To better see all uses of the word
The House of Mirth
please enable javascript.

Used In
The House of Mirth
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary

as in: the binding is loose Define
something that holds things together, or wraps or covers or ties something
  • It was so pleasant to sit there looking up at her, as she lifted now one book and then another from the shelves, fluttering the pages between her fingers, while her drooping profile was outlined against the warm background of old bindings, that he talked on without pausing to wonder at her sudden interest in so unsuggestive a subject.

  • There are no more uses of "binding" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

    Show samples from other sources
  • The library buys books with a durable binding or rebinds them to make them stronger.
  • The book’s binding is coming loose.

  • Go to more samples

unspecified meaning
  • She had on a hat and walking-dress, and the dogs were bounding at her feet.
  • They appeared, therefore, punctual and resigned, with the air of people bound for a dull "At Home," and after them Hilda and Muriel straggled, yawning and pinning each other’s veils and ribbons as they came.

  • Show more
  • And I’m bound to say Lily DOES distract it: I believe he’d marry her tomorrow if he found out there was anything wrong with Bertha.
  • "You’d better go back to binding edges," she said drily.
  • Mrs. Hatch and her friends seemed to float together outside the bounds of time and space.
  • Bound to happen to a good-looking girl with stingy relatives, I suppose; anyhow, they DID happen, and she found the ground prepared for her.
  • And it was not, after the first moment, the horror of the idea that held her spell-bound, subdued to his will; it was rather its subtle affinity to her own inmost cravings.
  • Carry Fisher, on the strength, as she frankly owned, of the Brys’ Newport success, had taken for the autumn months a small house at Tuxedo; and thither Lily was bound on the Sunday after Dorset’s visit.
  • …with extravagant tastes and no money had better marry the first rich man she could get; but with the subject of discussion at his side, turning to him for sympathy, making him feel that he understood her better than her dearest friends, and confirming the assurance by the appeal of her exquisite nearness, he was ready to swear that such a marriage was a desecration, and that, as a man of honour, he was bound to do all he could to protect her from the results of her disinterestedness.
  • To Gerty herself it would once have seemed impossible that she should ever again talk freely with him of Lily Bart; but what had passed in the secrecy of her own breast seemed to resolve itself, when the mist of the struggle cleared, into a breaking down of the bounds of self, a deflecting of the wasted personal emotion into the general current of human understanding.

  • Show more again
  • "Not in the least, though I’m bound to say there are not many married people in it.
  • You don’t want to keep me bound fast in hell, do you?

  • There are no more uses of "bound" in the book.

To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: south-bound lanes Define
travelling in a particular direction or to a specific location
as in: She's bound to succeed. Define
almost certain to; or determined to
as in: bound together Define
held together (connected or united) or wrapped (see word notes for a more detailed definition based upon context)
as in: I can't/must. I'm bound by... Define
tied up, prevented, or required
as in: the binding is loose Define
something that holds things together, or wraps or covers or ties something
as in: It put me in a bind. Define
a difficult situation
as in: out of bounds; bounded on the east Define
a boundary or limit
as in: The deer bound across the trail. Define
to leap or jump
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading