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malign
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Sample Sentences Using
malign -- as in: malign his character
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  • I glared at her—the woman had maligned me—and then I noticed for the first time the swell in her belly and realized she was pregnant again.
    Gillian Flynn  --  Gone Girl
  • But to malign the good name of America’s greatest television judge—that’s below the belt."
    John Green  --  An Abundance of Katherines
  • He said the Taliban had attacked me not for my campaign for education but because I tried to "malign [their] efforts to establish the Islamic system."
    Malala Yousafzai  --  I Am Malala
  • I, knowing less than nothing, began maligning the food.
    Piper Kerman  --  Orange Is the New Black

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  • I wailed and gnashed my teeth over the fact that I had maligned a fellow student.
    Patrick Rothfuss  --  The Name of the Wind
  • "What that man say," said Big C. My be-kind-to-mongrel addresses usually degenerated into these backbiting arguments with Cindy Lou making deprecating remarks about the much-maligned Beau.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Water is Wide
  • He said he wanted to give dignity to those dances that Hollywood and the West had maligned.
    V.S. Naipaul  --  A Bend in the River
  • If she had not had the misfortune of being taken prisoner at the same time as so many of the Home Army members (a stroke of bad luck further complicated by her connection with Wanda, and their common dwelling place, even though she had not lifted a finger to help the Resistance), she might have been adjudged guilty of the serious crime of meat smuggling but not of the infinitely more grave crime of subversion, and hence might not be headed for a destination so forbiddingly malign.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice
  • Maraa Isabel feels she is being forced to have her daughter’s celebration with women who have maligned her as a bad mother.
    Sonia Nazario  --  Enrique’s Journey
  • Can it be that there is a malign influence of the sun at periods which affects certain natures, as at times the moon does others?
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula

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  • Before dinner the old prince, of whom she was always afraid, came into her room with a peculiarly restless and malign expression and went out again without saying a word.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  War and Peace
  • The picture seems to have a malign influence, for my mother rarely comes here without looking at it, and still more rarely does she look at it without weeping.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • He had never been suspected of stealing a silver tea-pot; he had been maligned respecting a mustard-pot, but it turned out to be only a plated one.
    Charles Dickens  --  A Tale of Two Cities
  • So long as you can keep disagreeing with each other violently enough and maligning each other in the popular press, and so long as you have clever agents, you can keep yourselves on the gravy train for life.
    Douglas Adams  --  The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
  • "Thou art right, Sancho," returned Don Quixote; "It will be wise to let the malign influence of the stars which now prevails pass off."
    Miguel de Cervantes  --  Don Quixote
  • But Aarfy was already back in the apartment when Yossarian arrived, and Yossarian gaped at him with that same sense of persecuted astonishment he had suffered that same morning over Bologna at his malign and cabalistic and irremovable presence in the nose of the plane.
    Joseph Heller  --  Catch-22
  • It is reported that Elders of the Church of England, uneasy about attributing to the deity so malign a purpose, have voted to replace the offending words with "Save us from the time of trial."
    Homer  --  The Odyssey
  • He was sure they were arranged in some order which had a secret and malign significance.
    Ambrose Bierce  --  An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge
  • Malign? I praise him.
    Frank Herbert  --  Dune
  • Duncan, in turning his eyes from the malign expression of Magua, suffered them to rest with pleasure on the smiling and polished features, and the noble military air, of the French general.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Last of the Mohicans
  • ’Who dares malign him?
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • A marsh it makes, that is named Styx, this dismal little stream, when it has descended to the foot of the malign gray slopes.
    Dante Alighieri  --  Dante’s Inferno
  • The word "influenza" actually means a malign influence from the stars.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • Hitherto I had merely thought myself impeded by the childish simplicity of the little people, and by some unknown forces which I had only to understand to overcome; but there was an altogether new element in the sickening quality of the Morlocks—a something inhuman and malign.
    H.G. Wells  --  The Time Machine
  • Where, he wonders for the umpteenth time, does using one’s talents to bring "glory onto God" end and the much maligned "pridefulness" begin?
    Ron Suskind  --  A Hope in the Unseen
  • My honour is as untouched as that of the bitterest enemy who ever maligned me.
    William Makepeace Thackeray  --  Vanity Fair
  • This familiar that I called out of my own soul, and sent forth alone to do his good pleasure, was a being inherently malign and villainous; his every act and thought centred on self; drinking pleasure with bestial avidity from any degree of torture to another; relentless like a man of stone.
    Robert Louis Stevenson  --  Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
  • Mr. Bounderby still walking up and down when Mrs. Pegler had done, Mr. Gradgrind addressed that maligned old lady: ’I am surprised, madam,’ he observed with severity, ’that in your old age you have the face to claim Mr. Bounderby for your son, after your unnatural and inhuman treatment of him.’
    Charles Dickens  --  Hard Times
  • His look went from brooder’s beard to carper’s skull, to remind, to chide them not unkindly, then to the baldpink lollard costard, guiltless though maligned.
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • A whole malign history burning cold and remote and black.
    Cormac McCarthy  --  All the Pretty Horses
  • He had spent years writing about the Masons’ rich tradition of metaphorical iconography and symbols, and knew that Masons had always been one of the most unfairly maligned and misunderstood organizations in the world.
    Dan Brown  --  The Lost Symbol
  • And the thews of Billy were hardly compatible with that sort of sensitive spiritual organisation which in some cases instinctively conveys to ignorant innocence an admonition of the proximity of the malign.
    Herman Melville  --  Billy Budd
  • But the malign was still there, as well as the mercifulness.
    James Agee  --  A Death in the Family
  • He darted round the table, pursued by the maligned Mrs. White armed with an antimacassar.
    W. W. Jacobs  --  The Monkey’s Paw
  • " cried one of them, to a sort of little, light-haired imp, with a well-favored and malign countenance, clinging to the acanthus leaves of a capital; "you are well named John of the Mill, for your two arms and your two legs have the air of four wings fluttering on the breeze.
    Victor Hugo  --  The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • He had his family where he seems to have wanted them—on an island, so to speak, safe from malign influences.
    Tracy Kidder  --  Mountains Beyond Mountains
  • She was incapable of elaborate artifice, and she resorted to no jocular device—to no affectation of the belief that she had been maligned—to learn what she desired.
    Henry James  --  Washington Square
  • One was inside the flat hung up in the kitchen and the other was-or should be-in the maligned bag.
    Agatha Christie  --  Early Cases Of Hercule Poirot
  • That Bathsheba could not endure this man was evident; in fact, he was continually coming to her with some tale or other, by which he might creep into favour at the expense of persons maligned.
    Thomas Hardy  --  Far from the Madding Crowd
  • But to men of Mr. Deane’s stamp, what goes on among the young people is as extraneous to the real business of life as what goes on among the birds and butterflies, until it can be shown to have a malign bearing on monetary affairs.
    George Eliot  --  The Mill on the Floss
  • He never felt angry with his father, because he did not wish to ally himself with his mother, who continually maligned the man.
    Milan Kundera  --  The Unbearable Lightness of Being
  • Eustacia was now no longer the goddess but the woman to him, a being to fight for, support, help, be maligned for.
    Thomas Hardy  --  The Return of the Native
  • He endlessly chastises fellow clients, lets loose bigoted tirades and maligns Robinson for offering safe harbor to those who cuss, smoke or otherwise violate his sense of civility.
    Steve Lopez  --  The Soloist
  • a scout, Through dark and desert ways with peril gone All night; at last by break of cheerful dawn Obtains the brow of some high-climbing hill, Which to his eye discovers unaware The goodly prospect of some foreign land First seen, or some renowned metropolis With glistering spires and pinnacles adorned, Which now the rising sun gilds with his beams: Such wonder seised, though after Heaven seen, The Spirit malign, but much more envy seised, At sight of all this world beheld so fair.
    John Milton  --  Paradise Lost
  • They were strollers and drop-ins, tourists and islanders alike who had come down to the bay for a late-night drink or something to eat and to look out at the forbidding statues repelling whatever malign spirits might at any moment emerge from the sea.
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Supremacy
  • When the rest of the Corps returns next week, you’ll see other privates like me, but I’m your first glimpse of this strange, maligned breed of cadet life.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Lords of Discipline
  • Lydgate was not at all sure that the Vicar maligned himself.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • They would seek for something else—some malign, treacherous, deceiving power which, in the face of God’s omniscience and omnipotence, still beguiles and betrays—and find it eventually in the error and perverseness of the human heart, which God has made, yet which He does not control, because He does not want to control it.
    Theodore Dreiser  --  An American Tragedy
  • One was an aged, dignified, stern-looking gentleman, clad as for a solemn festival in grave and costly attire, but with a great blood-stain on his richly wrought band; the second, an aged man, meanly dressed, with a dark and malign countenance, and a broken halter about his neck; the third, a person not so advanced in life as the former two, but beyond the middle age, wearing a coarse woollen tunic and leather breeches, and with a carpenter’s rule sticking out of his side pocket.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The House of the Seven Gables
  • One did not ask many questions of one’s father, but gradually the reasons became obvious: the mountains’ relative lack of mosquitoes, and their distance from the big towns and cities, full of malign influences for growing boys and girls and potentially more dangerous for everyone, given the country’s recent history of violence — a history largely unknown to Deo, and indecipherable, like the whispers of an overheard conversation among elders.
    Tracy Kidder  --  Strength in What Remains
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