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The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
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Used In
The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
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unspecified meaning
  • It’s about ten minutes’ walk from here down to that dining-room, and any amount of stairs and passages in between.
  • It was less than minute, and she pretended to have been away for hours.

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  • In about ten minutes she reached it and found it was a lamp-post.
  • It’s getting wetter every minute.
  • I only meant to stay for a few minutes.
  • And it’s getting colder every minute, and we’ve brought nothing to eat.
  • It was growing darker every minute and what with that and the snowflakes swirling all round him he could hardly see three feet ahead.
  • In fact every minute it grew foggier and warmer.
  • But next minute that expression was quite gone.
  • They waited nearly five minutes.

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  • In a few minutes he had called another wolf and was with him down on the dam sniffing at the Beavers’ house.
  • The dwarf obeyed, and in a few minutes Edmund found himself being forced to walk as fast as he could with his hands tied behind him.
  • Only five minutes later he noticed a dozen crocuses growing round the foot of an old tree — gold and purple and white.
  • The moment that Edmund tells her that we’re all here she’ll set out to catch us this very night, and if he’s been gone about half an hour, she’ll be here in about another twenty minutes.
  • It seemed to Lucy only the next minute (though really it was hours and hours later) when she woke up feeling a little cold and dreadfully stiff and thinking how she would like a hot bath.
  • A few minutes later the Witch herself walked out on to the top of the hill and came straight across and stood before Aslan.
  • CHAPTER SEVENTEEN THE HUNTING OF THE WHITE STAG THE battle was all over a few minutes after their arrival.
  • Wait a minute.
  • Susan drained the potatoes and then put them all back in the empty pot to dry on the side of the range while Lucy was helping Mrs Beaver to dish up the trout, so that in a very few minutes everyone was drawing up their stools (it was all three-legged stools in the Beavers’ house except for Mrs Beaver’s own special rockingchair beside the fire) and preparing to enjoy themselves.
  • Those who had been afraid to come near him even after he was bound began to find their courage, and for a few minutes the two girls could not even see him — so thickly was he surrounded by the whole crowd of creatures kicking him, hitting him, spitting on him, jeering at him.
  • And then, as if that had been a signal, there was chattering and chirruping in every direction, and then a moment of full song, and within five minutes the whole wood was ringing with birds’ music, and wherever Edmund’s eyes turned he saw birds alighting on branches, or sailing overhead or chasing one another or having their little quarrels or tidying up their feathers with their beaks.
  • There was a jug of creamy milk for the children (Mr Beaver stuck to beer) and a great big lump of deep yellow butter in the middle of the table from which everyone took as much as he wanted to go with his potatoes, and all the children thought — and I agree with them — that there’s nothing to beat good freshwater fish if you eat it when it has been alive half an hour ago and has come out of the pan half a minute ago.
  • Edmund, who was becoming a nastier person every minute, thought that he had scored a great success, and went on at once to say, "There she goes again.
  • Then he tackled the towers on each side of them and after a few minutes of crashing and thudding both the towers and a good bit of the wall on each side went thundering down in a mass of hopeless rubble; and when the dust cleared it was odd, standing in that dry, grim, stony yard, to see through the gap all the grass and waving trees and sparkling streams of the forest, and the blue hills beyond that and beyond them the sky.
  • And into the interior they all rushed and for several minutes the whole of that dark, horrible, fusty old castle echoed with the opening of windows and with everyone’s voices crying out at once, "Don’t forget the dungeons — Give us a hand with this door!

  • There are no more uses of "minuteness" in the book.

To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a minute amount Define
very, very small
as in: keep the minutes Define
a written record of what happened at a meeting
Show Multiple Meanings (More common than this sense)
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