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badger
in
Harry Potter (#7) and the Deathly Hallows
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badger
Used In
Harry Potter (#7) and the Deathly Hallows
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as in: badgered her until she agreed Define
annoy and/or persuade persistently
  • "Generations of students have badgered me — " "This isn’t about trying to get better marks!"
  • "No, I just felt anger — I couldn’t tell — " Harry felt badgered, confused, and Hermione did not help as she said in a frightened voice, "Your scar, again?

  • There are no more uses of "badger" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • Stop badgering me. I gave you my answer and I’m not going to change it.
  • It’s not helpful if you belittle and badger her until she is too defensive to rationally discuss the issue.

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unspecified meaning
  • Harry saw the gold Gryffindor lion, emblazoned on scarlet; the black badger of Hufflepuff, set against yellow; and the bronze eagle of Ravenclaw, on blue.
  • "Remember, the cup’s small and gold, it’s got a badger engraved on it, two handles — otherwise see if you can spot Ravenclaw’s symbol anywhere, the eagle — " They directed their wands into every nook and crevice, turning cautiously on the spot.

  • There are no more uses of "badger" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: badgered her until she agreed Define
annoy and/or persuade persistently
as in: saw a badger Define
burrowing mammal with strong claws widely distributed in the northern hemisphere
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