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literal
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The Da Vinci Code
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literal -- as in: in the most literal sense
Used In
The Da Vinci Code
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  • These were the gardens in which Claude Monet had experimented with form and color, and literally inspired the birth of the Impressionist movement.
  • As president-general of Opus Dei, Bishop Aringarosa had spent the last decade of his life spreading the message of "God’s Work"—literally, Opus Dei.
  • "Pagans" were literally unindoctrinated country-folk who clung to the old, rural religions of Nature worship.
  • Most tourists mistranslated Jardins des Tuileries as relating to the thousands of tulips that bloomed here, but Tuileries was actually a literal reference to something far less romantic.
  • He was the first to show that the human body is literally made of building blocks whose proportional ratios always equal PHI.
  • He is the author of numerous books: The Symbology of Secret Sects, The An of the Illuminati, The Lost Language of Ideograms, and when I say he wrote the book on Religious Iconology, I mean that quite literally.
  • Holy Grail is the literal meaning of Sangreal.
  • No, that’s the literal translation.
  • Literally, the very center of the Jewish faith.
  • As any Aramaic scholar will tell you, the word companion, in those days, literally meant spouse.
  • "Quite literally," Teabing said.
  • Sang Real literally meant Royal Blood.
  • The quest for the Holy Grail is literally the quest to kneel before the bones of Mary Magdalene.
  • The Grail is literally the ancient symbol for womanhood, and the Holy Grail represents the sacred feminine and the goddess, which of course has now been lost, virtually eliminated by the Church.
  • Many scholars claim that the early Church literally stole Jesus from His original followers, hijacking His human message, shrouding it in an impenetrable cloak of divinity, and using it to expand their own power.
  • Sophia literally means wisdom in Greek.
  • The root of your name, Sophie, is literally a ’word of wisdom.’
  • The problems arise when we begin to believe literally in our own metaphors.
  • "I think the headstone references a literal stone head," Langdon explained, savoring the familiar excitement of academic breakthrough.
  • Or that Jesus was not born of a literal virgin birth?
  • A literal tourist trap, one of Langdon’s befuddled colleagues had called it.
  • My friends who are devout Christians definitely believe that Christ literally walked on water, literally turned water into wine, and was born of a literal virgin birth.
  • My friends who are devout Christians definitely believe that Christ literally walked on water, literally turned water into wine, and was born of a literal virgin birth.
  • My friends who are devout Christians definitely believe that Christ literally walked on water, literally turned water into wine, and was born of a literal virgin birth.
  • Quite literally!
  • Saunière had left a literal reference to the devil.
  • Grail seekers, familiar with the Priory’s history of cryptic double-talk, had concluded la clef de voûte was a literal keystone—an architectural wedge—an engraved, encrypted stone, inserted into a vaulted archway in a church.

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  • She thinks the creation story in the Bible is a literal description; while he thinks it is poetic.
  • The computer has no common sense. It will interpret everything you tell it literally.

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