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Gone with the Wind
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Gone with the Wind
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  • "He isn’t brave," said Scarlett perversely, pouring half a pitcher of syrup over her waffles.
  • He had almost seemed like a human being and not the perverse wretch she knew so well.
  • What a perverse wretch he was, but how nice he could be at times!
  • It was odd that he of all people should appear in this light, for he was as unstable as quicksilver and as perverse as a demon fresh from the pit.
  • Instead, it seemed as though, after trying the company of the staid and patriotic citizens and winning their respect and grudging liking, something perverse in him made him go out of his way to affront them and show them that his conduct had been only a masquerade and one which no longer amused him.
  • Like monkeys or small children turned loose among treasured objects whose value is beyond their comprehension, they ran wild—either from perverse pleasure in destruction or simply because of their ignorance.
  • Why had the other men who were both smart and honest been so perverse about working for her?
  • How perverse of Rhett to say that it had done nothing for her!
  • How perverse of him to evade the issue so neatly, as if not caring whether children came had anything to do with their actual arrival.
  • Rhett was just being perverse in the matter, making her appear a poor mother, just to pay her back for banishing him from her room.
  • Why did such perverse things give him such pleasure?
  • He was polite and disinterested and she missed his interest, perverse though it had been, missed the old days of bickering and retort.

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  • She took perverse satisfaction in spoiling his plans.
  • a perverse mood

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