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  • She was backed in a doorway with her gin and lime, being addressed by a saturnine spritely old gentleman with a hard red face and a hard clear voice and a puff of gray hair over each ear.
    Donna Tartt  --  The Goldfinch
  • He had a dark complexion and a small, wise, saturnine face with mournful pouches under both eyes.
    Joseph Heller  --  Catch-22
  • Somehow his words and his look did not seem to accord, or else it was that his cast of face made his smile look malignant and saturnine.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • A mediaeval doctor would have called him saturnine.
    James Joyce  --  Dubliners

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  • With Mr. Heathcliff, grim and saturnine, on the one hand, and Hareton, absolutely dumb, on the other, I made a somewhat cheerless meal, and bade adieu early.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • The Artful, meantime, who was of a rather saturnine disposition, and seldom gave way to merriment when it interfered with business, rifled Oliver’s pockets with steady assiduity.
    Charles Dickens  --  Oliver Twist
  • It was not, however, so saturnine a pride! she laughed continually; her laugh was satirical, and so was the habitual expression of her arched and haughty lip.
    Charlotte Bronte  --  Jane Eyre
  • THE CAP: (With saturnine spleen) Bah!
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • That stormy night when the knocker hammered on the door with such hurried urgency, she stood on the landing, clutching her wrapper to her and, looking down into the hall below, had one glimpse of Tony’s swarthy saturnine face before he leaned forward and blew out the candle in Frank’s hand.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • The face was saturnine and swarthy, and the sensual lips seemed to be twisted with disdain.
    Oscar Wilde  --  The Picture of Dorian Gray

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  • An angular, towering man, sad-faced and saturnine, wearing heavy-framed glasses, awkward in movement and sparing of speech, he stepped into the hallway, not bothering to glance at Graf.
    Pat Frank  --  Alas, Babylon
  • With black hair and dark eyes, her looks reflected her saturnine personality growing up.
    Nicholas Sparks  --  The Wedding
  • He twisted his heavy mouth into a faint smile—he was one of those saturnine people who smile with the corners of the mouth down,—and bowed his acknowledgment of my complaisance.
    H.G. Wells  --  The Island of Dr. Moreau
  • Having made up his mind on that point, he strode along without swerving, contracting some rather saturnine sternness, as a young man is likely to do who has a premature call upon him for self-reliance.
    George Eliot  --  The Mill on the Floss
  • The skin was puffed out under his sunken eyes, and its sallowness had paled to a leaden white against which his irregular eyebrows and long reddish moustache were relieved with a saturnine effect.
    Edith Wharton  --  The House of Mirth
  • …he has not found it, nor does he know who has got it; and we cannot say whether it will appear or not; and so, on that head, as some say that no second part has ever been good, and others that enough has been already written about Don Quixote, it is thought there will be no second part; though some, who are jovial rather than saturnine, say, ’Let us have more Quixotades, let Don Quixote charge and Sancho chatter, and no matter what it may turn out, we shall be satisfied with that.’
    Miguel de Cervantes  --  Don Quixote
  • Convocations of the honor court on the top floor of Durrell Hall were always conducted with an inflexible and saturnine efficiency.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Lords of Discipline
  • An environment which would have made a contented woman a poet, a suffering woman a devotee, a pious woman a psalmist, even a giddy woman thoughtful, made a rebellious woman saturnine.
    Thomas Hardy  --  The Return of the Native
  • Jude was asked if he could suggest any guest in addition to those named by Arabella and her father, and in a saturnine humour of perfect recklessness mentioned Uncle Joe, and Stagg, and the decayed auctioneer, and others whom he remembered as having been frequenters of the well-known tavern during his bout therein years before.
    Thomas Hardy  --  Jude the Obscure
  • Our readers will probably be divided in their opinions concerning this action; some may applaud it perhaps as an act of extraordinary humanity, while those of a more saturnine temper will consider it as a want of regard to that justice which every man owes his country.
    Henry Fielding  --  Tom Jones
  • Mr. Trumbull was to have the gold-headed cane and fifty pounds; the other second cousins and the cousins present were each to have the like handsome sum, which, as the saturnine cousin observed, was a sort of legacy that left a man nowhere; and there was much more of such offensive dribbling in favor of persons not present—problematical, and, it was to be feared, low connections.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Beneath, his face was lined and saturnine, with thin arched brows above large eyes as black and shiny as pools of coal oil.
    George R.R. Martin  --  A Storm of Swords
  • His countenance, by daylight, had a sort of amiably saturnine cast; he had a very large thin nose, and looked like a Spanish picture.
    Henry James  --  The American
  • He looked the car over slowly, critically, a long cigar clamped in the corner of his saturnine mouth, drawing his gauntlets off deliberately.
    Thomas Wolfe  --  Look Homeward, Angel
  • With us, after a long fast, some mouthfuls of bread and meat, a little moldy biscuit and salt beef triumphed over all our previous gloomy and saturnine thoughts.
    Jules Verne  --  A Journey to the Center of the Earth
  • "Somebody strike a light, my thumb’s out of joint," said one of the men, Parsons, a swarthy, saturnine man, boat-steerer in Standish’s boat, in which Harrison was puller.
    Jack London  --  Sea Wolf
  • Hugh Hungerford was slim and saturnine, long-legged, long-faced, clad in faded finery.
    George R.R. Martin  --  A Dance With Dragons
  • Grave in exterior, saturnine by temperament, formidable by his physical means, and dangerous from his lawless obstinacy, his self-constituted tribunal excited a degree of awe, to which even the intelligent Middleton could not bring himself to be entirely insensible.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Prairie
  • He pictured the saturnine Gottlieb not at all enjoying the triumph but, with locked door, abusing the papers for their exaggerative reports of his work; and as the picture became sharp Martin was like a subaltern stationed in a desert isle when he learns that his old regiment is going off to an agreeable Border war.
    Sinclair Lewis  --  Arrowsmith
  • Notwithstanding his humble rank, there was something in the mien and character of Sergeant Dunham that commanded respect: of a tall, imposing figure, grave and saturnine disposition, and accurate and precise in his acts and manner of thinking, even Cap, dogmatical and supercilious as he usually was with landsmen, did not presume to take the same liberties with the old soldier as he did with his other friends.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Pathfinder
  • Mallinson shouted; and Barnard, who had also been flung out of his seat, responded with a saturnine: "If he’s lucky.
    James Hilton  --  Lost Horizon
  • When some days afterward in reference to the singularity just mentioned, the Purser, a rather ruddy rotund person more accurate as an accountant than profound as a philosopher, said at mess to the Surgeon, "What testimony to the force lodged in will-power," the latter—saturnine, spare and tall, one in whom a discreet causticity went along with a manner less genial than polite, replied, "Your pardon, Mr. Purser.
    Herman Melville  --  Billy Budd
  • His instructor was a tall shaven man, with a yellow saturnine face.
    Thomas Wolfe  --  Look Homeward, Angel
  • Sour and saturnine, with a maimed hand, Hungerford had been company paymaster for a time, until the Tattered Prince had caught him stealing from the coffers and removed three of his fingers.
    George R.R. Martin  --  A Dance With Dragons
  • McGurk had bullied Dr. Tubbs now and then; Tubbs was compelled to scurry to his office as though he were a messenger boy; yet when he saw the saturnine eyes of Gottlieb, McGurk looked interested; and the two men, the bulky, clothes-conscious, powerful, reticent American and the cynical, simple, power-despising European, became friends.
    Sinclair Lewis  --  Arrowsmith
  • The two cousins were elderly men from Brassing, one of them conscious of claims on the score of inconvenient expense sustained by him in presents of oysters and other eatables to his rich cousin Peter; the other entirely saturnine, leaning his hands and chin on a stick, and conscious of claims based on no narrow performance but on merit generally: both blameless citizens of Brassing, who wished that Jonah Featherstone did not live there.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Some saturnine, sour-blooded persons might object to be constantly insisting on the merits of all articles from boot-jacks to "Berghems;" but Mr. Borthrop Trumbull had a kindly liquid in his veins; he was an admirer by nature, and would have liked to have the universe under his hammer, feeling that it would go at a higher figure for his recommendation.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • "Ay, brother Cap, I’ve seen something of the opinions which seafaring men have of themselves," returned the brother-in-law, with a smile as bland as comported with his saturnine features; "for I was many years one of the garrison in a seaport.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Pathfinder
  • the face was saturnine and swarthy, and the sensual lips...twisted with disdain
  • a saturnine, almost misanthropic young genius
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