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The House of Mirth
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The House of Mirth
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  • The faint disdain of her smile seemed to lift her high above her antagonist’s reach,
  • She returned his profound bow with a slight nod, made more disdainful by the sense of Selden’s surprise that she should number Rosedale among her acquaintances.
  • Neither one of the couple cared for money, but their disdain of it took the form of always spending a little more than was prudent.
  • She had never even tried to please him—he had been drawn to her in spite of her manifest disdain.
  • "Don’t let us speak of it: I was very sorry for you," she said, with a tinge of disdain which, as she instantly perceived, was not lost on him.
  • Lily drew away with a movement of quick disdain: it was easier to endure his insolence than his commiseration.
  • It was her exquisite inaccessibleness, the sense of distance she could convey without a hint of disdain, that made it most difficult for him to give her up.
  • Her enjoyment of her surroundings was, indeed, tinged by the unpleasant consideration that she was accepting the hospitality and courting the approval of people she had disdained under other conditions.
  • Mrs. Peniston’s genuine incredulity enabled her to dismiss Miss Stepney with a disdain which boded ill for that lady’s prospect of succeeding to the black brocade; but minds impenetrable to reason have generally some crack through which suspicion filters, and her visitor’s insinuations did not glide off as easily as she had expected.
  • He had figured once or twice at the Trenor dinners, and had learned to speak with just the right note of disdain of the big Van Osburgh crushes; and all he now needed was a wife whose affiliations would shorten the last tedious steps of his ascent.
  • The Dorsets, the Stepneys, the Brys—all the actors and witnesses in the miserable drama—had preceded her with their version of the case; and, even had she seen the least chance of gaining a hearing for her own, some obscure disdain and reluctance would have restrained her.
  • In Miss Bart’s world the Horse Show, and the public it attracted, had ostensibly come to be classed among the spectacles disdained of the elect; but, as the feudal lord might sally forth to join in the dance on his village green, so society, unofficially and incidentally, still condescended to look in upon the scene.

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  • She tries to be polite, but cannot hide her disdain for authority.
  • She has nothing but disdain for the notion that common people can regulate their own lives better than she can.

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