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badger
in
Harry Potter (#4) and the Goblet of Fire
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badger
Used In
Harry Potter (#4) and the Goblet of Fire
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as in: badgered her until she agreed Define
annoy and/or persuade persistently
  • She had been badgering Harry and Ron ever since, first to wear the badges, then to persuade others to do the same, and she had also taken to rattling around the Gryffindor common room every evening, cornering people and shaking the collecting tin under their noses.

  • There are no more uses of "badger" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • Stop badgering me. I gave you my answer and I’m not going to change it.
  • It’s not helpful if you belittle and badger her until she is too defensive to rationally discuss the issue.

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unspecified meaning
  • Behind the teachers’ table, the largest banner of all bore the Hogwarts coat of arms: lion, eagle, badger, and snake united around a large letter H. Harry, Ron, and Hermione sat down beside Fred and George at the Gryffindor table.
  • Enormous silk banners hung from the walls, each of them representing a Hogwarts House: red with a gold lion for Gryffiindor, blue with a bronze eagle for Ravenclaw, yellow with a black badger for Hufflepuff, and green with a silver serpent for Slytherin.

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  • He had merely requested that they leave Harry alone, that nobody ask him questions or badger him to tell the story of what had happened in the maze.

  • There are no more uses of "badger" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: badgered her until she agreed Define
annoy and/or persuade persistently
as in: saw a badger Define
burrowing mammal with strong claws widely distributed in the northern hemisphere
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