexual morality, and the like."
    Phyllis Schlafly  -- - President Bush finally speaks out against activist judges  -- 06/29/06)
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