To better see sample sentences using the word
miasma
please enable javascript.

Sample Sentences Using
miasma
Go to Word Detail Page
Go to Home Page
  • Jem, sitting beside him, was squint-eyed, miasmal, and mute, as he always was in the morning.
    Harper Lee  --  Go Set a Watchman
  • The red miasma swam before her eyes; her stomach churned in ITs rhythm.
    Madeleine L’Engle  --  A Wrinkle in Time
  • The ogress lunged forward then and Sophie felt herself engulfed in pink flannel, rouged cheeks, henna hair—a reddish miasma stinking of French perfume.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice
  • Clearly something had gone wrong, badly, only I wasn’t quite sure what—apart from knowing that I was responsible somehow, in the generalized miasma of shame and unworthiness and being-a-burden that never quite left me.
    Donna Tartt  --  The Goldfinch

  • Show more
  • She could smell the polluted miasma of the water, the dirt and diesel of the navy yard, the scent of small animals moving in the grass.
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Lost Souls
  • There was an earthy smell, as of some dry miasma, which came through the fouler air.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • The beaver ponds are never more than chest deep, but the water is cold, and as we slosh forward, our feet churn the muck on the bottom into a foul-smelling miasma of decomposing slime.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild
  • A foul wind rushed across the land, bringing with it a sulfurous miasma that made Roran cough and gag.
    Christopher Paolini  --  Eldest
  • Rank reeds and lush, slimy water-plants sent an odour of decay and a heavy miasmatic vapour onto our faces, while a false step plunged us more than once thigh-deep into the dark, quivering mire, which shook for yards in soft undulations around our feet.
    Arthur Conan Doyle  --  The Hound of the Baskervilles
  • Not just a patch of Koi, as he expected, but as much of Hiroshima as he could see through the clouded air was giving off a thick, dreadful miasma.
    John Hersey  --  Hiroshima

  • Show more again
  • Their discourse went forward in a miasma of sweat and heat that suggested a kind of indolence.
    David Guterson  --  Snow Falling on Cedars
  • These appearances, which bewilder you, are merely electrical phenomena not uncommon—or it may be that they have their ghastly origin in the rank miasma of the tarn.
    Edgar Allan Poe  --  The Fall of the House of Usher
  • The multicultural miasma, with its fixation on group identity and loyalty and authenticity, still unsettles him, though not quite as much as when he arrived last fall.
    Ron Suskind  --  A Hope in the Unseen
  • Again, he felt he moved in the miasma of a dream.
    Pat Frank  --  Alas, Babylon
  • Miasmas still inhabit it.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • Dickens uses a miasma, a literal and figurative fog, for the Court of Chancery, the English version of American probate court where estates are sorted out and wills contested, in Bleak House (1853).
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • —and, in the minds of both women and men, irrespective of age or circumstance, there began to grow, almost visibly, almost tangibly, the enormous, the incalculable miasma which is the leading feature of the Gaelic brain.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • He thought no longer, "Can I get on with people?" but "Are they stronger than I?" breathing the prevalent miasma.
    E.M. Forster  --  A Passage to India
  • …between the flinging of the two harpoons; and I think it may have been something more than that; the man who darted them happening, in the interval, to go in a trading ship on a voyage to Africa, went ashore there, joined a discovery party, and penetrated far into the interior, where he travelled for a period of nearly two years, often endangered by serpents, savages, tigers, poisonous miasmas, with all the other common perils incident to wandering in the heart of unknown regions.
    Herman Melville  --  Moby Dick
  • There is nothing so terrible as to be in an atmosphere of suspicion-to see eyes watching you and the look in them changing to fear-nothing so terrible as to suspect those near and dear to you …. It is poisonous-a miasma.
    Agatha Christie  --  The ABC Murders
  • It’s the source of a deadly miasma, a foul stench, indeed.
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  Fever, 1793
  • But now it was night, and all the miasmatic ravine about me was black; and beyond, instead of a green, sunlit slope, I saw a red fire, before which hunched, grotesque figures moved to and fro.
    H.G. Wells  --  The Island of Dr. Moreau
  • The ideas diffused by the reading of Lucetta’s letters at Peter’s Finger had condensed into a scandal, which was spreading like a miasmatic fog through Mixen Lane, and thence up the back streets of Casterbridge.
    Thomas Hardy  --  The Mayor of Casterbridge
  • But soon it will grow too hot, and the dank miasmas and summer diseases will be upon us, and I will complain about those in their turn.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Alias Grace
  • As well as smoke, a miasma of rotting meat drifted toward them—more slaughtered cavalry horses, hundreds of them, in a heap in a field.
    Ian McEwan  --  Atonement
  • You, who dare to regard us as the moral inferiors of any mystic who claims supernatural visions-you, who scramble like vultures for plundered pennies, yet honor a fortune-teller above a fortune maker-you, who scorn a businessman as ignoble, but esteem any posturing artist as exalted-the root of your standards is that mystic miasma which comes from primordial swamps, that cult of death, which pronounces a businessman immoral by reason of the fact that he keeps you alive.
    Ayn Rand  --  Atlas Shrugged
  • The odor of the devil-grass was a rank miasma.
    Stephen King  --  The Gunslinger
  • Gone—like other miasmas of her narrow mind!
    Zane Grey  --  The Call of the Canyon
  • The steamer waited, rolling in a swell, while from the shore seemed to belch a hot miasma.
    Sinclair Lewis  --  Arrowsmith
  • He was met by a miasma at once familiar and alarming, but he couldn’t place it.
    Abraham Verghese  --  Cutting for Stone
  • Max retched as a miasma radiated from the golden carriage, a nauseating smell of death and disease and brimstone.
    Henry H. Neff  --  The Second Siege
  • A miasma, he called it.
    Octavia Butler  --  Kindred
  • Metzger rushed in to find Oedipa rolling around, trying to get back on her feet, amid a great sticky miasma of fragrant lacquer.
    Thomas Pynchon  --  The Crying of Lot 49
  • They would see Exum in the hat bobbing along the rim of the swamp like a fisherman’s cork, elevated just a bit by the miasma and illusion of the landscape he moved in.
    Eudora Welty  --  The Collected Stories of Eudora Welty
  • They would see Exum in the hat bobbing along the rim of the swamp like a fisherman’s cork, elevated just a bit by the miasma and illusion of the landscape he moved in.
    Eudora Welty  --  The Golden Apples
  • A miasma of cinder-flecked smoke blackened its streets and at times reduced visibility to the distance of a single block, especially in winter, when coal furnaces were in full roar.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Some of his detractors likened his departure to that of Nirriti the Black, god of darkness and corruption, who had left Heaven filled with ill will and the miasma of many a dark curse.
    Roger Zelazny  --  Lord of Light
  • People had their own way of preparing for what was to come, but most simply stared ahead, gazing mutely at the band of flickering orange that was approaching through the miasma of black smoke.
    Henry H. Neff  --  The Maelstrom
  • The vials released clouds of green vapor when they broke, and any soldiers caught in the miasma fell to the ground, clutching their throats and thrashing as little brown mushrooms sprang up on every inch of exposed skin.
    Christopher Paolini  --  Inheritance
  • Like headache, fatigue, chills, and hot flashes, a subsequent depression or "melancholia" is also characteristic of the disease, which was thought then to emanate from stagnant water or foul air, "miasma," but, in fact, as would be learned a century later, is transmitted by mosquitoes.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • He also carried a large jar full of chlorine water, to keep off all miasmata.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • I’ve never eaten oysters that taste like cigars," I said through a miasma of smoke.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Lords of Discipline
  • In a terrible miasma of dog smell, which gripped him with fear and called "Run!
    Richard Adams  --  Watership Down
  • Or perhaps it is no lack of courage either not cowardice which will not face that sickness somewhere at the prime foundation of this factual scheme from which the prisoner soul, miasmal-distillant, wroils ever upward sunward, tugs its tenuous prisoner arteries and veins and prisoning in its turn that spark, that dream which, as the glob, and complete instant of its freedom mirrors and repeats (repeats?
    William Faulkner  --  Absalom, Absalom!
  • Later it gently separated at the seams and became vast billows traveling above the sea instead of a still white miasma.
    David Guterson  --  Snow Falling on Cedars
  • Is that what killed Polly? A miasma? I could feel the tears stinging my eyes, but I couldn’t escape, not with Grandfather holding my hand.
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  Fever, 1793
  • I didn’t run from the redcoats, and I won’t run from a dockside miasma.
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  Fever, 1793
  • The rest, with faces contorted from the strain of trying to listen, saw distant men gesturing wildly into the sound-killing miasma of whispers, coughs and creaking shoe leather.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Whether it was thin (a shama or nettala) or heavy as a blanket (in which case it was a gabby), it must keep the head warm and the mouth covered—no sun or wind should hit because these elements carried the mitch, the birrd, and other evil miasmas.
    Abraham Verghese  --  Cutting for Stone
  • It put a stop to torture, promulgated the truth, expelled miasma, rendered the century healthy, crowned the populace.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • Search for samples from other sources
Interest -- Source
General -- Google News®
General -- Time® Magazine
General -- Twitter®

Go to Home Page
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading