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The House of Mirth
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The House of Mirth
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  • She had so long been accustomed to pass from one country-house to another, till the close of the holidays brought her friends to town, that the unfilled gaps of time confronting her produced a sharp sense of waning popularity.
  • It seemed to her that she was again descending the staircase from Selden’s rooms; and looking down to remonstrate with the dispenser of the soapy flood, she found herself met by a lifted stare which had once before confronted her under similar circumstances.
  • She flung on her dressing-gown to answer the summons, and unlocking her door, confronted the shining vision of Lily Bart.
  • She leaned back, sighing, in the morning abandon of lace and muslin, turning an indifferent shoulder to the heaped-up importunities of her desk, while she considered, with the eye of a physician who has given up the case, the erect exterior of the patient confronting her.
  • The morrow, rising on an apparent continuance of the same conditions, revealed nothing of what had occurred between the confronted pair.
  • She had never learned to live with her own thoughts, and to be confronted with them through such hours of lucid misery made the confused wretchedness of her previous vigil seem easily bearable.
  • She continued to confront him with the same air of ironic composure.
  • Having reached the station early, he had arrived at this point in his reflections before the increasing throng on the platform warned him that he could not hope to preserve his privacy; the next moment there was a hand on the door, and he turned to confront the very face he was fleeing.
  • In the mysterious nocturnal separation from all outward signs of life, she felt herself more strangely confronted with her fate.
  • Once confronted with it, however, she went the full length of its consequences; and these had never been more clearly present to her than when, the next afternoon, she set out for a walk with Rosedale.
  • To give up her apartment, and shrink to the obscurity of a boarding-house, or the provisional hospitality of a bed in Gerty Farish’s sitting-room, was an expedient which could only postpone the problem confronting her; and it seemed wiser as well as more agreeable to remain where she was and find some means of earning her living.

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  • You must confront your problems.
  • You must confront your opponent.

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