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  • The committee is characterized by chaos and calumny.
  • We can expect calumny from our critics.
  • He denied all such allegations as "lies, calumny, and manipulation."
  • I had given him no ground for that particular calumny.
    Conrad, Joseph  --  Chance

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  • Be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as snow, thou shalt not escape calumny. Get thee to a nunnery, go.
    William Shakespeare
  • be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as snow, thou shalt not escape calumny.
    William Shakespeare  --  Hamlet, Prince of Denmark
  • In Proctor’s presence a fool felt his foolishness instantly-and a Proctor is always marked for calumny therefore.
    Arthur Miller  --  The Crucible
  • back-wounding calumny
    William Shakespeare  --  Measure for Measure
  • This is not a Corsican arbor, but an English garden; badly kept, I own, but still you must not calumniate it for that.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • Yes, but calumny seized upon all those follies in which I took no part, as you well know, my Lord.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Three Musketeers

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  • He looked about imploringly for help in defending his country’s future against the obnoxious calumnies of this sly and sinful assailant.
    Joseph Heller  --  Catch-22
  • Few or none of the famous men that have lived escaped being calumniated by malice.
    Miguel de Cervantes  --  Don Quixote
  • They go the length of declaring that this honest creature would do anything for money, that the HISPANIOLA belonged to him, and that he sold it me absurdly high—the most transparent calumnies.
    Robert Louis Stevenson  --  Treasure Island
  • He had only just been protesting against Luzhin’s calumny and declaring that he had seen the girl last night for the first time, and suddenly she had walked in.
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  Crime and Punishment
  • During this phase he was no longer obliged to arrange gentlemen’s pleasures, nor to plant little harvests of calumny.
    Thornton Wilder  --  The Bridge of San Luis Rey
  • OEDIPUS Thou shalt rue it Twice to repeat so gross a calumny.
    Sophocles  --  Oedipus the King
  • I declare, it’s positive calumny.’
    Ivan Turgenev  --  Fathers and Sons
  • You would have had to put up with indiscreet questions, calumny, contempt, insult perhaps.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • He complain’d to me that they were grievously calumniated by the zealots of other persuasions, and charg’d with abominable principles and practices, to which they were utter strangers.
    Benjamin Franklin  --  The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
  • An attempt at divorce could lead to nothing but a public scandal, which would be a perfect godsend to his enemies for calumny and attacks on his high position in society.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  Anna Karenina
  • I love men genuinely, I’ve been greatly calumniated!
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  The Brothers Karamazov
  • All were silent; for none thought it safe, in the presence of the Grand Master, to avow any interest in the calumniated prisoner, lest he should be suspected of leaning towards Judaism.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • He too loved Aziz, and knew he was calumniated; but faith did not rule his heart, and he prated of "policy" and "evidence" in a way that saddened the Englishman.
    E.M. Forster  --  A Passage to India
  • What an abominable calumny!
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • The reasons he supported the compromise, the effect of his support and the calumnies he suffered are detailed in Chapter III.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • ’Refute these calumnies,’ said Kate, ’and be more patient, so that you may give them no advantage.
    Charles Dickens  --  Nicholas Nickleby
  • One who had reproached him for deserting her when calumniated, who had urged claims upon his consideration on that account, who had lived waiting for him, who at the first decent opportunity had come to ask him to rectify, by making her his, the false position into which she had placed herself for his sake; such she had been.
    Thomas Hardy  --  The Mayor of Casterbridge
  • Of such insolences and attempted slights he, of course, took no notice, and in the opinion of most people his frank debonair manner, his charming boyish smile, and the infinite grace of that wonderful youth that seemed never to leave him, were in themselves a sufficient answer to the calumnies, for so they termed them, that were circulated about him.
    Oscar Wilde  --  The Picture of Dorian Gray
  • …hewn, and rocks of gold; The palace of great Lucifer, (so call That structure in the dialect of men Interpreted,) which not long after, he Affecting all equality with God, In imitation of that mount whereon Messiah was declared in sight of Heaven, The Mountain of the Congregation called; For thither he assembled all his train, Pretending so commanded to consult About the great reception of their King, Thither to come, and with calumnious art Of counterfeited truth thus held their ears.
    John Milton  --  Paradise Lost
  • From the evil seed of lust all other deadly sins had sprung forth: pride in himself and contempt of others, covetousness in using money for the purchase of unlawful pleasures, envy of those whose vices he could not reach to and calumnious murmuring against the pious, gluttonous enjoyment of food, the dull glowering anger amid which he brooded upon his longing, the swamp of spiritual and bodily sloth in which his whole being had sunk.
    James Joyce  --  A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
  • He must make himself proof against calumny.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • Partridge likewise shovelled in his share of calumny, and (what may surprize the reader) not only bespattered the maid, but attempted to sully the lily-white character of Sophia herself.
    Henry Fielding  --  Tom Jones
  • …and The justice of your hearts will thereto add, "Tis pity she’s not honest, honourable’: Praise her but for this her without-door form,— Which, on my faith, deserves high speech,—and straight The shrug, the hum or ha,—these petty brands That calumny doth use:—O, I am out, That mercy does; for calumny will sear Virtue itself:—these shrugs, these hum’s, and ha’s, When you have said ’she’s goodly,’ come between, Ere you can say ’she’s honest’: but be it known, From him that has most…
    William Shakespeare  --  The Winter’s Tale
  • No, by oblique glances and whispered calumny.
    Boris Pasternak  --  Doctor Zhivago
  • Tell me who is spreading such calumnies about my good-daughter!
    George R.R. Martin  --  A Feast For Crows
  • Wilt thou ever be a foul-mouth’d and calumnious knave?
    William Shakespeare  --  All’s Well That Ends Well
  • SIR P: Sir, calumnies are answer’d best with silence.
    Ben Jonson  --  Volpone
  • Given the calumny New York previously had shoveled on Chicago, the postponement was an act of surprising grace.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Mere calumnies.
    George R.R. Martin  --  A Dance With Dragons
  • Vile calumny.
    George R.R. Martin  --  A Storm of Swords
  • Alas one is in the grave, torn to pieces by calumnies and bullets; another is now before you, still battling with calumnies and bullets—
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  The Idiot
  • I may here be met by an objection derived from electioneering intrigues, the meannesses of candidates, and the calumnies of their opponents.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 2
  • From the beginning of my career I knew that I should win in the long run by sheer weight of public opinion, in spite of the long campaign of misrepresentation and calumny against me.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Man And Superman
  • Yet we know by happy experience that the public trust was not betrayed; nor has the purity of our public councils in this particular ever suffered, even from the whispers of calumny.
    Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, & John Jay  --  The Federalist Papers
  • "I will na believe such calumny of the leddies, nor sic’ a reproach on my own skill," returned the Quartermaster, growing more and more Scotch as he warmed with his feelings; "it’s a conspiracy to rob a meritorious man of his dues."
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Pathfinder
  • This inquisition has led to my having many enemies of the worst and most dangerous kind, and has given occasion also to many calumnies.
    Plato  --  The Apology
  • "Hush, March; do not calumniate a daughter over her mother’s grave!
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Deerslayer
  • Perhaps, if I don’t look inside, I shall be lacking in delicacy towards Odette, since in this way alone I can rid myself of a suspicion which is, perhaps, a calumny on her, which must, in any case, cause her suffering, and which can never possibly be set at rest, once the letter is posted."
    Marcel Proust  --  Swann’s Way
  • Who has told such calumnies?
    William Makepeace Thackeray  --  Vanity Fair
  • ] I humbly thank your Highness; And am right glad to catch this good occasion Most throughly to be winnowed, where my chaff And corn shall fly asunder; for, I know, There’s none stands under more calumnious tongues Than I myself, poor man.
    William Shakespeare  --  Henry VIII
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