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cupidity
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cupidity
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  • She told of the cupidity that led to the company’s collapse.
  • And I could not imagine a human being so blinded by cupidity as to sell poison to such an atrocious creature.
    Conrad, Joseph  --  The Mirror of the Sea
  • ...was one whose discernment detects crime in any, but whose cupidity exposes it only in the penniless.
    Melville, Herman  --  Moby Dick I-LXVII
  • The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.
    C. S. Lewis

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  • "Aye, that I will," said the Sheriff, his cupidity casting his caution to the winds.
    McSpadden, J. Walker  --  Robin Hood
  • How about I use my insatiable cupidity to beat the crap out of you?
    Homer Hickam  --  October Sky
  • "I hope it may be so," replied Caderousse, his face flushed with cupidity.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • These people hated me with the hatred of cupidity and disappointment.
    Charles Dickens  --  Great Expectations
  • But the cupidity of the Indian was soon gratified, and the different bodies again moved slowly onward.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Last of the Mohicans
  • Oh blind cupidity, both guilty and mad, that so spurs us in the brief life, and then, in the eternal, steeps us so ill!
    Dante Alighieri  --  Dante’s Inferno

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  • And he thought: I must catch his mind as well as his cupidity.
    Frank Herbert  --  Dune
  • Nevertheless, knowing the weakness of her husband, and more particularly his cupidity, she did not despair of bringing him round to her purpose.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Three Musketeers
  • Sending the plate, which had so excited Fagin’s cupidity, to the banker’s; and leaving Giles and another servant in care of the house, they departed to a cottage at some distance in the country, and took Oliver with them.
    Charles Dickens  --  Oliver Twist
  • BELLA: (Her eyes hard with anger and cupidity, points) Who’s to pay for that?
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • He had long known that the delusion was partly due to a trap laid for him by Dunstan, who saw in his brother’s degrading marriage the means of gratifying at once his jealous hate and his cupidity.
    George Eliot  --  Silas Marner
  • I learned afterwards that my dress, and that of Mrs. Bruce’s children, had been described to him by some of the Northern tools, which slaveholders employ for their base purposes, and then indulge in sneers at their cupidity and mean servility.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • The rest was left contingent on the value of my professional exertions; in other and more expressive words, on the baseness of my nature, the cupidity of my motives, the poverty of my family, the general moral (or rather immoral) resemblance between myself and — HEEP.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • "The bounty," returned the other, looking up at his attentive companion in a cool, sullen manner, in which, however, heartless cupidity and indifference to the means were far more conspicuous than any feelings of animosity or revenge.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Deerslayer
  • Dorothea left Ladislaw’s two letters unread on her husband’s writing-table and went to her own place, the scorn and indignation within her rejecting the reading of these letters, just as we hurl away any trash towards which we seem to have been suspected of mean cupidity.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Where imposture, ignorance, and brutal cupidity, are the stock in trade of a small body of men, and one is described by these characteristics, all his fellows will recognise something belonging to themselves, and each will have a misgiving that the portrait is his own.
    Charles Dickens  --  Nicholas Nickleby
  • Obsequiousness, servility, cupidity roused by the prevailing smell of money.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Man And Superman
  • The curses of Heaven light on the cupidity that has destroyed such a race.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Pioneers
  • Keeping oneself occupied with mathematics, I say, is the best medicine for cupidity.
    Thomas Mann  --  The Magic Mountain
  • At one time he seems animated by the most selfish cupidity, at another by the most lively patriotism.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 2
  • American legislators are more apt to give men credit for intelligence than for honesty, and they rely not a little on personal cupidity for the execution of the laws.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1
  • Have there not been as many wars founded upon commercial motives since that has become the prevailing system of nations, as were before occasioned by the cupidity of territory or dominion?
    Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, & John Jay  --  The Federalist Papers
  • The struggle between thirst for vengeance and cupidity was severe but short.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Prairie
  • I observed with disillusioned clarity the despicable nonentity of the street; its porches; its window curtains; the drab clothes, the cupidity and complacency of shopping women; and old men taking the air in comforters; the caution of people crossing; the universal determination to go on living, when really, fools and gulls that you are, I said, any slate may fly from a roof, any car may swerve, for there is neither rhyme nor reason when a drunk man staggers about with a club in his…
    Virginia Woolf  --  The Waves
  • So intolerable indeed is it regarded by some, that no cupidity could persuade them to moor alongside of it.
    Herman Melville  --  Moby Dick
  • "Do you think so?" answered d’Artagnan, but little convinced, as he knew better than anyone else how entirely personal the value of this letter was, and was nothing in it likely to tempt cupidity.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Three Musketeers
  • But the chevaux-de-frise of branches now lay within reach of his arm, and the very appearance of precaution it presented, as it announced the value of the effects it encircled, tempted his cupidity, and induced him to proceed.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Prairie
  • So far from opposing any remonstrance to the rude and violent manner in which his conquerors performed the customary office, he even anticipated their cupidity, by tendering to the chiefs such articles as he thought might prove the most acceptable.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Prairie
  • Nor was the sword of death stayed until cupidity got the mastery of revenge.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Last of the Mohicans
  • I never saw such an expression of cupidity as the flickering lamp revealed in those two countenances.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • In short, the motive that urged them both so soon to go against the Hurons, was an habitual contempt of their enemy, acting on the unceasing cupidity of prodigality.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Deerslayer
  • The Americans frequently term what we should call cupidity a laudable industry; and they blame as faint-heartedness what we consider to be the virtue of moderate desires.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1
  • It was agreed generally, and all understood the weaknesses and tastes of Indians, that nothing could be more likely to tempt the cupidity of the Iroquois than the elephants, in particular.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Deerslayer
  • The appearance of such a train, in that bleak and solitary place, was rendered the more remarkable by the fact, that the surrounding country offered so little, that was tempting to the cupidity of speculation, and, if possible, still less that was flattering to the hopes of an ordinary settler of new lands.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Prairie
  • Marner’s cottage had no thatch; and Dunstan’s first act, after a train of thought made rapid by the stimulus of cupidity, was to go up to the bed; but while he did so, his eyes travelled eagerly over the floor, where the bricks, distinct in the fire-light, were discernible under the sprinkling of sand.
    George Eliot  --  Silas Marner
  • Generally, these interviews were pacific; for the whites had a common enemy to dread, in the ancient and perhaps more lawful occupants of the country; but instances were not rare, in which jealousy and cupidity had caused them to terminate in scenes of the most violent and ruthless treachery.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Prairie
  • It was scarcely necessary to do this, but Miss Squeers was as good as her word; and poor Nicholas, in addition to bad food, dirty lodging, and the being compelled to witness one dull unvarying round of squalid misery, was treated with every special indignity that malice could suggest, or the most grasping cupidity put upon him.
    Charles Dickens  --  Nicholas Nickleby
  • The American lauds as a noble and praiseworthy ambition what our own forefathers in the Middle Ages stigmatized as servile cupidity, just as he treats as a blind and barbarous frenzy that ardor of conquest and martial temper which bore them to battle.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 2
  • But in America the people regards this prosperity as the result of its own exertions; the citizen looks upon the fortune of the public as his private interest, and he co-operates in its success, not so much from a sense of pride or of duty, as from what I shall venture to term cupidity.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1
  • He would have rejoiced to know the position of the camp before it had been alarmed by the escape of Hist, but it would be too hazardous now to venture to land, and he reluctantly relinquished for the night the ruthless designs that cupidity and revenge had excited him to entertain.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Deerslayer
  • The one joy after which his soul thirsted was to have a money-changer’s shop on a much-frequented quay, to have locks all round him of which he held the keys, and to look sublimely cool as he handled the breeding coins of all nations, while helpless Cupidity looked at him enviously from the other side of an iron lattice.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • The costume of the votary of music had undergone no other alteration from that so lately described, except that he had covered his bald head with the triangular beaver, which had not proved sufficiently alluring to excite the cupidity of any of his captors.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Last of the Mohicans
  • It did not make humanity or kindness its law, but it extolled generosity; it set more store on liberality than on benevolence; it allowed men to enrich themselves by gambling or by war, but not by labor; it preferred great crimes to small earnings; cupidity was less distasteful to it than avarice; violence it often sanctioned, but cunning and treachery it invariably reprobated as contemptible.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 2
  • "And who will thank you for the same, after what has been already done?" muttered Abiram, with a grin of disappointed cupidity, in which malignity and terror were disgustingly united; "when the devil has once made out his account, you may look for your receipt in full only at his hands."
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Prairie
  • There was no odious cupidity in Mr. Borthrop Trumbull—nothing more than a sincere sense of his own merit, which, he was aware, in case of rivalry might tell against competitors; so that if Peter Featherstone, who so far as he, Trumbull, was concerned, had behaved like as good a soul as ever breathed, should have done anything handsome by him, all he could say was, that he had never fished and fawned, but had advised him to the best of his experience, which now extended over twenty…
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Caleb Garth, having little expectation and less cupidity, was interested in the verification of his own guesses, and the calmness with which he half smilingly rubbed his chin and shot intelligent glances much as if he were valuing a tree, made a fine contrast with the alarm or scorn visible in other faces when the unknown mourner, whose name was understood to be Rigg, entered the wainscoted parlor and took his seat near the door to make part of the audience when the will should be…
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
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