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The Da Vinci Code
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The Da Vinci Code
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  • Because the hiding place of the Holy Grail includes a sarcophagus.
  • Can you imagine the four chests of Sangreal documents sitting right here with Mary Magdalene’s sarcophagus?
  • The sarcophagus was recessed in a niche, obscured from this oblique angle.
  • Sophie moved directly to the sarcophagus, but Langdon hung back a few feet, keeping an eye on the abbey around them.
  • A careless tourist had left a charcoal, grave-rubbing pencil on the sarcophagus lid near Newton’s foot.
  • Langdon reached out to pick it up, but as he leaned toward the sarcophagus, the light shifted on the polished black-marble slab, and Langdon froze.
  • Scrawled on the sarcophagus lid, at Newton’s feet, shimmered a barely visible charcoal-pencil message: I have Teabing.
  • Langdon had attempted to board it once, but the "viewing capsules" reminded him of sealed sarcophagi, and he opted to keep his feet on the ground and enjoy the view from the airy banks of the Thames.
  • From the fear in her touch Langdon sensed someone must be approaching, but when he turned to her, she was staring aghast at the top of the black marble sarcophagus.
  • Crossing the massive nave on a diagonal, Langdon and Sophie remained silent as the elaborate sepulchre revealed itself in tantalizing increments… a black-marble sarcophagus… a reclining statue of Newton… two winged boys… a huge pyramid… and… an enormous orb.
  • Newton’s tomb consisted of a massive black-marble sarcophagus on which reclined the sculpted form of Sir Isaac Newton, wearing classical costume, and leaning proudly against a stack of his own books—Divinity, Chronology, Opticks, and Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica.
  • He began with the clawed feet beneath the sarcophagus, moved upward past Newton, past his books on science, past the two boys with their mathematical scroll, up the face of the pyramid to the giant orb with its constellations, and finally up to the niche’s star-filled canopy.
  • Their tombs, packed into every last niche and alcove, range in grandeur from the most regal of mausoleums—that of Queen Elizabeth I, whose canopied sarcophagus inhabits its own private, apsidal chapel—down to the most modest etched floor tiles whose inscriptions have worn away with centuries of foot traffic, leaving it to one’s imagination whose relics might lie below the tile in the undercroft.
  • Someone was here," she whispered, pointing to a spot on the sarcophagus near Newton’s outstretched right foot.

  • There are no more uses of "sarcophagus" in the book.

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  • The Queen’s body was placed in a sarcophagus.
  • Lying in it, as in a grave or sarcophagus, with a hurried drapery of sheet and blanket thrown across it, was the body...
    Charles Dickens  --  Little Dorrit

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