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used in
Gone with the Wind
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Used in
Gone with the Wind
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  • To her, it meant groans, delirium, death and smells.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Was he delirious with pneumonia and no blanket to cover him?  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Certainly the language he used in his delirium was no less grammatical than that of the Tarleton twins.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Sometimes they believed they must still be delirious and these things had not happened at all.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Rhett looked down at her as if he thought her delirious but Scarlett understood and was irritated.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • You see, she's delirious" or "You mustn't give up hope, Captain Butler.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He had the sallow malarial face of the south Georgia Cracker, pale pinkish hair and washed-out blue eyes which even in delirium were patient and mild.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She began calling for Ashley, over and over, as if in a delirium until the hideous monotony gave Scarlett a fierce desire to smother her voice with a pillow.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • There was endless cooking and lifting and turning and fanning, endless hours of washing and rerolling bandages and picking lint, and endless warm nights made sleepless by the babbling delirium of men in the next room.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • It was only that he was drunk and sick from strain and his mind was running wild, like a man delirious, babbling wild fantasies.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • But Dr. Meade was there after all, he had come, even if the soldiers at the depot did need him for she heard him say: "Delirious.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: fever induced delirium
as in: delirius with joy
To see an overview of word senses, click here.

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