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Gone with the Wind
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Gone with the Wind
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  • She only felt a furious surge of indignation that he should think her such a fool.
  • "Not going to be any war!" cried the twins indignantly, as though they had been defrauded.
  • Brent’s wide ingenuous face was puzzled and mildly indignant.
  • "Well, at any rate I’ve never been thrown," cried Scarlett indignantly.
  • The twins looked at the determined black boy in perplexity and indignation.
  • Mammy’s lips were large and pendulous and, when indignant, she could push out her lower one to twice its normal length.
  • "Why, he means the boys are a passel of fools!" thought Scarlett indignantly, the hot blood coming to her cheeks.
  • As she thought this, the clamor of dissenting voices rose up about Ashley, indignant, fiery.
  • " ’Wouldn’t let!’ " she cried indignantly.
  • "Honey or India?" questioned Melly excitedly, while Scarlett stared almost indignantly.
  • As she looked indignantly at the empty purse, an idea took form in Scarlett’s mind and grew swiftly.
  • "Sir," said Mrs. Meade indignantly.
  • Toby, who had handled Gerald’s horses for twenty years, pushed out his lips in mute indignation at being told how to conduct his own business.
  • "Ah gwine fix yo’ supper mahseff an’ you eats it," said Mammy, her brow furrowed with indignation as she started down the hall for the kitchen.
  • At this defiant heresy, Mammy’s brow lowered with indignation.
  • "God’s nightgown!" said Scarlett to herself in indignation, using Gerald’s favorite oath.
  • Indignation at being misunderstood mingled with Scarlett’s forlorn feeling of being out of everything and strangled all utterance.
  • He bowed and sauntered off, leaving her with her bosom heaving with impotent rage and indignation.
  • Mrs. Elsing, Mrs. Merriwether and Mrs. Whiting were red with indignation.
  • Scarlett was furious with embarrassment and indignation.
  • Dr. Meade had begun to smile again, ignoring completely the indignant whispers that came from the Ladies’ Hospital Committee in the corner.
  • CHAPTER XI On an afternoon of the following week, Scarlett came home from the hospital weary and indignant.
  • "Oh," she began, indignant at the slight to her charms.
  • She was indignant that he had read her mind.
  • There was indignation in his hoarse bass voice but also a wheedling note, and Scarlett teasingly clicked her tongue against her teeth as she reached out to pull his cravat into place.
  • And, instead of turning her against him, it only made her more timidly gracious toward him because of her indignation at what she fancied was a gross injustice done him.
  • Dr. Meade, who had arrived out of breath, expecting to find Melanie in premature labor at least, judging by Aunt Pitty’s alarmed summoning, was indignant and said as much.
  • The doctor’s letter was the first of a chorus of indignation that was beginning to be heard all over the South against speculators, profiteers and holders of government contracts.
  • They were completely fearless of wild horses, shooting affrays and the indignation of their neighbors, but they had a wholesome fear of their red-haired mother’s outspoken remarks and the riding crop that she did not scruple to lay across their breeches.
  • Her indignant and hopeless reverie was broken when the crowd began pushing back against the walls, the ladies carefully holding their hoops so that no careless contact should turn them up against their bodies and show more pantalets than was proper.
  • And our boys so hungry and needing shoes and clothes and horses! A hasty note from Darcy Meade to the doctor, the only first-hand information Atlanta received during those first days of July, was passed from hand to hand, with mounting indignation.
  • Everyone laughed except Peter, who shifted from one large splayed foot to the other in mounting indignation.
  • He sank back against the seat aghast, indignation struggling with bewilderment.
  • Now he saw that she understood entirely too well and he felt the usual masculine indignation at the duplicity of women.
  • Words of moral indignation rose to her lips but suddenly she remembered the Yankee who lay under the tangle of scuppernong vines at Tara.
  • Scarlett looked into his smooth unreadable face in confusion and indignation.
  • His indignation was mounting, now that the initial hurt was subsiding.
  • Pork was amazed and indignant.
  • He saw the flame of indignant pride in them and he dropped his gaze quickly to his plate in embarrassment.
  • She felt as indignant as if her own money had been squandered.
  • You are just putting on this indignant front because you think it’s proper and respectable.
  • "If Carreen had any sense of gratitude to me for what I’ve done for her, she’d marry him and not let him get away from here," Scarlett thought indignantly.
  • Mammy was torn between indignation at the very idea of her two hundred pounds scooting anywhere, much less to the attic, and the dawning of a horrid suspicion.
  • There were wild squealings, indignant gruntings in the back yard and, running to the widow, Scarlett saw Mammy waddling hurriedly across the cotton field with a struggling young pig under each arm.
  • For a moment she was indignant that he should say other women were prettier, more clever and kind than she, but that momentary flare was wiped out in her pleasure that he had remembered her and her charm.
  • Scarlett had thrown herself on the bed and was sobbing at the top of her voice, sobbing for her lost youth and the pleasures of youth that were denied her, sobbing with the indignation and despair of a child who once could get anything she wanted by sobbing and now knows that sobbing can no longer help her.
  • thought Scarlett, indignantly.
  • "It’s not a carriage, it’s an old buggy," said Scarlett indignantly.
  • "Manager!" cried Scarlett indignantly.
  • Scarlett cried indignantly.
  • "Why, of course not," she replied indignantly.
  • "As though she thought I was to blame for what happened," Scarlett thought indignantly.
  • "Put him in the chair," cried Melanie indignantly.
  • Her stout bosom swelled indignantly as she remembered Scarlett’s rude reception of her advice on marrying Rhett.
  • "Do you mean to tell me," cried Scarlett indignantly, "that you don’t care—"
  • "Why, Ashley Wilkes!" she cried indignantly.
  • Her narrow shoulders were squared and her small jaw set indignantly and, for all her notice, she might have had no other guest but Scarlett.
  • There were indignation and disappointment in the sound.
  • Indignation was loud among the inhabitants of Atlanta and Decatur who were forced to use the road for travel between the two towns.
  • She wanted comforting, indignation, threats of vengeance.
  • Melanie’s soft voice, tinged with indignation, went on and on as she told of the recent outburst of temperament on the part of the Lady Harpists.
  • She wavered momentarily between interest in his last words and a feminine desire to prolong the scene with anger and indignation.
  • To her surprise and indignation he laughed at Mammy’s statement about mules in horse harness.
  • Indignation and despair had claimed her to the exclusion of all other thoughts.
  • Oh, spare me your moral indignation.
  • Even his own party was split, so great had public indignation become.
  • She gave him a shamed indignant look, but Will’s placid gaze bore her down.
  • Scarlett peeped slyly at Ashley and saw surprise and uncertainty plain in his face as he looked into Melanie’s dark indignant eyes.
  • "Indeed?" cried Scarlett, indignant both at the man’s rudeness and Melly’s meddling.
  • "I didn’t know you and Mr. Kennedy had business dealings," said Aunt Pittypat, almost indignant that some of Frank’s activities were unknown to her.
  • And now, though she tried to make herself hate him, tried to be indignant, she could not.
  • "Daddy!" said the small voice, indignant now, and Rhett, still laughing, went down the hall to his daughter.
  • And as Scarlett broke into renewed indignant commands: "Hush, you fool! Let her go! Why should anyone want to stay in this house—now?"
  • She could sense that in Melanie’s devoted heart she had an ally, feel Melanie’s indignation that anyone, even her beloved husband, should make Scarlett cry.
  • No respectable white woman and few negroes ever went outside their homes from the moment they first suspected they were with child, and Mrs. Merriwether declared indignantly that from the way Scarlett was acting she was likely to have the baby on the public streets.
  • Mrs. Merriwether, torn with indignation and insult, furious that she had to take this favor from a man she disliked and distrusted, was hardly gracious in her thanks.
  • The neighbors would have been shocked, aggrieved and indignant, had these brief prayers been all the service over the body of their loved friend, and no one knew this better than Ashley.
  • He stood silent before her, clutching the glove as though it were an understanding hand and, in the stillness that followed her words, her indignation fell away and pity, tinged with contempt, took its place.
  • She made Scarlett arrive early on these afternoons and remain until the last callers had gone, thereby depriving the ladies of the opportunity for enjoyable group discussion and speculation, a matter which caused some mild indignation.
  • Evidently a game of Indian had been in progress when the time came to meet the train and it was obvious from the look of quizzical helplessness on Rhett’s face and the lowering indignation of Mammy that Bonnie had refused to have her toilet remedied, even to meet her mother.
  • Of course he would hate her now—now that they had both been saved by the indignant squaring of Melanie’s thin shoulders and the love and outspoken trust which had been in her voice as she crossed the glassy floor to slip her arm through Scarlett’s and face the curious, malicious, covertly hostile crowd.
  • Mrs. Merriwether, I’ll be bound!" cried Mrs. Meade indignantly.
  • The mourners were seething with indignation and downcast with sorrow, especially three of them—old man McRae, who had been Gerald’s crony since he came to the up-country from Savannah so many years before, Grandma Fontaine who loved him because he was Ellen’s husband, and Mrs. Tarleton who had been closer to him than to any of her neighbors because, as she often said, he was the only man in the County who knew a stallion from a gelding.
  • "Not a word about me!" thought Scarlett indignantly, as Melly smiled in confusion and answered, "Dear me, no, Captain Butler!
  • Oh, why doesn’t he keep his mouth shut!" thought Scarlett indignantly.
  • When Scarlett was seeing Rhett to the door, she asked indignantly: "If it were you, wouldn’t you enlist with the Yankees to keep from dying in that place and then desert?
  • "Land is the only thing in the world that amounts to anything," he shouted, his thick, short arms making wide gestures of indignation, "for ’tis the only thing in this world that lasts, and don’t you be forgetting it!
  • I’m not saying anything," said Scarlett indignantly.
  • Ah wouldn’ let no sech trash sot me free," said Peter indignantly.
  • Don’t you dare go bothering Pa with any of our troubles!" cried Scarlett, distracted between indignation at her sister and fear for Gerald.
  • Just stand at your gate here and ask every darky woman who passes and I’m sure—" The three women broke into indignant outcries.
  • You tend to your business and I’ll tend to mine," she said indignantly.
  • Indeed they are not," cried Melanie indignantly, forgetting that Scarlett’s eyes were almost that shade.
  • It isn’t silly," said Mrs. Elsing indignantly.
  • Her heart was in her throat with fright at daring to address the indignant gathering and her voice shook but she kept crying: "Ladies!
  • To Mammy’s indignation, her preferred playmates were not her demure sisters or the well-brought-up Wilkes girls but the negro children on the plantation and the boys of the neighborhood, and she could climb a tree or throw a rock as well as any of them.
  • A damned mule," she repeated, looking indignantly at the scrawny beast.

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  • She was indignant, but agreed to be searched when they accused her of shoplifting.
  • "I am not a fool," she said indignantly.

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