To see all instances of the word
florid
used in
Gone with the Wind
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florid
Used in
Gone with the Wind
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  • His words brought up Gerald's florid face and bellowing voice so clearly.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She knew that his elaborate gallantries and his florid speeches were all done with his tongue in his cheek.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • As she had intended, Gerald was startled by the sound; then he recognized her, and a look both sheepish and defiant came over his florid face.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She looked into Gerald's putty-colored face and, for the first time in her life, she saw him unshaven, his once florid face covered with silvery bristles.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • In her face were too sharply blended the delicate features of her mother, a Coast aristocrat of French descent, and the heavy ones of her florid Irish father.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • When Gerald was forty-three, so thickset of body and florid of face that he looked like a hunting squire out of a sporting print, it came to him that Tara, dear though it was, and the County folk, with their open hearts and open houses, were not enough.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Mrs. Merriwether knew that so expensive a gift—and a gift of clothing at that—was highly improper, but she could think of no way of refusing when Rhett told her in the most florid language that nothing was too good to deck the bride of one of our brave heroes.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • 'Tis the Tarleton ladies," he announced to his daughters, his florid face abeam, for excepting Ellen there was no lady in the County he liked more than the red-haired Mrs. Tarleton.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: a florid style
as in: florid color
To see an overview of word senses (including some not listed above), click here.

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