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Gone with the Wind
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Gone with the Wind
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  • It’s going hungry, and getting the measles and pneumonia from sleeping in the wet.
  • And if it ain’t measles and pneumonia, it’s your bowels.
  • He had died ignominiously and swiftly of pneumonia, following measles, without ever having gotten any closer to the Yankees than the camp in South Carolina.
  • Food was scanty, one blanket for three men, and the ravages of smallpox, pneumonia and typhoid gave the place the name of a pest-house.
  • Was he delirious with pneumonia and no blanket to cover him?
  • Moreover, many of them were dying, dying swiftly, silently, having little strength left to combat the blood poisoning, gangrene, typhoid and pneumonia which had set in before they could reach Atlanta and a doctor.
  • And a plenty of the folks died of pneumonia and not being able to stand that sort of treatment.
  • Will was acutely ill with pneumonia and when the girls put him to bed, they feared he would soon join the boy in the burying ground.
  • Emaciated from a year in a Yankee prison, exhausted by his long tramp on his ill-fitting wooden peg, he had little strength to combat pneumonia and for days he lay in the bed moaning, trying to get up, fighting battles over again.
  • In the first year of the war, Frank had spent two months in the hospital with pneumonia and he had lived in dread of another attack since that time, so he was only too glad to lie sweating under three blankets and drink the hot concoctions Mammy and Aunt Pitty brought him every hour.

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  • A mild case of pneumonia is sometimes referred to as "walking pneumonia."
  • I thought probably I’d get pneumonia and die.
    J.D. Salinger  --  The Catcher in the Rye

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