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cipher
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The Da Vinci Code
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cipher -- as in: a secret cipher
Used In
The Da Vinci Code
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  • Part of it looks like a numeric cipher.
  • Langdon had once worked on a series of Baconian manuscripts that contained epigraphical ciphers in which certain lines of code were clues as to how to decipher the other lines.
  • At the age of twelve, Sophie could finish the Le Monde crossword without any help, and her grandfather graduated her to crosswords in English, mathematical puzzles, and substitution ciphers.
  • It works for all reflectional substitution ciphers, including the Atbash.
  • The Atbash Cipher is one of the oldest codes known to man.
  • The Atbash Cipher had indeed been part of Sophie’s early cryptology training.
  • The cipher dated back to 500 B.C. and was now used as a classroom example of a basic rotational substitution scheme.
  • A common form of Jewish cryptogram, the Atbash Cipher was a simple substitution code based on the twenty-two-letter Hebrew alphabet.
  • The Priory certainly would include the Atbash Cipher as part of their teachings.
  • "The only problem," Langdon said, "is that we don’t have anything on which to apply the cipher."
  • My dear, this is where the Atbash Cipher comes into play
  • Finally, a scholar applied the Atbash Cipher to the word, and his results were mind-numbing.
  • The cipher revealed that Sheshach was in fact a code word for another very well-known city.
  • "And the Atbash Cipher reveals…" He stopped short.
  • Each block was carved with a symbol, seemingly at random, creating a cipher of unfathomable proportion.
  • Looking at Sophie’s substitution matrix, Langdon felt a rising thrill that he imagined must have rivaled the thrill felt by early scholars when they first used the Atbash Cipher to decrypt the now famous Mystery of Sheshach.
  • Many great minds in history had invented cryptologic solutions to the challenge of data protection: Julius Caesar devised a code-writing scheme called the Caesar Box; Mary, Queen of Scots created a transposition cipher and sent secret communiqués from prison; and the brilliant Arab scientist Abu Yusuf Ismail al-Kindi protected his secrets with an ingeniously conceived polyalphabetic substitution cipher.
  • Many great minds in history had invented cryptologic solutions to the challenge of data protection: Julius Caesar devised a code-writing scheme called the Caesar Box; Mary, Queen of Scots created a transposition cipher and sent secret communiqués from prison; and the brilliant Arab scientist Abu Yusuf Ismail al-Kindi protected his secrets with an ingeniously conceived polyalphabetic substitution cipher.

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  • The message was written with a secret cipher.
  • solved the cipher

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