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Sample Sentences Using
consonant -- as in: consonant or vowel?
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as in: consonant or vowel? Define
a letter of the alphabet (or a speech sound) that is not a vowel
  • She stresses the last consonants or her words.
  • Sometimes ’y’ is a vowel and sometimes it’s a consonant.
    Louis Sachar  --  Holes
  • ...he dabbled in dialects; he had even evolved quite a brilliant table for the vowel and consonant changes from Latin into Spanish and from Spanish into Indian-Spanish.
    Thornton Wilder  --  The Bridge of San Luis Rey
  • Don’t get me wrong I remember that feeling well—knowing exactly what you want to say, but your lips can’t quite manage the correct combination of vowels and consonants to form the words.
    Ellen Hopkins  --  Glass

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  • True, his speech could be slurred and thick and spiked with all the grammar of modem invention, and it could turn surly with just the right inflection, dropping consonants and studding what was left with mothers and dudes and cools and bads, deep with the ghetto undercurrent of pending violence.
    Tim O’Brien  --  Going After Cacciato
  • They listen to a tape of consonant sounds, and then practice what they hear for ten minutes.
    Chang-rae Lee  --  Native Speaker
  • He is the only dog I ever knew who could pronounce the consonant F. This is because his front teeth are crooked,
    John Steinbeck  --  Travels with Charley
  • A special spot-wavex-scrambler also caused his televised image, in the area immediately about his lips, to mouth the vowels and consonants beautifully.
    Ray Bradbury  --  Fahrenheit 451
  • He tried desperately not to think about the treacherous consonants lying ahead of him, just waiting to trip him up and stick in his throat, but when he spoke, the words came out fluently like beautiful butterflies taking flight.
    Malala Yousafzai  --  I Am Malala
  • The consonants would be horizontal then?
    Patrick Rothfuss  --  The Name of the Wind

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  • The old man showed an early knack for consonants.
    Jerry Spinelli  --  Maniac Magee
  • I know it’s hard to pronounce, foreign, unlovely to those who don’t understand—a peculiar jumble of unmatched consonants.
    Christina Baker Kline  --  Orphan Train
  • Then, from somewhere deep inside the earpiece, a stream of consonants issues forth.
    Anthony Doerr  --  All the Light We Cannot See
  • It was a kind of lubricated diction in which many of the more briery Polish-accented consonants became magically smoothed over.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice
  • I had no idea what had been said, but I thought I recognized that voice, deep but soft, with a spiky way of clipping the final consonants.
    Diana Gabaldon  --  Outlander
  • Only consonants.
    Rick Riordan  --  The Red Pyramid
  • I will quote two more lines, one for consonants, and one for vowels.
    Homer  --  The Odyssey
  • Most modern Semitic alphabets have no vowels and use nekkudot—tiny dots and dashes written either below or within the consonants—to indicate what vowel sound accompanies them.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • Hekate spoke in a deep, almost masculine voice, touched with an accent that had all the hissing sibilants of Greece and the liquid consonants of Persia.
    Micheal Scott  --  The Alchemyst
  • Prolix, quartz, quandary, rylpb, rhythm, all the old tricks with consonants I could dream up or remember.
    Margaret Atwood  --  The Handmaid’s Tale
  • She spoke in the soft slurring voice of the coastal Georgian, liquid of vowels, kind to consonants and with the barest trace of French accent.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • But Fitzgerald keeps the Greek consonants and vowels.
    Homer  --  The Iliad
  • The voice was low and musical, with a slight sing-song in it, and a faint SOUPCON of foreign intonation in the pronunciation of the consonants.
    Baroness Orczy  --  The Scarlet Pimpernel
  • All these young, maniacal, puny, merry incoherences lived in harmony together, and the result was an eccentric and agreeable being whom his comrades, who were prodigal of winged consonants, called Jolllly .
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • Nothing like the Teuton race for confusing its consonants.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • He had not even remembered that it was low-pitched, with a faint roughness on the consonants.
    Edith Wharton  --  The Age of Innocence
  • It’s just a slight sharpness to the consonants, that’s all.
    Anne Rice  --  Interview with the Vampire
  • He wanted me to study his tongue positions as he demonstrated the pronunciation of consonants, diphthongs, long and short vowels.
    Don DeLillo  --  White Noise
  • The soft consonants suggested an unthinkable obscenity, the sibilant ending whispered the family’s shame.
    Ian McEwan  --  Atonement
  • As if I ever stop thinking about the girl and her confounded vowels and consonants.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Pygmalion
  • Only an insane contortion of spelling could portray his lyric whine, his mangled consonants.
    Sinclair Lewis  --  Main Street
  • Nevertheless, it was identifiably Oriental; the accent was southern China, the pitch, the short vowels and sharp consonants sounding of Cantonese.
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Supremacy
  • He who first opens Chaucer, or any other ancient poet, is so much struck with the obsolete spelling, multiplied consonants, and antiquated appearance of the language, that he is apt to lay the work down in despair, as encrusted too deep with the rust of antiquity, to permit his judging of its merits or tasting its beauties.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • It is the way Chinese sounds, chingchong ugly, to American ears, not beautiful like Japanese sayonara words with the consonants and vowels as regular as Italian.
    Maxine Hong Kingston  --  The Woman Warrior
  • A hooded figure stood in the doorway and for a second the Consul thought it was Het Masteen, but then he realized that this man was much shorter, his voice not accented with the stilted Templar consonants.
    Dan Simmons  --  Hyperion
  • And she murmured "How charming it is!" with a stress on the opening consonants of the adjective, a token of her refinement by which she felt her lips so romantically compressed, like the petals of a beautiful, budding flower, that she instinctively brought her eyes into harmony, illuminating them for a moment with a vague and sentimental gaze.
    Marcel Proust  --  Swann’s Way
  • …only at wide intervals filled with homesickness for the sheer boards and nails, the earth and trees and shrubs, which composed the place which was a foreign land to her and her people; when she spoke even now, after forty years, among the slurred consonants and the flat vowels of the land where her life had been cast, New England talked as plainly as it did in the speech of her kin who had never left New Hampshire and whom she had seen perhaps three times in her life, her forty years.
    William Faulkner  --  Light in August
  • Fred wrote the lines demanded in a hand as gentlemanly as that of any viscount or bishop of the day: the vowels were all alike and the consonants only distinguishable as turning up or down, the strokes had a blotted solidity and the letters disdained to keep the line—in short, it was a manuscript of that venerable kind easy to interpret when you know beforehand what the writer means.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • But I’m not listening to it, or even paying any attention to the vowels and consonants.
    Sophie Kinsella  --  Confessoins of a Shopaholic
  • In this document there are one hundred and thirty-two letters, giving seventy-nine consonants to fifty-three vowels.
    Jules Verne  --  A Journey to the Center of the Earth
  • He turned red, thinking of his trouble with long a’s, th’s, l’s, consonants at the ends of words.
    Gish Jen  --  Typical American
  • As for the consonants, the colonists seem to have resisted valiantly that tendency to slide over them which arose in England after the Restoration.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • Avram had to install the windows himself, they came from the plate-glass factory where he worked, glass so thin you had to come away from the window to talk, A word with too many consonants might shatter the glass.
    Don DeLillo  --  Underworld
  • 1992 I want to keep playing with verbs Write letters to old friends And ask them to keep writing I want to hold on to the lives of consonants and vowels In a world of zero tolerance, talking like this about my addiction—even saying it out loud on the radio—may mean artistic suicide.
    Jay Allison, et al.  --  This I Believe II
  • On the contrary, this slippery syllable with its lingual and labial consonants and scanty vowel in the middle really began to disgust him after a while, conjuring up for him somehow images of watery milk—something whitish-blue and insipid, particularly when compared with all the robust fodder that Dr. Krokowski was serving up.
    Thomas Mann  --  The Magic Mountain
  • The naval officer spoke in a particularly sonorous, musical, and aristocratic baritone voice, pleasantly swallowing his r’s and generally slurring his consonants: the voice of a man calling out to his servant, "Heah!
    Leo Tolstoy  --  War and Peace
  • This is about the proportion found in most southern languages, the idioms of the north being much more rich in consonants.
    Jules Verne  --  A Journey to the Center of the Earth
  • The sibilant s, followed by a flat vowel and hard consonants.
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Supremacy
  • Show me the consonants.
    Patrick Rothfuss  --  The Name of the Wind
  • There are words which are composed wholly of consonants, such as mm. rnlls, others which are nearly all vowels, the fifth, for instance, which is unteief, and one of the last oseibo.
    Jules Verne  --  A Journey to the Center of the Earth
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To see samples using other meanings of consonant, click a word sense below:
as in: consonant or vowel? Define
a letter of the alphabet (or a speech sound) that is not a vowel
as in: in consonance with Define
in keeping with (or in harmony with)
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