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  • To men like that, time was a surfeit, a barrel they watched slowly drain.
    Anthony Doerr  --  All the Light We Cannot See
  • As with his nose for wine, Nathan had an informed palate (a reaction, he said, to a childhood surfeit of soggy kreplach and gefilte fish) and he took obvious joy in making her acquainted with New York’s incredible and manifold banquet.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice
  • Just looking at them reminds me of Christmas and the sticky feeling after eating too many, the surfeit and glut.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Cat’s Eye
  • Nor was McCandless endowed with a surfeit of common sense.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild

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  • But they, surfeited, curled up to sleep.
    Johann Wyss  --  The Swiss Family Robinson
  • His bark is stoutly timber’d, and his pilot Of very expert and approv’d allowance; Therefore my hopes, not surfeited to death, Stand in bold cure.
    William Shakespeare  --  Othello, the Moor of Venice
  • You would be, sweet madam, if your miseries were in the same abundance as your good fortunes are; and yet, for aught I see, they are as sick that surfeit with too much as they that starve with nothing.
    William Shakespeare  --  The Merchant of Venice
  • While I sit at home sometimes hot tears come, and I revel in them, or stop before the surfeit makes me shiver.
    Homer  --  The Odyssey
  • For, as a surfeit of the sweetest things The deepest loathing to the stomach brings; Or, as the heresies that men do leave Are hated most of those they did deceive; So thou, my surfeit and my heresy, Of all be hated, but the most of me!
    William Shakespeare  --  A Midsummer Night’s Dream
  • The anger will not hold; the puppy is too easily surfeited.
    Toni Morrison  --  The Bluest Eye

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  • He is about it: The doors are open; and the surfeited grooms Do mock their charge with snores: I have drugg’d their possets That death and nature do contend about them, Whether they live or die.
    William Shakespeare  --  Macbeth
  • He’s full-fleshed and with a surfeit of water.
    Frank Herbert  --  Dune
  • Are not you surfeited?
    Victor Hugo  --  The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • But whereas a girl of nineteen draws her confidence from a surfeit of attention, a woman of twenty-nine is nourished on subtler stuff.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  Tender is the Night
  • I will not go into other particulars, as for example want of shirts, and no superabundance of shoes, thin and threadbare garments, and gorging themselves to surfeit in their voracity when good luck has treated them to a banquet of some sort.
    Miguel de Cervantes  --  Don Quixote
  • (A year later Ball would die of a similar ailment on the slopes of Dhaulagiri.) Fischer, forty, was a strapping, gregarious man with a blond pony tail and a surfeit of manic energy.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into Thin Air
  • If music be the food of love, play on, Give me excess of it; that, surfeiting, The appetite may sicken and so die.
    William Shakespeare  --  Twelfth Night
  • In the advertising business, this surfeit of information is called the "clutter" problem, and clutter has made it harder and harder to get any one message to stick.
    Malcolm Gladwell  --  The Tipping Point
  • You are three men of sin, whom Destiny, That hath to instrument this lower world And what is in’t,—the never-surfeited sea Hath caused to belch up you; and on this island Where man doth not inhabit; you ’mongst men Being most unfit to live.
    William Shakespeare  --  The Tempest
  • She would then have given anything for a single one of those meetings that surfeited her.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • He was a large and corpulent individual, surfeited with good clothes and good eating, who judged women as another would horseflesh.
    Theodore Dreiser  --  Sister Carrie
  • They aroused in him not hunger demanding renewal but surfeit that would demand more surfeit …. kisses that were like charity, creating want by holding back nothing at all.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  Winter Dreams
  • How strange that you should favor the offenders— favor the Trojans in their insolence ever insatiable for war! All things have surfeit—even sleep, and love, and song, and noble dancing—things a man may wish to take his fill of, and far more than war.
    Homer  --  The Iliad
  • O, I have fed upon this woe already, And now excess of it will make me surfeit.
    William Shakespeare  --  The Two Gentlemen of Verona
  • Like most fighter pilots, he had a surfeit of that.
    Tom Clancy  --  The Hunt for Red October
  • But knowledge is as food, and needs no less Her temperance over appetite, to know In measure what the mind may well contain; Oppresses else with surfeit, and soon turns Wisdom to folly, as nourishment to wind.
    John Milton  --  Paradise Lost
  • From too much liberty, my Lucio, liberty: As surfeit is the father of much fast, So every scope by the immoderate use Turns to restraint.
    William Shakespeare  --  Measure for Measure
  • Prince John, indeed, and those who courted his pleasure by imitating his foibles, were apt to indulge to excess in the pleasures of the trencher and the goblet; and indeed it is well known that his death was occasioned by a surfeit upon peaches and new ale.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • I am sure it is surfeited with babies and is now coming after adults.
    Maxine Hong Kingston  --  The Woman Warrior
  • …since last night — of the general state of mind in which I had indulged for nearly a fortnight past; Reason having come forward and told, in her own quiet way a plain, unvarnished tale, showing how I had rejected the real, and rabidly devoured the ideal; — I pronounced judgment to this effect:— That a greater fool than Jane Eyre had never breathed the breath of life; that a more fantastic idiot had never surfeited herself on sweet lies, and swallowed poison as if it were nectar.
    Charlotte Bronte  --  Jane Eyre
  • The Ponds Sometimes, having had a surfeit of human society and gossip, and worn out all my village friends, I rambled still farther westward than I habitually dwell, into yet more unfrequented parts of the town, "to fresh woods and pastures new," or, while the sun was setting, made my supper of huckleberries and blueberries on Fair Haven Hill, and laid up a store for several days.
    Henry David Thoreau  --  Walden
  • A smooth barkless tree, blackened by a surfeit of green water.
    Arundhati Roy  --  The God of Small Things
  • The letter itself was virtually endless in length, overwritten, teaching, repetitious, opinionated, remonstrative, condescending, embarrassing—and filled, to a surfeit, with affection.
    J.D. Salinger  --  Franny and Zooey
  • Would such gentlemen but consider the contemptible thoughts which the very women they are concerned with, in such cases as these, have of them, it would be a surfeit to them.
    Daniel Defoe  --  Moll Flanders
  • This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune,—often the surfeit of our own behaviour,—we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars; as if we were villains on necessity; fools by heavenly compulsion; knaves, thieves, and treachers by spherical pre-dominance; drunkards, liars, and adulterers by an enforced obedience of planetary influence; and all that we are evil in, by a divine thrusting on: an admirable evasion of whoremaster man,…
    William Shakespeare  --  King Lear
  • Whether Mrs Blifil had been surfeited with the sweets of marriage, or disgusted by its bitters, or from what other cause it proceeded, I will not determine; but she could never be brought to listen to any second proposals.
    Henry Fielding  --  Tom Jones
  • (for if there were any pleasure in it, they think the doing it so often should give one a surfeit of it); ’and what pleasure can one find in hearing the barking and howling of dogs, which seem rather odious than pleasant sounds?’
    Thomas More  --  Utopia
  • …perhaps crossing the campus on foot in the slightly Frenchified cloak and hat which he wore, or perhaps (I like to think this) presented formally to the man reclining in a flowered, almost feminised gown, in a sunny window in his chambers—this man handsome elegant and even catlike and too old to be where he was, too old not in years but in experience, with some tangible effluvium of knowledge, surfeit: of actions done and satiations plumbed and pleasures exhausted and even forgotten.
    William Faulkner  --  Absalom, Absalom!
  • — Though not by war, by surfeit die your king, As ours by murder, to make him a king!
    William Shakespeare  --  The Life and Death of King Richard III
  • To be charged with a surfeit of ambition cut deepest, it would appear.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • BERENGER: [surfeited and pretty weary] How do I know, then?
    Eugene Ionesco  --  Rhinoceros
  • But I am sure the younger of our nature, That surfeit on their ease, will day by day Come here for physic.
    William Shakespeare  --  All’s Well That Ends Well
  • I ate all the good food he had brought me, and I felt surfeited for the first time since I had been in durance.
    Roger Zelazny  --  Nine Princes in Amber
  • He had just secured a post with my neighbor, Alexander Hadfield, who presently had a surfeit of orders to fill.
    Geraldine Brooks  --  Year of Wonders
  • Ten would be a surfeit.
    George R.R. Martin  --  A Feast For Crows
  • Everywhere it reflected the authoritarian spandrels of his character, from its surfeit of policemen to its strict rules against picking flowers.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • The commonwealth is sick of their own choice; Their over-greedy love hath surfeited: An habitation giddy and unsure Hath he that buildeth on the vulgar heart.
    William Shakespeare  --  Henry IV, Part 2
  • His monstrous groin cries out to mount the wind As the mind cries out for subtleties worth thought And the heart for a sacrifice as thick as time: Hunger and surfeit gathered in one red heat.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • The Holy Church has a stomach healthy: Hath eaten many a land as forfeit, And never yet complained of surfeit: The Church alone, beyond all question, Has for ill-gotten goods the right digestion.
    Goethe (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)  --  Faust
  • That means both that you are exceptionally strong-willed and that you are able to suspend the functioning of your imagination—for it is an overactive imagination that turns men into cowards, not a surfeit of fear, as most believe.
    Christopher Paolini  --  Inheritance
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