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blockade
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Gone with the Wind
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blockade
Used In
Gone with the Wind
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  • The Yankee blockade about the Confederate ports had tightened, and luxuries such as tea, coffee, silks, whalebone stays, colognes, fashion magazines and books were scarce and dear.
  • Blockading is a business with me and I’m making money out of it.
  • When praised for his services to the Confederacy, he unfailingly replied that blockading was a business with him.
  • I give myself about six months more of blockading and then I’m through.
  • He had sold his boats when blockading grew too hazardous, and he was now openly engaged in food speculation.
  • No’m, dem air ain’ sto’s, dey’s blockade awfisses.
  • Law, Miss Scarlett, doan you know whut blockade awfisses is?
  • I wish to goodness that blockade runner—what’s his name?
  • Why, you—you must be the famous Captain Butler we’ve been hearing so much about—the blockade runner.
  • And I’m sure I’ll clean up a million on the blockade.
  • "He seemed a perfect gentleman and when you think how brave he’s been, running the blockade—"
  • We are fighting the Yankees’ new rifles with Revolutionary War muskets, and soon the blockade will be too tight for even medical supplies to slip in.
  • They were as isolated from the world of fashion as shipwrecked mariners, for few books of fashion came through the blockade.
  • She knew that he was acting the part of the dashing and patriotic blockade runner simply because it amused him.
  • There are enough stupid patriots who are risking every cent they have in the blockade and who are going to come out of this war paupers.
  • It was a beautiful piece of material, thick and warm and with a dull sheen to it, undoubtedly blockade goods and undoubtedly very expensive.
  • The Yankee gunboats had tightened the mesh at the ports and very few ships were now able to slip past the blockade.
  • Even the blockade had added to Atlanta’s prestige.
  • They landed their cargoes at Wilmington or Charleston, where they were met by swarms of merchants and speculators from all over the South who assembled to buy blockaded goods at auction.
  • But now the Confederate ports were stoppered with Yankee gunboats, only a trickle of blockade-run goods was slipping in from Europe, and the South was desperately trying to manufacture her own war materials.
  • Everyone knew now that the fate of the Confederacy rested as much upon the skill of the blockade boats in eluding the Yankee fleet as it did upon the soldiers at the front.
  • Conditions in Wilmington, the chief blockade port, now that Charleston’s port was practically sealed by the Yankee gunboats, had reached the proportions of an open scandal.
  • Besides, the dashing blockade runners were bringing in these very things under the Yankees’ disgruntled noses, and that made the possession of them many times more thrilling.
  • It was said that he was at the head of a combine worth more than a million dollars, with Wilmington as its headquarters for the purpose of buying blockade goods on the docks.
  • As for instance, right after Fort Sumter fell and before the blockade was established, I bought up several thousand bales of cotton at dirt-cheap prices and ran them to England.
  • Blockade gold.
  • For some months, he was the most popular and romantic figure the town knew, despite his previous reputation, despite the faint rumors that he was engaged not only in blockading but in speculating on foodstuffs, too.
  • At the onset of the war, he had emerged from obscurity with enough money to buy a small swift boat and now, when blockaded goods realized two thousand per cent on each cargo, he owned four boats.
  • Already the foundries were beginning to feel the lack of iron, for little or none came through the blockade, and the mines in Alabama were standing almost idle while the miners were at the front.
  • Laces and silks and braid and ribbons, all blockade run, all the more precious and more proudly worn because of it, finery flaunted with an added pride as an extra affront to the Yankees.
  • And she could see people and many lights and hear music and view for herself the lovely laces and frocks and frills that the famous Captain Butler had run through the blockade on his last trip.
  • When well-meaning people complimented him on his bravery in running the blockade, he blandly replied that he was always frightened when in danger, as frightened as were the brave boys at the front.
  • Moreover, he usually brought her some little gift from Nassau which he assured her he had purchased especially for her and blockaded in at risk of his life— papers of pins and needles, buttons, spools of silk thread and hairpins.
  • With the blockade closing tighter and tighter, there was no way to get the South’s money crop to its market in England, no way to bring in the necessaries which cotton money had brought in years gone by.
  • We must have more money to buy medical supplies from England, and we have with us tonight the intrepid captain who has so successfully run the blockade for a year and who will run it again to bring us the drugs we need.
  • It was showered and flounced with cream-colored Chantilly lace that had come from Charleston on the last blockader, and Maybelle was flaunting it as saucily as if she and not the famous Captain Butler had run the blockade.
  • There were parties and balls and bazaars every week and war weddings without number, with the grooms on furlough in bright gray and gold braid and the brides in blockade-run finery, aisles of crossed swords, toasts drunk in blockaded champagne and tearful farewells.
  • Rhett had brought her that linen and lace from Nassau on the last boat he slipped through the blockade and she had worked a week to make the garment.
  • But of course, he made his money out of the blockade
  • There came to her, from the recesses of her mind, words Rhett had spoken in the early years of the war about the money he made in the blockade.
  • It came from Confederate cotton which I managed to run through the blockade and sell in Liverpool at sky-high prices.
  • You remember when the blockade tightened, I couldn’t get a boat out of any Confederate port or into one, so there the money stayed in England.
  • Was it my fault that the blockade got too tight?
  • There just wasn’t any money m the treasury when the war was over and everybody thinks some of the blockade runners got it and are keeping quiet about it.
  • In Atlanta, there were machine factories tediously turning out machinery to manufacture war materials—tediously, because there were few machines in the South from which they could model and nearly every wheel and cog had to be made from drawings that came through the blockade from England.
  • There were strange faces on the streets of Atlanta now, and citizens who a year ago would have pricked up their ears at the sound of even a Western accent paid no heed to the foreign tongues of Europeans who had run the blockade to build machines and turn out Confederate munitions.
  • There were parties and balls and bazaars every week and war weddings without number, with the grooms on furlough in bright gray and gold braid and the brides in blockade-run finery, aisles of crossed swords, toasts drunk in blockaded champagne and tearful farewells.
  • If he could make as much money out of government contracts, he would say, picking out with his eyes those who had government contracts, then he would certainly abandon the hazards of blockading and take to selling shoddy cloth, sanded sugar, spoiled flour and rotten leather to the Confederacy.
  • And all during the war when I was blockading out of Charleston, Mother had to lie and slip off to see me.
  • If Jeff Davis had commandeered all the cotton and gotten it to England before the blockade tightened—
  • That day Rhett had met an ex-blockade runner and they had had much to say to each other.
  • Well, when the blockade got too tight, he couldn’t bring in the guns and he couldn’t have spent one one-hundredth of the cotton money on them anyway, so there were simply millions of dollars in English banks put there by Captain Butler and other blockaders, waiting till the blockade loosened.
  • Well, when the blockade got too tight, he couldn’t bring in the guns and he couldn’t have spent one one-hundredth of the cotton money on them anyway, so there were simply millions of dollars in English banks put there by Captain Butler and other blockaders, waiting till the blockade loosened.
  • Sometimes when Rhett was alone with them and Scarlett in the next room, she heard laughter and caught fragments of conversation that meant nothing to her, scraps of words, puzzling names—Cuba and Nassau in the blockade days, the gold rush and claim jumping, gun running and filibustering, Nicaragua and William Walker and how he died against a wall at Truxillo.
  • "There are many brave and patriotic men in the blockade arm of the Confederacy’s naval service," ran the last of the doctor’s letter, "unselfish men who are risking their lives and all their wealth that the Confederacy may survive.
  • There was never any knowing when he would remark affably, over a punch cup: "Ralph, if I’d had any sense I’d have made my money selling gold-mine stocks to widows and orphans, like you, instead of blockading.

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  • They could not get past the naval blockade.

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