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odious
in
The House of Mirth
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odious
Used In
The House of Mirth
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  • Could one never do the simplest, the most harmless thing, without subjecting one’s self to some odious conjecture?
  • But the odious things were there, and remained with her.
  • She had no tolerance for scenes which were not of her own making, and it was odious to her that her husband should make a show of himself before the servants.
  • The name, made more odious by its diminutive, obtruded itself on Lily’s thoughts like a leer.
  • "It is only because I am tired and have such odious things to think about," she kept repeating; and it seemed an added injustice that petty cares should leave a trace on the beauty which was her only defence against them.
  • She was in an odious mood when she came here, but Lawrence’s turning up put her in a good humour, and if you’d only let her think he came for HER it would have never occurred to her to play you this trick.
  • "Please let us drop the subject, Carry: it’s too odious to me."
  • You stupid dear, why do you say such odious things to me?
  • She could not have remained in New York without repaying the money she owed to Trenor; to acquit herself of that odious debt she might even have faced a marriage with Rosedale; but the accident of placing the Atlantic between herself and her obligations made them dwindle out of sight as if they had been milestones and she had travelled past them.

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  • Though they think the country’s government is odious, they’re unwilling to help topple it for fear of the consequences.
  • The sight of me is odious in their eyes;
    Shakespeare, William  --  King Henry VI, Part 2

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