To better see sample sentences using the word
please enable javascript.

Sample Sentences Using
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Word Detail Page
Go to Home Page
  • meridian hour
  • all points on the same meridian have the same longitude
  • Dill was a curiosity because he was from Meridian, Mississippi, and was wise in the ways of the world.
    Harper Lee  --  Go Set a Watchman
  • This famous timepiece, always regulated on the Greenwich meridian, which was now some seventy-seven degrees westward, was at least four hours slow.
    Jules Verne  --  Around the World in 80 Days

  • Show more
  • The sun had nearly reached the meridian, and his scorching rays fell full on the rocks, which seemed themselves sensible of the heat.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • Open a passage; and I promise ye, Mistress Prynne shall be set where man, woman, and child may have a fair sight of her brave apparel from this time till an hour past meridian.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
  • On a globe, a Rose Line—also called a meridian or longitude—was any imaginary line drawn from the North Pole to the South Pole.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • The crown/meridian pressure point was one he had used countless times.
    Dan Brown  --  Angels & Demons
  • I feared my hopes were too bright to be realised; and I had enjoyed so much bliss lately that I imagined my fortune had passed its meridian, and must now decline.
    Charlotte Bronte  --  Jane Eyre
  • Heyward watched the sun, as he darted his meridian rays through the branches of the trees, and pined for the moment when the policy of Magua should change their route to one more favorable to his hopes.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Last of the Mohicans

  • Show more again
  • At midday the sky to the south warmed to rose-colour, and marked where the bulge of the earth intervened between the meridian sun and the northern world.
    Jack London  --  White Fang
  • All his blots upon my documents, were dropped there after twelve o’clock, meridian.
    Herman Melville  --  Bartleby, the Scrivener: a Story of Wall Street
  • Let us not be upset and overwhelmed in that terrible rapid and whirlpool called a dinner, situated in the meridian shallows.
    Henry David Thoreau  --  Walden
  • On July 20 we cut the Tropic of Capricorn at longitude 105░, and by the 27th of the same month, we had cleared the equator on the 110th meridian.
    Jules Verne  --  Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea
  • Listener, S. E. by E.: Narrator, N. W. by W.: on the 53rd parallel of latitude, N., and 6th meridian of longitude, W.: at an angle of 45 degrees to the terrestrial equator.
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • The group backed up a few yards to an old metal door, which Langdon now realized was located at the hallway’s central point—the meridian that divided the Senate Basement (SB) and the House Basement (HB).
    Dan Brown  --  The Lost Symbol
  • The old Baron had decreed a meridian-to-meridian rest from labors, and effort had been spent in the family city of Harko to create the illusion of gaiety: banners flew from buildings, new paint had been splashed on the walls along Court Way.
    Frank Herbert  --  Dune
  • Parallel meridians rudely pecked into the glass, surround these footpads’ goblets.
    Herman Melville  --  Moby Dick
  • The moon was now past the meridian and travelling down the west.
    H.G. Wells  --  The Island of Dr. Moreau
  • Sometimes towards Eden, which now in his view Lay pleasant, his grieved look he fixes sad; Sometimes towards Heaven, and the full-blazing sun, Which now sat high in his meridian tower: Then, much revolving, thus in sighs began.
    John Milton  --  Paradise Lost
  • Early in February the fleet crossed the 180th meridian, the International Dateline, and veterans like Mike initiated the men making their first crossing.
    James Bradley  --  Flags of Our Fathers
  • All that happened was that as the sun passed the meridian at Cape Town-it went out.
    Arthur C. Clarke  --  Childhood’s End
  • The North Star was directly in the wind’s eye, and since evening the Bear had swung round it outwardly to the east, till he was now at a right angle with the meridian.
    Thomas Hardy  --  Far from the Madding Crowd
  • By half-past five, post meridian, Horse Guards’ time, it has even elicited a new remark from the Honourable Mr. Stables, which bids fair to outshine the old one, on which he has so long rested his colloquial reputation.
    Charles Dickens  --  Bleak House
  • I cannot help promising myself, from such a dawn, that the meridian of this youth will be equal to that of either the elder or the younger Brutus.
    Henry Fielding  --  Tom Jones
  • I have touch’d the highest point of all my greatness; And from that full meridian of my glory, I haste now to my setting.
    William Shakespeare  --  Henry VIII
  • And just as the conclusions of the astronomers would have been vain and uncertain if not founded on observations of the seen heavens, in relation to a single meridian and a single horizon, so would my conclusions be vain and uncertain if not founded on that conception of right, which has been and will be always alike for all men, which has been revealed to me as a Christian, and which can always be trusted in my soul.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  Anna Karenina
  • Had the dwelling stood in an ordinary road, two persons setting out, one in each direction, might have made sure of overtaking her; but it was a hopeless task to seek for anybody on a heath in the dark, the practicable directions for flight across it from any point being as numerous as the meridians radiating from the pole.
    Thomas Hardy  --  The Return of the Native
  • The sun, now half-way to meridian, was hot and no breeze blew in that sheltered spot.
    Zane Grey  --  The Man of the Forest
  • This I would tell them, not under covert, but in words as clear as the sun in its meridian brightness.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • Remember the heats of July, my daughter; nor venture further than thou canst retrace before the meridian.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Pioneers
  • In North America, grid was parallels 35, 40, 45, 50 degrees north crossed by meridians 110, 115, 120 west, twelve targets.
    Robert A. Heinlein  --  The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
  • The meridian of the Royal Observatory at Greenwich, near London, is the prime meridian for reckoning the longitude of the world.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • The sun was about two hours past the meridian; the red walls of the desert were closing in; the V-shaped split where the Colorado cut through was in sight.
    Zane Grey  --  The Heritage of the Desert
  • "Why eat all that dirt?" he exclaimed, with an oriental energy of expression—about the only sort of energy you can find a trace of east of the fiftieth meridian.
    Joseph Conrad  --  Lord Jim
  • A first-class chronometer made by Boissonnas, of Geneva, set at the meridian of Hamburg, from which Germans calculate, as the English do from Greenwich, and the French from Paris.
    Jules Verne  --  A Journey to the Center of the Earth
  • An improved meridian groove and a sharper edge.
    Scott Westerfeld  --  The Secret Hour
  • At meridian the French ship was hull down, dead to leeward, the disparity of sailing on a wind being very great, and some islands were near by, behind which Jasper said it would be possible for the cutter to conceal her future movements.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Pathfinder
  • Quadruped; seen by star-light, and by the aid of a pocket-lamp, in the prairies of North America—see Journal for Latitude and Meridian.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Prairie
  • You mention’d me, For some instructions: I will tell you, sir, (Since we are met here in this height of Venice,) Some few perticulars I have set down, Only for this meridian, fit to be known Of your crude traveller, and they are these.
    Ben Jonson  --  Volpone
  • This traveller particularly mentions, on the subject of the great American desert, that a line may be drawn nearly parallel to the 20th degree of longitude *a (meridian of Washington), beginning from the Red River and ending at the River Platte.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 2
  • I’d been dreaming about New York—of Shari and me moving there, and finding no better place to live than a cardboard refrigerator box on some kind of highway meridian, and my having to get a job folding T-shirts—miles and miles of capped-sleeved T-shirts—at the Gap.
    Meg Cabot  --  Queen of Babble
  • From Shakespeare there gushed a flame of such marvellous splendor that men shaded their eyes as against the sun’s meridian glory; nor even when the works of his own elucidators were flung upon him did he cease to flash forth a dazzling radiance from beneath the ponderous heap.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  Earth’s Holocaust
  • The dials read: A.D. 2301 VENUS EARTH MARS Mean Solar Day 22 February 15 Duodecember 35 Noon + 09 0205 Greenwich 2220 Central Syrtis MOON IO GANYMEDE CALLISTO TITAN TRITON 2D3H 1D1H 6D8H 13D12H 15D3H 4D9H (eclipsed) (transit) Night, noon, summer, winterů without bothering to think, Reich could have rattled off the time and season for any meridian on any body in the solar system.
    Alfred Bester  --  The Demolished Man
  • Isaac lived in a small ranch house in Meridian Hills next to this fancy private school.
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • They are thin brown girls who have looked long at hollyhocks in the backyards of Meridian, Mobile, Aiken, and Baton Rouge.
    Toni Morrison  --  The Bluest Eye
  • Berta in Meridian and she living at ease oh-ah.
    August Wilson  --  The Piano Lesson
  • At Meridian the women got out with their children.
    Toni Morrison  --  Sula
  • Several leading Mississippi newspapers, including the Columbus Democrat, the Canton Mail and the Meridian Mercury, vigorously criticized Lamar, as didmany of his old friends, maintaining that he had surrendered Southern principle and honor.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • In Meridian (I had only gone ninety miles from Jackson) there was a wait of hours for the train that went from New Orleans to New York.
    Eudora Welty  --  One Writer’s Beginnings
  • Search for samples from other sources
Interest -- Source
General -- Google News®
General -- Time® Magazine
General -- Twitter®

Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Home Page . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading