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  • adulterate the sample
  • As no one makes any profit by the sale, there is no longer any stimulus to extravagance, and no misrepresentation; no cheating, no adulteration or imitation, no bribery or ’grafting.’
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • I don’t like my crème brûlée adulterated, because then you can’t taste through to the quality of the ingredients.
    Malcolm Gladwell  --  Blink
  • When the children were not well at home, Teta Elzbieta would gather herbs and cure them; now she was obliged to go to the drugstore and buy extracts—and how was she to know that they were all adulterated?
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle

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  • The old man thereupon led me off to Churchill’s only beer parlor ( a place I would normally have avoided) and introduced me to wolf-juice: a mixture which consisted of something called Moose Brand Beer liberally adulterated with antifreeze alcohol obtained from the soldiers at the Air Base.
    Farley Mowat  --  Never Cry Wolf
  • Even Mary Burns, who no doubt taught her daughters the value of family, found that they honored her training of them by keeping to themselves, as if her involvement would be an adulteration.
    Chang-rae Lee  --  A Gesture Life
  • And Mrs. Lynde says you can never be sure of getting good baking powder nowadays when everything is so adulterated.
    Lucy Maud Montgomery  --  Anne Of Green Gables
  • If the car hadn’t been adulterated for the mysterious and missing goats, it would hold thirty-two horses.
    Sara Gruen  --  Water for Elephants
  • It is my girlfriends here in Joburg that have taught me how to give parties, keep a close eye on the help, and just overall make the graceful transition to wifehood and adulteration.
    Barbara Kingsolver  --  The Poisonwood Bible
  • Ay, that incestuous, that adulterate beast, With witchcraft of his wit, with traitorous gifts,— O wicked wit and gifts, that have the power So to seduce!
    William Shakespeare  --  Hamlet, Prince of Denmark

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  • I suppose one reason why we are seldom able to comfort our neighbours with our words is that our goodwill gets adulterated, in spite of ourselves, before it can pass our lips.
    George Eliot  --  Silas Marner
  • And on all of them that want to adulterate the pure white blood of the South.
    Tennessee Williams  --  A Streetcar Named Desire
  • Fauji cement was reputed to be reasonable and not too adulterated with additives to crumble in Himalayan weather.
    Greg Mortenson & David Oliver Relin  --  Three Cups of Tea
  • Mr. Spenlow being a little drowsy after the champagne — honour to the soil that grew the grape, to the grape that made the wine, to the sun that ripened it, and to the merchant who adulterated it!
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • Crome, I thought, looked at him with a tinge of dislike adulterating the usual calm superiority.
    Agatha Christie  --  The ABC Murders
  • Always, it would have to be complicated—adulterated—by his unwanted fame as one of the flagraisers.
    James Bradley  --  Flags of Our Fathers
  • Perhaps he could not tell his greatness from ungreat-ness and so mixed them together that what was adulterated was lost.
    Robert Penn Warren  --  All the King’s Men
  • Cuba had food rationing and allotments of coffee adulterated with ground peas, but no starvation, no enforced malnutrition.
    Tracy Kidder  --  Mountains Beyond Mountains
  • Before sunset, other considerations adulterated them, and the sense of guilt (so strangely connected with our first sight of any suffering) had begun to wear away.
    E.M. Forster  --  A Passage to India
  • No sooner had he fallen, than each pulled things to himself; the spirit of combat succeeded to the spirit of organization, bitterness to cordiality, hatred of one another to the benevolence of the founder towards all; the threads which M. Madeleine had set were tangled and broken, the methods were adulterated, the products were debased, confidence was killed; the market diminished, for lack of orders; salaries were reduced, the workshops stood still, bankruptcy arrived.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • I am possess’d with an adulterate blot; My blood is mingled with the crime of lust: For if we two be one, and thou play false, I do digest the poison of thy flesh, Being strumpeted by thy contagion.
    William Shakespeare  --  The Comedy of Errors
  • The collapse which Bloom ascribed to gastric inanition and certain chemical compounds of varying degrees of adulteration and alcoholic strength, accelerated by mental exertion and the velocity of rapid circular motion in a relaxing atmosphere, Stephen attributed to the reapparition of a matutinal cloud (perceived by both from two different points of observation Sandycove and Dublin) at first no bigger than a woman’s hand.
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • I remember going to him at about that time and asking him what the D.S.O. was, and he grunted out: "It’s a sort of a thing they give grocers who’ve honourably supplied the troops with adulterated coffee in war-time"—something of that sort.
    Ford Madox Ford  --  The Good Soldier
  • The story in Justice concluded by saying that Lorenzo Daza did not leave San Juan de la Cienaga at the end of the last century in search of better opportunities for his daughter’s future, as he liked to say, but because he had been found out in his prosperous business of adulterating imported tobacco with shredded paper, which he did with so much skill that not even the most sophisticated smokers noticed the deception.
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez  --  Love in the Time of Cholera
  • It may be as Your Grace suggests, though in most cases adulterating a poison only lessens its potency.
    George R.R. Martin  --  A Feast For Crows
  • We seek our friend not sacredly but with an adulterate passion which would appropriate him to ourselves.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • Yet how painful to be recalled, to be mitigated, to have one’s self adulterated, mixed up, become part of another.
    Virginia Woolf  --  The Waves
  • I do not adulterate the product with aphrodisiacs nor dilute it with romance and water; for I am merely executing your commission, not producing a popular play for the market.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Man And Superman
  • /To deacon/, a verb of decent mien in colonial days, signifying to read a hymn line by line, responded to the rough humor of the time, and began to mean to swindle or adulterate, /e. g./, to put the largest berries at the top of the box, to extend one’s fences /sub rosa/, or to mix sand with sugar.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • She also stumbled, with a large balance of success against her failures, through various philanthropic recommendations to Try our Mixture, Try our Family Black, Try our Orange-flavoured Pekoe, challenging competition at the head of Flowery Teas; and various cautions to the public against spurious establishments and adulterated articles.
    Charles Dickens  --  Little Dorrit
  • Thy Edward he is dead, that kill’d my Edward; The other Edward dead to quit my Edward; Young York he is but boot, because both they Match not the high perfection of my loss: Thy Clarence he is dead that stabb’d my Edward; And the beholders of this frantic play, The adulterate Hastings, Rivers, Vaughan, Grey, Untimely smother’d in their dusky graves.
    William Shakespeare  --  The Life and Death of King Richard III
  • Ah—that public-house experience accounts for your knowing about the adulteration of the ale when we went and had some that Sunday evening.
    Thomas Hardy  --  Jude the Obscure
  • He was in the same plight as the manufacturer who has to adulterate and misrepresent his product.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • Of course, imitation and adulteration are the essence of competition—they are but another form of the phrase ’to buy in the cheapest market and sell in the dearest.’
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • On one side of the room were the hoppers, into which men shoveled loads of meat and wheelbarrows full of spices; in these great bowls were whirling knives that made two thousand revolutions a minute, and when the meat was ground fine and adulterated with potato flour, and well mixed with water, it was forced to the stuffing machines on the other side of the room.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • Consider all the waste incidental to the manufacture of cheap qualities of goods, of goods made to sell and deceive the ignorant; consider the wastes of adulteration,—the shoddy clothing, the cotton blankets, the unstable tenements, the ground-cork life-preservers, the adulterated milk, the aniline soda water, the potato-flour sausages—
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • Consider all the waste incidental to the manufacture of cheap qualities of goods, of goods made to sell and deceive the ignorant; consider the wastes of adulteration,—the shoddy clothing, the cotton blankets, the unstable tenements, the ground-cork life-preservers, the adulterated milk, the aniline soda water, the potato-flour sausages—
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • A government official has stated that the nation suffers a loss of a billion and a quarter dollars a year through adulterated foods; which means, of course, not only materials wasted that might have been useful outside of the human stomach, but doctors and nurses for people who would otherwise have been well, and undertakers for the whole human race ten or twenty years before the proper time.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • …and the same with any other man or woman who had a means of getting "graft," and was willing to pay over a share of it: the green-goods man and the highwayman, the pickpocket and the sneak thief, and the receiver of stolen goods, the seller of adulterated milk, of stale fruit and diseased meat, the proprietor of unsanitary tenements, the fake doctor and the usurer, the beggar and the "pushcart man," the prize fighter and the professional slugger, the race-track "tout," the procurer,…
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • "Adulterated—I can’t touch it!"
    Thomas Hardy  --  Jude the Obscure
  • At the wave of the statue’s hand the great chords roll out again but this time Mozart’s music gets grotesquely adulterated with Gounod’s.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Man And Superman
  • The aristocracy he defended, in spite of the political marriages by which it tried to secure breeding for itself, had its mind undertrained by silly schoolmasters and governesses, its character corrupted by gratuitous luxury, its self-respect adulterated to complete spuriousness by flattery and flunkeyism.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Man And Superman
  • If I might take the liberty of saying so, sir, I don’t think the milk which is boiled with it is quite genuine; but I am aware, sir, that there is a great adulteration of milk, in London, and that the article in a pure state is difficult to be obtained.’
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • …lump sugar, two onions, one, the larger, Spanish, entire, the other, smaller, Irish, bisected with augmented surface and more redolent, a jar of Irish Model Dairy’s cream, a jug of brown crockery containing a naggin and a quarter of soured adulterated milk, converted by heat into water, acidulous serum and semisolidified curds, which added to the quantity subtracted for Mr Bloom’s and Mrs Fleming’s breakfasts, made one imperial pint, the total quantity originally delivered, two cloves,…
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • On one point he may fairly claim approval at this particular stage of his career: he did not mean to imitate those philanthropic models who make a profit out of poisonous pickles to support themselves while they are exposing adulteration, or hold shares in a gambling-hell that they may have leisure to represent the cause of public morality.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
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