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Gone with the Wind
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affront -- as in: an affront to society
Used In
Gone with the Wind
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  • He seemed to take pleasure not only in affronting the sincere and red-hot loyalties of Atlanta but in presenting himself in the worst possible light.
  • Laces and silks and braid and ribbons, all blockade run, all the more precious and more proudly worn because of it, finery flaunted with an added pride as an extra affront to the Yankees.
  • He not only affronted the town with insinuations of venality on the part of men in high places and slurs on the courage of the men in the field, but he took pleasure in tricking the dignified citizenry into embarrassing situations.
  • They aren’t successful and so they aren’t affronting the hot Southern pride of their men folks.
  • He always left her before they reached the town again but all Atlanta knew about their meetings, and it gave the gossips something new to add to the long list of Scarlett’s affronts to the proprieties.
  • Instead, it seemed as though, after trying the company of the staid and patriotic citizens and winning their respect and grudging liking, something perverse in him made him go out of his way to affront them and show them that his conduct had been only a masquerade and one which no longer amused him.
  • He was so affronted at a Butler becoming a gambler that when I came home for the first time, he forbade my mother to see me.
  • And he seemed to take it as a personal affront that I did not starve but put my poker playing to excellent advantage and supported myself royally by gambling.
  • He went his way, amused, contemptuous, impervious to the opinions of those about him, so courteous that his courtesy was an affront in itself.
  • Ashley knew that half the people present had never heard of Purgatory and those who had would take it as a personal affront, if he insinuated, even in prayer, that so fine a man as Mr. O’Hara had not gone straight to Heaven.

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  • She considered anything but the very best manners to be an affront to her dignity.
  • Words without deeds is an affront to the principle that guides our Nation and makes a mockery of the values we as public servants claim to love.
    Jon Corzine

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