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Sample Sentences Using
evince
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  • She displays little knowledge of the political realities, nor does she evince any awareness of underlying economic forces.
  • Heathcliff, why don’t you evince satisfaction at my pleasant news?
    Bronte, Emily  --  Wuthering Heights
  • I continued my caresses, and, when I prepared to go home, the animal evinced a disposition to accompany me.
    Edgar Allan Poe  --  The Black Cat
  • But when a long train of abuses and ... evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism,
    Thomas Jefferson et al.  --  The Declaration of Independence

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  • But it is in matters beyond the limits of mere rule that the skill of the analyst is evinced.
    Edgar Allan Poe  --  The Murders in the Rue Morgue
  • It was noted at the time and remarked upon afterwards, that in this final scene the good man evinced little or nothing of the perfunctory.
    Herman Melville  --  Billy Budd
  • The bitter little man who taught the course was the lone professor in the school who had guts enough to try to teach it, and even he evinced the rigidity of imperfect understanding.
    Harper Lee  --  Go Set a Watchman
  • If Sebastian thought it odd that the Queen greeted her courtiers standing naked in the middle of her bedchamber, he did not evince it by any quirk of expression.
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Heavenly Fire
  • Nevertheless, during the two weeks which followed, one or more wolves used the track past my tent almost every night — and never, except on one memorable occasion, did they evince the slightest interest in me.
    Farley Mowat  --  Never Cry Wolf
  • This complaint evinced a chorus of agreement, but Molly was silent.
    Christina Baker Kline  --  Orphan Train

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  • The Forsaken’s hand dangled limply, but it kept coming on toward them, evincing no sign of pain.
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Bones
  • Billings evinced no surprise.
    Ayn Rand  --  The Fountainhead
  • And in what manner has this congeniality of mind been evinced?
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • He seemed to feel that he had succeeded in explaining the soccer field issue with perfect clarity, and evinced no hostility toward me for my bothersome questions.
    Warren St. John  --  Outcasts United
  • Anna Mikhaylovna evinced no surprise, she only smiled faintly and sighed, as if to say that this was no more than she had expected.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  War and Peace
  • Without evincing any inclination to come in again, he there delivered his valedictory remarks.
    Charles Dickens  --  Great Expectations
  • A few words from her, evincing a dislike to Heathcliff, were enough to rouse in him all his old hatred of the boy.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • Marie was in utter despair at the entire want of moral perception evinced in this reply.
    Harriet Beecher Stowe  --  Uncle Tom’s Cabin
  • This time the clerks evinced no inclination to laugh, such a real ear clipper did Porthos appear.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Three Musketeers
  • Thornton stood between him and Buck, and evinced no intention of getting out of the way.
    Jack London  --  The Call of the Wild
  • Jace, who had evinced only the barest interest in anything going on around him until now, jerked upright.
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Fallen Angels
  • I was delighted with all she showed me, for indeed her hut and its fittings evinced no ordinary skill and ingenuity.
    Johann Wyss  --  The Swiss Family Robinson
  • The messenger rode back at an easy trot, stopping pretty often at ale-houses by the way to drink, but evincing a tendency to keep his own counsel, and to keep his hat cocked over his eyes.
    Charles Dickens  --  A Tale of Two Cities
  • She was sensible of all the affection it evinced.
    Jane Austen  --  Emma
  • If a slave was convicted of any high misdemeanor, became unmanageable, or evinced a determination to run away, he was brought immediately here, severely whipped, put on board the sloop, carried to Baltimore, and sold to Austin Woolfolk, or some other slave-trader, as a warning to the slaves remaining.
    Frederick Douglass  --  The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • The wolf-dogs, clustered on the far side of the fire, snarled and bickered among themselves, but evinced no inclination to stray off into the darkness.
    Jack London  --  White Fang
  • I was easily led by the sympathy which he evinced to use the language of my heart, to give utterance to the burning ardour of my soul and to say, with all the fervour that warmed me, how gladly I would sacrifice my fortune, my existence, my every hope, to the furtherance of my enterprise.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • Since the day by the pond when she had refused to listen to his plea for forgiveness, Gilbert, save for the aforesaid determined rivalry, had evinced no recognition whatever of the existence of Anne Shirley.
    Lucy Maud Montgomery  --  Anne Of Green Gables
  • This continued, and Tom began to evince a growing distress.
    Mark Twain  --  The Prince and The Pauper
  • He thought it very discouraging that his wife, who was the sole object of his existence, evinced so little interest in things which concerned him, and valued so little his conversation.
    Kate Chopin  --  The Awakening
  • Yossarian marveled that children could suffer such barbaric sacrifice without evincing the slightest hint of fear or pain.
    Joseph Heller  --  Catch-22
  • Poor fellow! thought I, he means no mischief; it is plain he intends no insolence; his aspect sufficiently evinces that his eccentricities are involuntary.
    Herman Melville  --  Bartleby, the Scrivener: a Story of Wall Street
  • It may seem unwarrantable to couple in any respect the mast-head standers of the land with those of the sea; but that in truth it is not so, is plainly evinced by an item for which Obed Macy, the sole historian of Nantucket, stands accountable.
    Herman Melville  --  Moby Dick
  • "I am afraid," replied Elinor, "that the pleasantness of an employment does not always evince its propriety."
    Jane Austen  --  Sense and Sensibility
  • One afternoon, the Dodger and Master Bates being engaged out that evening, the first-named young gentleman took it into his head to evince some anxiety regarding the decoration of his person (to do him justice, this was by no means an habitual weakness with him); and, with this end and aim, he condescendingly commanded Oliver to assist him in his toilet, straightway.
    Charles Dickens  --  Oliver Twist
  • I was not aware of it myself, but I felt it necessary to uphold the institutions of my county, and to evince a familiarity with them; so I shook my head, as much as to say, ’I believe you!’
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • Friendship between man and man; what a rugged strength there was in it, as evinced by these two.
    Thomas Hardy  --  The Mayor of Casterbridge
  • But as she grew older she evinced so much intelligence, and was so faithful, that her master and mistress could not help seeing it was for their interest to take care of such a valuable piece of property.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • The only response the other two magicians evinced at the death of their companion was to increase the speed of their invocation.
    Christopher Paolini  --  Brisingr
  • And she was staring at him with the same level gaze, evincing no emotion, no thought.
    Anne Rice  --  Interview with the Vampire
  • In his fourth combat with De Grantmesnil, the Disinherited Knight showed as much courtesy as he had hitherto evinced courage and dexterity.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • Next Spanish hides, with the tails still preserving their twist and the angle of elevation they had when the oxen that wore them were careering over the pampas of the Spanish Main—a type of all obstinacy, and evincing how almost hopeless and incurable are all constitutional vices.
    Henry David Thoreau  --  Walden
  • They looked at Stephen’s worn face, rendered more pathetic by the homely emotions it evinced; and, in the kindness of their nature, they were more sorry than indignant.
    Charles Dickens  --  Hard Times
  • Giovanni’s face evinced many contending emotions.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  Rappaccini’s Daughter
  • Unmistakably bad men evinced an apparently sincere admiration for virtue.
    Stephen Crane  --  Maggie: A Girl of the Streets
  • They observed by my teeth, which they viewed with great exactness, that I was a carnivorous animal; yet most quadrupeds being an overmatch for me, and field mice, with some others, too nimble, they could not imagine how I should be able to support myself, unless I fed upon snails and other insects, which they offered, by many learned arguments, to evince that I could not possibly do.
    Jonathan Swift  --  Gulliver’s Travels
  • He spent years and years in desultory studies, undertakings, and meditations; he began to evince considerable indifference to social forms and observances.
    Thomas Hardy  --  Tess of the d’Urbervilles
  • How could it be otherwise, when Helen, at all times and under all circumstances, evinced for me a quiet and faithful friendship, which ill-humour never soured, nor irritation never troubled?
    Charlotte Bronte  --  Jane Eyre
  • But to beleeve they be in no place, that is to say, no where, that is to say, nothing, as they (though indirectly) say, that will have them Incorporeall, cannot by Scripture bee evinced.
    Thomas Hobbes  --  Leviathan
  • On the wallabove a cupboard, invisible save at night,by lamp light and even then evincing an enigmatic profundity because it had but one hand, a cabinet clock ticked, then with a preliminary sound as ifit had cleared its throat, struck five times.
    William Faulkner  --  The Sound and the Fury
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